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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9815
Date: 2015-05-01

Author:Jerry Callan

Subject:RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How?

I am the director of Family Finding at Hillside Family of Agencies in upstate New York. Family Finding is a model to find permanency and lifetime connections for disconnected youth. In our experience, a child who has lost connections to family and other meaningful adults, is often a child who will be moved frequently in the foster care system. It is not uncommon for us to do Family Finding with a child who has moved 10, 15 or 20 times. Family Finding has often been able to help the child recover hope through reconnecting with the meaningful people in their life, and stabilize from the constant moving. Jerry Callan, LMSW Family Finding Director Hillside Family of Agencies 1 Mustard St. Rochester, NY 14609 www.hillside.com/familyfinding ________________________________ From: bounce-119119013-65939837@list.cornell.edu [bounce-119119013-65939837@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Ruth Anne White [rwhite@nchcw.org] Sent: Friday, May 01, 2015 8:22 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Dear All, I share an interest in the questions posed by Dr. Opton yesterday afternoon. Aside from the psychological and emotional toll this levies on children, I am also interested in what can be done to capitalize on existing child welfare funding flexibility. Multiple moves indicate certainly a form of funding flexibility, do they not? I am often told that the money cannot be used flexibly to find the most appropriate placement (or an independent) apartment and services for older youth in care because the funding is either not available or inflexible. Therefore, I’m interested in how it is that the youth can be moved so frequently, given these restrictions. Has anyone researched any of the questions the Dr. poses so eloquently to this listserv? Is there any good research on how the decision to move a child are made, etc.? Best, Ruthie Ruth White, MSSA Executive Director National Center for Housing & Child Welfare 4707 Calvert Road College Park, MD 20740 phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 fax 301-699-0152 rwhite@nchcw.org www.nchcw.org Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. From: bounce-119115855-12859385@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119115855-12859385@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Edward Opton Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 1:56 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Frequent changes of placement seem to be a fact of life for America's foster children--five, ten, even twenty or more moves. Why? What can be done to reduce the frequency of moves? Are frequent moves beyond our control, like the fact that the sun is visible in the daytime but cannot be seen at night, and so hardly worth discussing? Or is the practice of moving children frequently worthy of investigation and action? If so, who has written about it most cogently? Edward Opton, Ph.D., J.D. PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 youthlaw.org

I am the director of Family Finding at Hillside Family of Agencies in upstate New York. Family Finding is a model to find permanency and lifetime connections for disconnected youth. In our experience, a child who has lost connections to family and other meaningful adults, is often a child who will be moved frequently in the foster care system. It is not uncommon for us to do Family Finding with a child who has moved 10, 15 or 20 times. Family Finding has often been able to help the child recover hope through reconnecting with the meaningful people in their life, and stabilize from the constant moving. Jerry Callan, LMSW Family Finding Director Hillside Family of Agencies 1 Mustard St. Rochester, NY 14609 www.hillside.com/familyfinding ________________________________ From: bounce-119119013-65939837list.cornell.edu [bounce-119119013-65939837list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Ruth Anne White [rwhitenchcw.org] Sent: Friday, May 01, 2015 8:22 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Dear All, I share an interest in the questions posed by Dr. Opton yesterday afternoon. Aside from the psychological and emotional toll this levies on children, I am also interested in what can be done to capitalize on existing child welfare funding flexibility. Multiple moves indicate certainly a form of funding flexibility, do they not? I am often told that the money cannot be used flexibly to find the most appropriate placement (or an independent) apartment and services for older youth in care because the funding is either not available or inflexible. Therefore, I’m interested in how it is that the youth can be moved so frequently, given these restrictions. Has anyone researched any of the questions the Dr. poses so eloquently to this listserv? Is there any good research on how the decision to move a child are made, etc.? Best, Ruthie Ruth White, MSSA Executive Director National Center for Housing & Child Welfare 4707 Calvert Road College Park, MD 20740 phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 fax 301-699-0152 rwhitenchcw.org www.nchcw.org Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. From: bounce-119115855-12859385list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-119115855-12859385list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Edward Opton Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 1:56 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Why do we move foster children so often? Should we move them less often? How? Frequent changes of placement seem to be a fact of life for America's foster children--five, ten, even twenty or more moves. Why? What can be done to reduce the frequency of moves? Are frequent moves beyond our control, like the fact that the sun is visible in the daytime but cannot be seen at night, and so hardly worth discussing? Or is the practice of moving children frequently worthy of investigation and action? If so, who has written about it most cogently? Edward Opton, Ph.D., J.D. PsychDrugs Action National Center for Youth Law 405 14th Street, 15th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 Phone: (510) 899-6583 Fax: (510) 835-8099 youthlaw.org