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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9857
Date: 2015-07-15

Author:Michael Heard

Subject:RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How?

It should be noted that few of those would be reasons most birth parents in public child welfare would move their own children. I think the obvious answer to how to address multiple foster care placements is to do a better job at keeping children in their homes in the first place. After 20 plus years working in public child welfare, I could dialogue forever about the collateral damage of well-intended removals and, too often, the subsequent multiple placements that follow. The wonderful and courageous Molly McGrath Tierney eloquently addresses this issue with this TED talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c15hy8dXSps Michael Heard, MSW Social Services Manager Washington State Office of Public Defense 711 S. Capitol Way Ste 106 Olympia, WA 98504-0957 (360) 586-3164 ex. 111 (800) 414-6064 ex. 111 (360) 586-8165 fax michael.heard@opd.wa.gov www.opd.wa.gov From: bounce-119451475-8404704@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119451475-8404704@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of beth peters Sent: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 9:04 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Hi All, I was a foster care social worker in Philadelphia in the early 1990's which inspired me to become a psychologist. In my experience, frequent moves are due to a variety of factors including: * attempts to put siblings together * foster parent request due to overwhelm or poor fit or unwillingness to do what the child needs * acting out behavior of other children in the home presenting a safety issue for all * illness (mental or physical) of the foster parent * foster parent feels their own children are being negatively impacted by the foster child so they close the home * agency decision based on "better" fit in another home for a child (e.g. opening in African American home for black child currently in out-of-touch Caucasian foster home) * unwillingness of foster family to adopt the child so child is moved to a foster to adopt home * acting out behavior of the foster child which exceeds the current foster parents' ability to cope or manage - this was the most common that I observed suggesting that foster parents are ill equipped to manage the symptoms of abuse and neglect and attachment issues of foster children I felt so strongly about the impact of multiple moves that I wrote a book for foster kids moving from foster home to foster home (in preparation for publication). If anyone wants to back channel me about ways to get this book to foster kids, I would love to hear your ideas. Best, Beth Beth Peters, PhD Licensed Psychologist 10090 Garrison St Westminster, CO 80021 303-704-3612 www.drbethpeters.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email contains information from the sender that may be confidential, legally privileged, proprietary or otherwise protected from disclosure. This email is intended for use only by the person or entity to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, any use, disclosure, copying, distribution, printing, or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this email, is strictly prohibited. If you received this email in error, please contact the sending party by replying in an email to the sender, delete the email from your computer system and destroy any paper copies of the printed email. ________________________________ From: "Lehmann, Peter" > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2015 6:50 AM Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Hi; I'd argue there is a relationship between multiple moves and the lack of thought-out trajectory on cases. What I mean by that is when there is an absence of planning, goal setting, and knowing where we are heading with children and youth in care, the risk for increased and longer placement could go up. Trajectory also means reaching a common understanding as to the seriousness with families of why any child is in care but also coming to a common agreement about what needs to happen for any child to come home. If families and their networks don't know what's expected and do not plan together with the worker/supervisor about what safety will look like and what must be put in place, well children and youth can languish. Here is where partnership with families/networks trumps paternalism towards families every time. This may not be easy but the science is clear about this outcome p in tx ps-It's a long day on the golf course if you don't know where the hole is-Michael Hoyt ________________________________ From: bounce-119444745-6833529@list.cornell.edu [bounce-119444745-6833529@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Lucy Hudson [lhudson@zerotothree.org] Sent: Friday, July 10, 2015 9:11 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Yes, it is something we should be focusing on! ZERO TO THREE’s Safe Babies Court Teams Project focuses on ten core components, one of which is making the first placement the last placement. For all children, but especially for the very youngest, their well-being hinges on having loving reciprocal relationships with a few trusted caregivers. Every move reduces their ability to trust adults and damages their self-esteem. The statistics about changes in placement are skewed downward because a child moving from one home to another within a foster care agency isn’t seen as changing placements. Lucy Hudson Director, Safe Babies Court Teams Project ZERO TO THREE 1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 350 Washington, DC 20037 202-857-2629 (office) 202-246-1276 (cell) 202-638-0851 (fax) From: bounce-119126208-8130703@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119126208-8130703@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carolee Gadsby Sent: Sunday, May 03, 2015 3:15 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Please excuse my response as it is blunt and I'm only a Mom. But I was a foster mom for yrs, meet a lot of foster parents, was prez of the ass. ... The list goes on. But one thing I can tell you is some foster parents expect the child/children to be perfect .... And when they are not... The ask them to be moved 😥 I am very aware of this problem as I would take the "hard to place" children in my home and also babysat during the day for other foster parents who needed a break from the children in their home.... Some would bring me their kids daily from 7-7 I do know there are problems on all levels of the system but this is an issue that truly hurts my heart. Btw.... I adopted out at 10 kids between bio and adopted. Many of mine are "special" ..... VERY special to me! Carolee :) Sent from my iPad On Apr 30, 2015, at 2:13 PM, Edward Opton > wrote: Frequent changes of placement seem to be a fact of life for America's foster children--five, ten, even twenty or more moves. Why? What can be done to reduce the frequency of moves? Are frequent moves beyond our control, like the fact that the sun is visible in the daytime but cannot be seen at night, and so hardly worth discussing? Or is the practice of moving children frequently worthy of investigation and action? If so, who has written about it most cogently? Edward Opton, Ph.D., J.D. PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 youthlaw.org

