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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9808
Date: 2015-04-28

Author:Amber McDonald

Subject:Re: single-party recordings in law enforcement investigations of child sexual abuse

Dr. Fontes, It looks like there is not a specific statute in the State of Colorado which allows for one party to record a conversation (in some capacity) and provide the recorded conversation to law enforcement. It looks like it is a constitutional expectation of privacy analysis only. Essentially you don't have an expectation of privacy in what you tell another individual if one person within the conversation decides to share it. Hope this is helpful. Amber Amber McDonald, LCSW PhD Student - Graduate School of Social Work University of Denver amber.mcdonald@du.edu m cdonald.amber.r@gmail.com 720.301.6338 On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:53 AM, Lisa Fontes > wrote: Dear Colleagues, For the Prosecutor's office in Guyana, South America, I am looking for: 1) A copy of state or federal legislation establishing the legality of single=party recording in the investigation of child sexual abuse. In other words, situations where a victim might "wear a wire" and either confront in-person or over the phone his or her abuser and say things that encourage the abuser to admit to the crime (such as, "Can I get pregnant from what we did?") 2) Any articles about or research about or presentations about the same. Please feel free to contact me directly if you need to know more about the context in which this help is sought: LFontes@uww.umass.edu Thank you. Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. University of Massachusett, Amherst

Dr. Fontes, It looks like there is not a specific statute in the State of Colorado which allows for one party to record a conversation (in some capacity) and provide the recorded conversation to law enforcement. It looks like it is a constitutional expectation of privacy analysis only. Essentially you don't have an expectation of privacy in what you tell another individual if one person within the conversation decides to share it. Hope this is helpful. Amber Amber McDonald, LCSW PhD Student - Graduate School of Social Work University of Denver amber.mcdonalddu.edu m cdonald.amber.rgmail.com 720.301.6338 On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 9:53 AM, Lisa Fontes > wrote: Dear Colleagues, For the Prosecutor's office in Guyana, South America, I am looking for: 1) A copy of state or federal legislation establishing the legality of single=party recording in the investigation of child sexual abuse. In other words, situations where a victim might "wear a wire" and either confront in-person or over the phone his or her abuser and say things that encourage the abuser to admit to the crime (such as, "Can I get pregnant from what we did?") 2) Any articles about or research about or presentations about the same. Please feel free to contact me directly if you need to know more about the context in which this help is sought: LFontesuww.umass.edu Thank you. Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. University of Massachusett, Amherst