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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9973
Date: 2016-02-03

Author:Joseph Ryan

Subject:Re: foster parents - financial support to attract and retain better foster parents

Mark Testa and Nancy Rolock published a paper in Child Welfare on a similar topic - professional foster care. I suggest reading this article and finding studies that reference their study. https://www.questia.com/library/journal/1P3-38037413/professional-foster-care-a-future-worth-pursuing Joe On Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 5:36 PM, Edward Opton > wrote: Does research exist on the effects of financial support on efforts to attract and retain better foster parents? In general, organizations use financial incentives to attract applicants and to retain those who do the best work. These incentives are called "wages," "salaries," "compensation," and "employee benefits." Organizations that are concerned about the quality of their workforce offer pay sufficient to attract more applicants than they have openings. That allows the organization to pick and choose among applicants so that they can select those they evaluate as0 most likely to produce quality work. Compensation levels also are vital elements of organizations' efforts to reduce turnover costs, such as recruitment and training expenditures, and to retain their most productive employees. IS THERE RESEARCH ON COMPENSATION-QUALITY RELATIONSHIPS IN FOSTER CARE? For example: Would a 25% increase, or a 50% increase, or a100% increase in financial support for foster parents produce a substantial increase in the number of applicants? If the number of applicants increased, would child welfare agencies have the ability to improve selection practices? If they had that ability, would they use it? Or would they merely increase the level of easily counted but dubiously valid "objective" standards--number of rooms in home, number of windows, and the like--that may have little relationship to quality of parenting? What would be the effect of a 25%, 50%, or 100% increase in financial support for foster parents on a typical child welfare agency's total expenditures? For example, would a 100% increase in payments to foster parents increase the agency's expenditures by 5%? 10%? 30%? To what extent would such cost increases be offset by lower expenditures for placement in much more expensive congregate care facilities (because of a shortage of foster family homes), and by lower turnover costs (expenditures for recruitment and training of foster parents? To what extent would the costs of increased financial support for foster parents be offset by the difficult to quantify benefits of less frequent changes of placement and less damage to foster children as a result of consignment to parent-less congregate care facilities? Does evidence exist that increased financial support for foster parents would be counterproductive, e,g., that it would crowd the "pool" of applicants with people "only in it for the money?" To what extent would that negative effect be offset by the agency's ability to be more selective in choosing among applicants and to retain only those who carry out their responsibilities effectively? -- ------------------------------------------- Edward Opton (Pronouns: he / him / his) PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 -- Joseph P. Ryan, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Michigan

Mark Testa and Nancy Rolock published a paper in Child Welfare on a similar topic - professional foster care. I suggest reading this article and finding studies that reference their study. https://www.questia.com/library/journal/1P3-38037413/professional-foster-care-a-future-worth-pursuing Joe On Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 5:36 PM, Edward Opton > wrote: Does research exist on the effects of financial support on efforts to attract and retain better foster parents? In general, organizations use financial incentives to attract applicants and to retain those who do the best work. These incentives are called "wages," "salaries," "compensation," and "employee benefits." Organizations that are concerned about the quality of their workforce offer pay sufficient to attract more applicants than they have openings. That allows the organization to pick and choose among applicants so that they can select those they evaluate as0 most likely to produce quality work. Compensation levels also are vital elements of organizations' efforts to reduce turnover costs, such as recruitment and training expenditures, and to retain their most productive employees. IS THERE RESEARCH ON COMPENSATION-QUALITY RELATIONSHIPS IN FOSTER CARE? For example: Would a 25% increase, or a 50% increase, or a100% increase in financial support for foster parents produce a substantial increase in the number of applicants? If the number of applicants increased, would child welfare agencies have the ability to improve selection practices? If they had that ability, would they use it? Or would they merely increase the level of easily counted but dubiously valid "objective" standards--number of rooms in home, number of windows, and the like--that may have little relationship to quality of parenting? What would be the effect of a 25%, 50%, or 100% increase in financial support for foster parents on a typical child welfare agency's total expenditures? For example, would a 100% increase in payments to foster parents increase the agency's expenditures by 5%? 10%? 30%? To what extent would such cost increases be offset by lower expenditures for placement in much more expensive congregate care facilities (because of a shortage of foster family homes), and by lower turnover costs (expenditures for recruitment and training of foster parents? To what extent would the costs of increased financial support for foster parents be offset by the difficult to quantify benefits of less frequent changes of placement and less damage to foster children as a result of consignment to parent-less congregate care facilities? Does evidence exist that increased financial support for foster parents would be counterproductive, e,g., that it would crowd the "pool" of applicants with people "only in it for the money?" To what extent would that negative effect be offset by the agency's ability to be more selective in choosing among applicants and to retain only those who carry out their responsibilities effectively? -- ------------------------------------------- Edward Opton (Pronouns: he / him / his) PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 -- Joseph P. Ryan, Ph.D. Associate Professor University of Michigan