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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9797
Date: 2015-03-18

Author:Hallman, Kelly

Subject:prompting for responses among 10-14 year-olds

Hello, I am working with children aged 10-14 in LMICs around issues of pregnancy knowledge and risk. In my experience interviewing this age group, we have not prompted for responses (i.e., read the response options to them) due to concerns of children feeling compelled to say “yes” to something just to please the interviewer. I have a colleague who is insisting we read the response options to the interviewees. Is there an academic literature indicating what the best strategy is here? Even US or European studies would be useful. Thanks, Kelly ________________________________________ Kelly K. Hallman, PhD Senior Associate POPULATION COUNCIL IDEAS. EVIDENCE. IMPACT. www.popcouncil.org ________________________________________

Hello, I am working with children aged 10-14 in LMICs around issues of pregnancy knowledge and risk. In my experience interviewing this age group, we have not prompted for responses (i.e., read the response options to them) due to concerns of children feeling compelled to say “yes” to something just to please the interviewer. I have a colleague who is insisting we read the response options to the interviewees. Is there an academic literature indicating what the best strategy is here? Even US or European studies would be useful. Thanks, Kelly ________________________________________ Kelly K. Hallman, PhD Senior Associate POPULATION COUNCIL IDEAS. EVIDENCE. IMPACT. www.popcouncil.org ________________________________________