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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9669
Date: 2014-07-02

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: TFC Eligibility Resources?

Quite a long time ago, maybe around 2000, the OIG of DHHS did a report on TFC. One of the concerns was that in theory THC was for short-term interventions but kids would stay in TFC placements for a long time, kind of opposing the reference to placement stability, no? (Also, availability of TFC placements is less than for regular foster care, meaning kids are more likely to be placed at a location distant from their home and school). Also, TFC training tends to be pretty generic. In theory, foster placements for children with special medical needs includes training and support relevant to the specific condition, but TFC training is as generic as psychiatric residential treatment often is. Which is a problem, since (for example) behavior issues resulting from anxiety disorders get the same response as those resulting from conduct disorders. Sheri McMahon ________________________________ From: terrym@ku.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu CC: mpatrick@tfics.org Subject: RE: TFC Eligibility Resources? Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 15:35:12 +0000 TFI Family Services in Kansas has developed a very nice web-based placement matching system that uses a child assessment tool called the Appropriate Placement Level Indicator (APLI). The APLI (73 items) provides a recommended level of care (one of which is therapeutic foster care). The assessment is completed every time a child is needing placement. We analyzed the tool for its ability to predict placement stability for both first and subsequent placements, and found that placements made in accordance with the indicated level of care were more stable. I would agree that there is little empirical research on protocols for determining level of care such as TFC. Likewise we found very little research on placement matching protocols. We have recently completed a manuscript we are submitting for publication but would be willing to talk with you about our research. Mike Patrick, with TFI Family Services (mpatrick@tfics.org ), is a good source of information about their approach to placement decision making and their placement matching system (ECAP). Terry Moore Director of the Results Oriented Management (ROM) Project Center for Children & Families University of Kansas School of Social Welfare 785.864.8938 (office) "ROM, where every child counts" -----Original Message----- From: bounce-116788969-6833918@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-116788969-6833918@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Wilsie, Carisa C (HSC) Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2014 5:46 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: TFC Eligibility Resources? Oklahoma's child protective system is asking for assistance in developing a better protocol for determining if a child is eligible for therapeutic foster care. I am finding very little empirical research on this topic. Anyone aware of any helpful resources? Thank you, Carisa Carisa C. Wilsie, Ph.D. Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Child Study Center 1100 N.E. 13th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73117 Phone: 405-271-5700 ext. 45132 Fax: 405-271-8835 CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail, including any attachments, contains information from The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, which may be confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by "reply to sender only" message and destroy all electronic and hard copies of the communication, including attachments.

Quite a long time ago, maybe around 2000, the OIG of DHHS did a report on TFC. One of the concerns was that in theory THC was for short-term interventions but kids would stay in TFC placements for a long time, kind of opposing the reference to placement stability, no? (Also, availability of TFC placements is less than for regular foster care, meaning kids are more likely to be placed at a location distant from their home and school). Also, TFC training tends to be pretty generic. In theory, foster placements for children with special medical needs includes training and support relevant to the specific condition, but TFC training is as generic as psychiatric residential treatment often is. Which is a problem, since (for example) behavior issues resulting from anxiety disorders get the same response as those resulting from conduct disorders. Sheri McMahon ________________________________ From: terrymku.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu CC: mpatricktfics.org Subject: RE: TFC Eligibility Resources? Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 15:35:12 +0000 TFI Family Services in Kansas has developed a very nice web-based placement matching system that uses a child assessment tool called the Appropriate Placement Level Indicator (APLI). The APLI (73 items) provides a recommended level of care (one of which is therapeutic foster care). The assessment is completed every time a child is needing placement. We analyzed the tool for its ability to predict placement stability for both first and subsequent placements, and found that placements made in accordance with the indicated level of care were more stable. I would agree that there is little empirical research on protocols for determining level of care such as TFC. Likewise we found very little research on placement matching protocols. We have recently completed a manuscript we are submitting for publication but would be willing to talk with you about our research. Mike Patrick, with TFI Family Services (mpatricktfics.org ), is a good source of information about their approach to placement decision making and their placement matching system (ECAP). Terry Moore Director of the Results Oriented Management (ROM) Project Center for Children & Families University of Kansas School of Social Welfare 785.864.8938 (office) "ROM, where every child counts" -----Original Message----- From: bounce-116788969-6833918list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-116788969-6833918list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Wilsie, Carisa C (HSC) Sent: Thursday, June 26, 2014 5:46 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: TFC Eligibility Resources? Oklahoma's child protective system is asking for assistance in developing a better protocol for determining if a child is eligible for therapeutic foster care. I am finding very little empirical research on this topic. Anyone aware of any helpful resources? Thank you, Carisa Carisa C. Wilsie, Ph.D. Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Child Study Center 1100 N.E. 13th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73117 Phone: 405-271-5700 ext. 45132 Fax: 405-271-8835 CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail, including any attachments, contains information from The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, which may be confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by "reply to sender only" message and destroy all electronic and hard copies of the communication, including attachments.