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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9652
Date: 2014-05-07

Author:Rich Gehrman

Subject:RE: child maltreatment investigations

Aron, The source of the information reported in the Minneapolis Star Tribune is the 2012 Child Maltreatment report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-resea rch/child-maltreatment. This report shows the rate at which states screen in reports of child maltreatment, called 'referrals' in at the federal level. This doesn't get at the question of whether 'referrals' that met the criteria for child maltreatment were screened out but it does show that our state, Minnesota, is an outlier nationally on this measure. We are sponsoring legislation that will require the state to report the number of children who are screened out 1,2,3...n times in a year so we can at least see patterns of multiple screen-outs. Based on small samplings in this state we have seen half of children reported five or more times, with some reported over 15 times, but there is no data on how many of those reports were screened in/out or whether those that were screened in got an assessment, an investigation or services. We believe that the fact that a child is reported many times by itself raises questions about whether child protection is responding consistent with its guidelines and the legislation we are proposing with provide an opportunity to ask those questons. One objection we frequently hear to tracking screen-outs is that multiple reports may be due to malicious reporting from a disgruntled ex-partner, a neighbor, etc. The federal report has a category of 'intentionally false' reports (Table 3-3) which indicates about 1.3% of reports fall into this group. I don't know how they determine if a report is intentionally false, and note that only 10 states reported on this measure. There is research on malicious reporting somewhere but I can't recall who authored it. If that is of particular importance I can do a search to see if I have it. Another possible source of insight is a report which we were able to get done in 2012 by our state Office of the Legislative Auditor http://www.auditor.leg.state.mn.us/ped/2012/screening.htm. This documented widely varying standards for what is considered to be abuse and neglect in Minnesota, which is a state supervised/county administered state. Again this doesn't give percentages but it does document situations in which children would be screened in for service in some counties but not other. Rich Gehrman Rich Gehrman Executive Director Safe Passage for Children of Minnesota 2148 Eleanor Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55116 www.safepassagemn.org (651) 303-3209 gehrm001@umn.edu -----Original Message----- From: bounce-115190069-44670726@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-115190069-44670726@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Laurel Edinburgh Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2014 12:22 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Re: child maltreatment investigations Dear Aron, The Minneapolis Star Tribune published an article about this. They looked at each county in MN at the number of reports and the number of reports that were opened. Huge variability. Laurel >>> Aron Shlonsky 05/06/14 12:04 PM >>> Hi all, We are looking for any reports or articles that discuss the rate at which families who are reported for maltreatment AND meet their jurisdictional criteria for investigation are actually investigated for child maltreatment (or at least the children are physically seen by a child protection worker). Again, not looking for the rate that reports are investigated. Looking for the rate that reports that should be investigated actually are investigated. Any help would be much appreciated! Aron Shlonsky, MSW, MPH, PhD Professor of Evidence-Informed Practice Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia +61 3 9035 9754 aron.shlonsky@unimelb.edu.au Confidentiality Statement: This email/fax, including attachments, may include confidential and/or proprietary information and may be used only by the person or entity to which it is addressed. If the reader of this email/fax is not the intended recipient or his or her agent, the reader is hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this email/fax is prohibited. If you have received this email/fax in error, please notify the sender by replying to this message and deleting this email or destroying this facsimile immediately.

Aron, The source of the information reported in the Minneapolis Star Tribune is the 2012 Child Maltreatment report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-resea rch/child-maltreatment. This report shows the rate at which states screen in reports of child maltreatment, called 'referrals' in at the federal level. This doesn't get at the question of whether 'referrals' that met the criteria for child maltreatment were screened out but it does show that our state, Minnesota, is an outlier nationally on this measure. We are sponsoring legislation that will require the state to report the number of children who are screened out 1,2,3...n times in a year so we can at least see patterns of multiple screen-outs. Based on small samplings in this state we have seen half of children reported five or more times, with some reported over 15 times, but there is no data on how many of those reports were screened in/out or whether those that were screened in got an assessment, an investigation or services. We believe that the fact that a child is reported many times by itself raises questions about whether child protection is responding consistent with its guidelines and the legislation we are proposing with provide an opportunity to ask those questons. One objection we frequently hear to tracking screen-outs is that multiple reports may be due to malicious reporting from a disgruntled ex-partner, a neighbor, etc. The federal report has a category of 'intentionally false' reports (Table 3-3) which indicates about 1.3% of reports fall into this group. I don't know how they determine if a report is intentionally false, and note that only 10 states reported on this measure. There is research on malicious reporting somewhere but I can't recall who authored it. If that is of particular importance I can do a search to see if I have it. Another possible source of insight is a report which we were able to get done in 2012 by our state Office of the Legislative Auditor http://www.auditor.leg.state.mn.us/ped/2012/screening.htm. This documented widely varying standards for what is considered to be abuse and neglect in Minnesota, which is a state supervised/county administered state. Again this doesn't give percentages but it does document situations in which children would be screened in for service in some counties but not other. Rich Gehrman Rich Gehrman Executive Director Safe Passage for Children of Minnesota 2148 Eleanor Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55116 www.safepassagemn.org (651) 303-3209 gehrm001umn.edu -----Original Message----- From: bounce-115190069-44670726list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-115190069-44670726list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Laurel Edinburgh Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2014 12:22 PM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Re: child maltreatment investigations Dear Aron, The Minneapolis Star Tribune published an article about this. They looked at each county in MN at the number of reports and the number of reports that were opened. Huge variability. Laurel >>> Aron Shlonsky 05/06/14 12:04 PM >>> Hi all, We are looking for any reports or articles that discuss the rate at which families who are reported for maltreatment AND meet their jurisdictional criteria for investigation are actually investigated for child maltreatment (or at least the children are physically seen by a child protection worker). Again, not looking for the rate that reports are investigated. Looking for the rate that reports that should be investigated actually are investigated. Any help would be much appreciated! Aron Shlonsky, MSW, MPH, PhD Professor of Evidence-Informed Practice Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia +61 3 9035 9754 aron.shlonskyunimelb.edu.au Confidentiality Statement: This email/fax, including attachments, may include confidential and/or proprietary information and may be used only by the person or entity to which it is addressed. If the reader of this email/fax is not the intended recipient or his or her agent, the reader is hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this email/fax is prohibited. If you have received this email/fax in error, please notify the sender by replying to this message and deleting this email or destroying this facsimile immediately.