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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9736
Date: 2014-10-10

Author:Bruce Borkosky

Subject:Re: medical neglect

I think it helps to keep in mind 3 aspects to this question: 1. reporting requirements 2. legal determinations 3. research / ethical literature From a practical standpoint, the only aspect that matters is #1 - your reporting requirements. the other two are merely of interest to curiosity, or perhaps researchers. Although state statutes differ somewhat in terms of specific language, in general the bar for reporting is very low. the standard is, generally, suspicion of abuse/neglect. Therefore, if the question arises sufficiently to indicate use of a protocol, then, no matter what the protocol indicated, that would also indicate that reporting would be called for. IOW, there is no benefit to having a protocol, because you would always report. Now, reporting requirements differ from the standard for taking a report, and for investigating the allegations. However, these standards should not be used by practitioners - only by the agency taking reports. There may be many different kinds of medical neglect, and each one could be reportable. One can always report and have the agency determine if a report will be taken BB On Wed, Oct 8, 2014 at 3:42 PM, Johnson Motoyama, Michelle > wrote: All, We’re working with a hospital that is interested in implementing a protocol to assist staff in identifying and appropriately referring children to CPS for suspected medical neglect. We’re seeking information about assessments or protocols that hospitals currently have in place, particularly those with empirical support, as well as information about existing practices in the field. Many thanks in advance, Michelle *********************************** Michelle Johnson-Motoyama, Ph.D., M.S.W. Associate Professor|University of Kansas School of Social Welfare 311 Twente Hall|1545 Lilac Lane Lawrence, KS 66045 michellejm@ku.edu 785-864-2378 |785-864-5277 (FAX) -- Bruce G. Borkosky, Psy.D. PA 1800 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 863-386-0276 800-919-9008 Fax 813-200-8450 email: ForensicPsychologist@outlook.com forensic psych search engine: www.fl-forensic.com/search-1/ This communication is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, please communicate the error immediately, and delete all copies.

I think it helps to keep in mind 3 aspects to this question: 1. reporting requirements 2. legal determinations 3. research / ethical literature From a practical standpoint, the only aspect that matters is #1 - your reporting requirements. the other two are merely of interest to curiosity, or perhaps researchers. Although state statutes differ somewhat in terms of specific language, in general the bar for reporting is very low. the standard is, generally, suspicion of abuse/neglect. Therefore, if the question arises sufficiently to indicate use of a protocol, then, no matter what the protocol indicated, that would also indicate that reporting would be called for. IOW, there is no benefit to having a protocol, because you would always report. Now, reporting requirements differ from the standard for taking a report, and for investigating the allegations. However, these standards should not be used by practitioners - only by the agency taking reports. There may be many different kinds of medical neglect, and each one could be reportable. One can always report and have the agency determine if a report will be taken BB On Wed, Oct 8, 2014 at 3:42 PM, Johnson Motoyama, Michelle > wrote: All, We’re working with a hospital that is interested in implementing a protocol to assist staff in identifying and appropriately referring children to CPS for suspected medical neglect. We’re seeking information about assessments or protocols that hospitals currently have in place, particularly those with empirical support, as well as information about existing practices in the field. Many thanks in advance, Michelle *********************************** Michelle Johnson-Motoyama, Ph.D., M.S.W. Associate Professor|University of Kansas School of Social Welfare 311 Twente Hall|1545 Lilac Lane Lawrence, KS 66045 michellejmku.edu 785-864-2378 |785-864-5277 (FAX) -- Bruce G. Borkosky, Psy.D. PA 1800 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 863-386-0276 800-919-9008 Fax 813-200-8450 email: ForensicPsychologistoutlook.com forensic psych search engine: www.fl-forensic.com/search-1/ This communication is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, please communicate the error immediately, and delete all copies.