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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9814
Date: 2015-04-28

Author:Oreskovich, Joanne

Subject:RE: Asking for Information on BMI for Age for American Kids of East Asian Descent

You might check the Youth Risk Behavioral Survey and their factsheet regarding the percentage of children at the 95th or 85 to 95 percentiles who are obese: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/yrbs/pdf/us_obesity_combo.pdf . Also the methodology for calculating percentiles can be found at this site: http://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/cdc_charts.htm . See 2000 CDC Growth Charts for US: Methods and Development. It is unlikely to date, that federal US or state based surveys like NHANES or YRBS will have such a refined breakdown of Asian categories, largely due to sample sizes and ability to weight the data for statewide or national prevalence estimates. You might try contacting the authors of peer review journal articles who have researched this issue on specific subpopulations to get the data needed. I saw this on ScienceDaily: Which Group of Asian-American Children Is at Highest Risk for Obesity? http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129130410.htm Asian-American children have been at low risk for being overweight or obese compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., but that may be changing. Yet as rates of overweight and obesity rise, the risk appears to vary depending on the Asian country of origin, according to a new article. Hope that helps, Joanne Joanne Oreskovich, PhD Operational Research Analyst DPHHS/Children & Family Services Division 301 S. Park Ave., PO Box 8005 Helena, MT 59604-8005 406.841.2455 (phone) 406.841.2487 (fax) From: bounce-118983816-70502583@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-118983816-70502583@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Chen, Lijun Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 10:21 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Asking for Information on BMI for Age for American Kids of East Asian Descent Dear Colleagues, I am searching for information on the BMI weight status, i.e. overweight and obesity, of US kids whose ethnicity is Chinese, Korean or Japanese. The research reports as indicated in the CDC website (http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html ) only report the results for white, black, Hispanic and Asian children, without further breakdown of the Asian ethnic group. I would appreciate any information you can provide. Besides, I have a technical question regards the development / interpretation of the BMI for age growth chart. A child with a BMI value over the 95 percentile line is regarded as obese, and as overweight for a BMI between 85 to 95 percentile. This can mislead unsuspecting people, including me, to think that only 5% are obese, while report in recent years have shown a prevalence rate of obesity over 16% for 2 to 19 years old. I am trying to understand how the CDC BMI-for-age growth chart was created, and the rationale for the percentiles. I would be glad if anyone can shed some light on this issue. Thanks Lijun Chen Senior Researcher Chapin Center at the University of Chicago

You might check the Youth Risk Behavioral Survey and their factsheet regarding the percentage of children at the 95th or 85 to 95 percentiles who are obese: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/yrbs/pdf/us_obesity_combo.pdf . Also the methodology for calculating percentiles can be found at this site: http://www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/cdc_charts.htm . See 2000 CDC Growth Charts for US: Methods and Development. It is unlikely to date, that federal US or state based surveys like NHANES or YRBS will have such a refined breakdown of Asian categories, largely due to sample sizes and ability to weight the data for statewide or national prevalence estimates. You might try contacting the authors of peer review journal articles who have researched this issue on specific subpopulations to get the data needed. I saw this on ScienceDaily: Which Group of Asian-American Children Is at Highest Risk for Obesity? http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129130410.htm Asian-American children have been at low risk for being overweight or obese compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., but that may be changing. Yet as rates of overweight and obesity rise, the risk appears to vary depending on the Asian country of origin, according to a new article. Hope that helps, Joanne Joanne Oreskovich, PhD Operational Research Analyst DPHHS/Children & Family Services Division 301 S. Park Ave., PO Box 8005 Helena, MT 59604-8005 406.841.2455 (phone) 406.841.2487 (fax) From: bounce-118983816-70502583list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-118983816-70502583list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Chen, Lijun Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 10:21 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Asking for Information on BMI for Age for American Kids of East Asian Descent Dear Colleagues, I am searching for information on the BMI weight status, i.e. overweight and obesity, of US kids whose ethnicity is Chinese, Korean or Japanese. The research reports as indicated in the CDC website (http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/childhood.html ) only report the results for white, black, Hispanic and Asian children, without further breakdown of the Asian ethnic group. I would appreciate any information you can provide. Besides, I have a technical question regards the development / interpretation of the BMI for age growth chart. A child with a BMI value over the 95 percentile line is regarded as obese, and as overweight for a BMI between 85 to 95 percentile. This can mislead unsuspecting people, including me, to think that only 5% are obese, while report in recent years have shown a prevalence rate of obesity over 16% for 2 to 19 years old. I am trying to understand how the CDC BMI-for-age growth chart was created, and the rationale for the percentiles. I would be glad if anyone can shed some light on this issue. Thanks Lijun Chen Senior Researcher Chapin Center at the University of Chicago