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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9637
Date: 2014-05-06

Author:Brodowski, Melissa (ACF)

Subject:FYI: ACYF Neuroscience and Child Maltreatment Expert Panel: SRCD Social Policy Report

FYI – Many thanks to Caryn Blitz from ACYF and Cheryl Boyce from NIDA for sharing. My apologies for the duplicate posting for some of you. The direct link to the special issue is below: http://www.srcd.org/sites/default/files/documents/spr_28_1.pdf From: Blitz, Caryn (ACF) Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2014 10:03 AM Subject: ACYF Neuroscience & Child Maltreatment Expert Panel: SRCD Social Policy Report Importance: High The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) has released the Social Policy Report, The Biological Embedding of Child Abuse and Neglect: Implications for Policy and Practice. This report was developed in collaboration with members of ACYF’s Neuroscience and Child Maltreatment Expert Panel and ACYF’s partners at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Health and Human Development. Caryn Blitz, Ph.D. Office of the Commissioner Office on Data, Analysis, Research & Evaluation Administration on Children, Youth & Families Administration for Children & Families US Department of Health & Human Services 1250 Maryland Avenue, SW, #8411 Washington, DC 20024 P: (202) 401-9225 F: (202) 205-9721 E: Caryn.Blitz@acf.hhs.gov Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser . sharing child and youth development knowledge volume 28, number 1 2014 Social Policy Report The Biological Embedding of Child Abuse and Neglect Implications for Policy and Practice Sara R. Jaffee University of Pennsylvania Kings’s College London Cindy W. Christian University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Abstract Each year within the US alone over 770,000 children are victimized by abuse and neglect (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010), and this figure is likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. Researchers have long recognized that maltreatment has adverse effects on children’s mental health and academic achievement. Studies of adults show that adverse childhood experiences like maltreatment increase risk for chronic diseases of aging, including Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. What the field does not fully understand is why maltreatment has such pervasive effects. Studies on the neuroscience of maltreatment have begun to offer some clues. Victims of maltreatment differ from non-victims with respect to brain structure and function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system function, immune function, and epigenetic markers. These studies identify potential mechanisms by which maltreatment increases risk for poor mental and physical health and poor school performance by affecting systems that subserve memory, attention, the response to stress, and inflammation. The findings highlight the importance of broadening the scope of child welfare beyond child protection to include child wellbeing. A focus on child well-being would require integrated services, wherein comprehensive mental and physical health care are routinely offered to victims of maltreatment and case workers, pediatricians, and psychologists would work as teams to determine how best to deliver care to children and families in the child welfare system. In working with the family, such efforts could potentially reduce the risk of re-victimization which commonly jeopardizes long-term gains in child well-being. [more ] View Full Version of This Issue Social Policy Report Editorial Team Samuel L. Odom, Ph.D. (Lead Editor) slodom@unc.edu Iheoma Iruka, Ph.D. (Issue Editor) iruka@unc.edu Kelly Maxwell, Ph.D. kmaxwell@childtrends.org Leslie Fox (Assistant Editor) lcfox@live.unc.edu © Society for Research in Child Development Phone: (734) 926-0600 | Fax: (734) 926-0601 | Email: info@srcd.org SRCD Home | Forward to a Friend | Unsubscribe

FYI – Many thanks to Caryn Blitz from ACYF and Cheryl Boyce from NIDA for sharing. My apologies for the duplicate posting for some of you. The direct link to the special issue is below: http://www.srcd.org/sites/default/files/documents/spr_28_1.pdf From: Blitz, Caryn (ACF) Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2014 10:03 AM Subject: ACYF Neuroscience & Child Maltreatment Expert Panel: SRCD Social Policy Report Importance: High The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) has released the Social Policy Report, The Biological Embedding of Child Abuse and Neglect: Implications for Policy and Practice. This report was developed in collaboration with members of ACYF’s Neuroscience and Child Maltreatment Expert Panel and ACYF’s partners at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Health and Human Development. Caryn Blitz, Ph.D. Office of the Commissioner Office on Data, Analysis, Research & Evaluation Administration on Children, Youth & Families Administration for Children & Families US Department of Health & Human Services 1250 Maryland Avenue, SW, #8411 Washington, DC 20024 P: (202) 401-9225 F: (202) 205-9721 E: Caryn.Blitzacf.hhs.gov Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser . sharing child and youth development knowledge volume 28, number 1 2014 Social Policy Report The Biological Embedding of Child Abuse and Neglect Implications for Policy and Practice Sara R. Jaffee University of Pennsylvania Kings’s College London Cindy W. Christian University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Abstract Each year within the US alone over 770,000 children are victimized by abuse and neglect (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010), and this figure is likely to underestimate the extent of the problem. Researchers have long recognized that maltreatment has adverse effects on children’s mental health and academic achievement. Studies of adults show that adverse childhood experiences like maltreatment increase risk for chronic diseases of aging, including Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. What the field does not fully understand is why maltreatment has such pervasive effects. Studies on the neuroscience of maltreatment have begun to offer some clues. Victims of maltreatment differ from non-victims with respect to brain structure and function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system function, immune function, and epigenetic markers. These studies identify potential mechanisms by which maltreatment increases risk for poor mental and physical health and poor school performance by affecting systems that subserve memory, attention, the response to stress, and inflammation. The findings highlight the importance of broadening the scope of child welfare beyond child protection to include child wellbeing. A focus on child well-being would require integrated services, wherein comprehensive mental and physical health care are routinely offered to victims of maltreatment and case workers, pediatricians, and psychologists would work as teams to determine how best to deliver care to children and families in the child welfare system. In working with the family, such efforts could potentially reduce the risk of re-victimization which commonly jeopardizes long-term gains in child well-being. [more ] View Full Version of This Issue Social Policy Report Editorial Team Samuel L. Odom, Ph.D. (Lead Editor) slodomunc.edu Iheoma Iruka, Ph.D. (Issue Editor) irukaunc.edu Kelly Maxwell, Ph.D. kmaxwellchildtrends.org Leslie Fox (Assistant Editor) lcfoxlive.unc.edu © Society for Research in Child Development Phone: (734) 926-0600 | Fax: (734) 926-0601 | Email: infosrcd.org SRCD Home | Forward to a Friend | Unsubscribe