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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9923
Date: 2015-11-07

Author:Jane Marshall

Subject:Re: References on how law enforcement agency in MDT enhanced responding to child abuse cases

Dear Mr. Takaoka, Please see the following 2012 report that covers some research done on police-social worker teams in the U.S. I believe there has been follow-up research done on the San Diego project that may show longer-term results. http://adoptionresearch.illinoisstate.edu/PEP%20Talk%20Issue%201%20online-%20Law%20enforcement-Social%20Work.pdf Do keep in mind the complexity of trust historically disenfranchised community members may have for MDTs, as is the case here in Minneapolis, Minnesota. While it may sound like a good idea to send both a social work and a law enforcement to domestic violence calls for service, for example, those are two entities that spell out trouble for a family who may distrust both of these authority figures and result in much less buy in by the family. Take care, Jane Jane Marie Marshall, PhD Research & Evaluation Associate, Council on Crime and Justice On Fri, Nov 6, 2015 at 5:46 AM, Kota Takaoka > wrote: Dear colleagues, I am Kota Takaoka, a visiting researcher in University of British Columbia. My Japanese colleagues and I have been searching of references on how multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs) between child welfare, medical, and law enforcement agencies improved responding to child abuse cases. For example, they are stats or evidence on reporting and corresponding chid abuse cases after Children’s Justice Act of 1986 in U.S that requested police officers and prosecuting attorneys to join MDTs. This is because the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Justice in Japan decide to conduct MDTs-building from this month. I found several social cost research and investigation time research published by National Children Advocacy Centre, but I couldn’t find references on how the MDTs have improved the situation to deal with child abuse cases after establishing laws that designate law enforcement to collaborate with child welfare and medical professionals. I would appreciate if you would tell me about any countries’ evidence on the topic. Especially, it would be great if you could show me references on changing the amount of reporting or corresponding cases before and after MDTs setup. Thank you very much, Sincerely, Kota Takaoka ======================================================================= Kota Takaoka, Ph.D. / Clinical psychologist / Forensic Interviewer Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Visiting Research Affiliate, University of British Columbia Visiting Researcher, Japan Child and Family Research Institute E-mail: kotavision1@gmail.com Web: www.kotavision.com Twitter: @chronologic1 ========================================================================

Dear Mr. Takaoka, Please see the following 2012 report that covers some research done on police-social worker teams in the U.S. I believe there has been follow-up research done on the San Diego project that may show longer-term results. http://adoptionresearch.illinoisstate.edu/PEP%20Talk%20Issue%201%20online-%20Law%20enforcement-Social%20Work.pdf Do keep in mind the complexity of trust historically disenfranchised community members may have for MDTs, as is the case here in Minneapolis, Minnesota. While it may sound like a good idea to send both a social work and a law enforcement to domestic violence calls for service, for example, those are two entities that spell out trouble for a family who may distrust both of these authority figures and result in much less buy in by the family. Take care, Jane Jane Marie Marshall, PhD Research & Evaluation Associate, Council on Crime and Justice On Fri, Nov 6, 2015 at 5:46 AM, Kota Takaoka > wrote: Dear colleagues, I am Kota Takaoka, a visiting researcher in University of British Columbia. My Japanese colleagues and I have been searching of references on how multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs) between child welfare, medical, and law enforcement agencies improved responding to child abuse cases. For example, they are stats or evidence on reporting and corresponding chid abuse cases after Children’s Justice Act of 1986 in U.S that requested police officers and prosecuting attorneys to join MDTs. This is because the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Justice in Japan decide to conduct MDTs-building from this month. I found several social cost research and investigation time research published by National Children Advocacy Centre, but I couldn’t find references on how the MDTs have improved the situation to deal with child abuse cases after establishing laws that designate law enforcement to collaborate with child welfare and medical professionals. I would appreciate if you would tell me about any countries’ evidence on the topic. Especially, it would be great if you could show me references on changing the amount of reporting or corresponding cases before and after MDTs setup. Thank you very much, Sincerely, Kota Takaoka ======================================================================= Kota Takaoka, Ph.D. / Clinical psychologist / Forensic Interviewer Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Visiting Research Affiliate, University of British Columbia Visiting Researcher, Japan Child and Family Research Institute E-mail: kotavision1gmail.com Web: www.kotavision.com Twitter: chronologic1 ========================================================================