It should be noted that few of those would be reasons most birth parents in public child welfare would move their own children. I think the obvious answer to how to address multiple foster care placements is to do a better job at keeping children in their homes in the first place. After 20 plus years working in public child welfare, I could dialogue forever about the collateral damage of well-intended removals and, too often, the subsequent multiple placements that follow. The wonderful and courageous Molly McGrath Tierney eloquently addresses this issue with this TED talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c15hy8dXSps Michael Heard, MSW Social Services Manager Washington State Office of Public Defense 711 S. Capitol Way Ste 106 Olympia, WA 98504-0957 (360) 586-3164 ex. 111 (800) 414-6064 ex. 111 (360) 586-8165 fax michael.heardopd.wa.gov www.opd.wa.gov From: bounce-119451475-8404704list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119451475-8404704list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of beth peters Sent: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 9:04 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Hi All, I was a foster care social worker in Philadelphia in the early 1990's which inspired me to become a psychologist. In my experience, frequent moves are due to a variety of factors including: * attempts to put siblings together * foster parent request due to overwhelm or poor fit or unwillingness to do what the child needs * acting out behavior of other children in the home presenting a safety issue for all * illness (mental or physical) of the foster parent * foster parent feels their own children are being negatively impacted by the foster child so they close the home * agency decision based on "better" fit in another home for a child (e.g. opening in African American home for black child currently in out-of-touch Caucasian foster home) * unwillingness of foster family to adopt the child so child is moved to a foster to adopt home * acting out behavior of the foster child which exceeds the current foster parents' ability to cope or manage - this was the most common that I observed suggesting that foster parents are ill equipped to manage the symptoms of abuse and neglect and attachment issues of foster children I felt so strongly about the impact of multiple moves that I wrote a book for foster kids moving from foster home to foster home (in preparation for publication). If anyone wants to back channel me about ways to get this book to foster kids, I would love to hear your ideas. Best, Beth Beth Peters, PhD Licensed Psychologist 10090 Garrison St Westminster, CO 80021 303-704-3612 www.drbethpeters.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email contains information from the sender that may be confidential, legally privileged, proprietary or otherwise protected from disclosure. This email is intended for use only by the person or entity to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, any use, disclosure, copying, distribution, printing, or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this email, is strictly prohibited. If you received this email in error, please contact the sending party by replying in an email to the sender, delete the email from your computer system and destroy any paper copies of the printed email. ________________________________ From: "Lehmann, Peter" > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Sent: Sunday, July 12, 2015 6:50 AM Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Hi; I'd argue there is a relationship between multiple moves and the lack of thought-out trajectory on cases. What I mean by that is when there is an absence of planning, goal setting, and knowing where we are heading with children and youth in care, the risk for increased and longer placement could go up. Trajectory also means reaching a common understanding as to the seriousness with families of why any child is in care but also coming to a common agreement about what needs to happen for any child to come home. If families and their networks don't know what's expected and do not plan together with the worker/supervisor about what safety will look like and what must be put in place, well children and youth can languish. Here is where partnership with families/networks trumps paternalism towards families every time. This may not be easy but the science is clear about this outcome p in tx ps-It's a long day on the golf course if you don't know where the hole is-Michael Hoyt ________________________________ From: bounce-119444745-6833529list.cornell.edu [bounce-119444745-6833529list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Lucy Hudson [lhudsonzerotothree.org] Sent: Friday, July 10, 2015 9:11 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Yes, it is something we should be focusing on! ZERO TO THREE’s Safe Babies Court Teams Project focuses on ten core components, one of which is making the first placement the last placement. For all children, but especially for the very youngest, their well-being hinges on having loving reciprocal relationships with a few trusted caregivers. Every move reduces their ability to trust adults and damages their self-esteem. The statistics about changes in placement are skewed downward because a child moving from one home to another within a foster care agency isn’t seen as changing placements. Lucy Hudson Director, Safe Babies Court Teams Project ZERO TO THREE 1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 350 Washington, DC 20037 202-857-2629 (office) 202-246-1276 (cell) 202-638-0851 (fax) From: bounce-119126208-8130703list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119126208-8130703list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carolee Gadsby Sent: Sunday, May 03, 2015 3:15 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Please excuse my response as it is blunt and I'm only a Mom. But I was a foster mom for yrs, meet a lot of foster parents, was prez of the ass. ... The list goes on. But one thing I can tell you is some foster parents expect the child/children to be perfect .... And when they are not... The ask them to be moved 😥 I am very aware of this problem as I would take the "hard to place" children in my home and also babysat during the day for other foster parents who needed a break from the children in their home.... Some would bring me their kids daily from 7-7 I do know there are problems on all levels of the system but this is an issue that truly hurts my heart. Btw.... I adopted out at 10 kids between bio and adopted. Many of mine are "special" ..... VERY special to me! Carolee :) Sent from my iPad On Apr 30, 2015, at 2:13 PM, Edward Opton > wrote: Frequent changes of placement seem to be a fact of life for America's foster children--five, ten, even twenty or more moves. Why? What can be done to reduce the frequency of moves? Are frequent moves beyond our control, like the fact that the sun is visible in the daytime but cannot be seen at night, and so hardly worth discussing? Or is the practice of moving children frequently worthy of investigation and action? If so, who has written about it most cogently? Edward Opton, Ph.D., J.D. PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 youthlaw.org