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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9603
Date: 2014-04-04

Author:Rich Gehrman

Subject:RE: *URGENT* NSCAW Support

In terms of the impact on the field, as a citizens' advocacy organization we rely heavily on federal data including from the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect to make our case for improvements to and reinvestments in the child welfare system. The material that Bryan Samuels developed, which apparently relied on the NSCAW data, is the central part of our presentations to legislators and other thought leaders in Minnesota. The principle they buy into, in a non-partisan way, is 'if you can't measure it you can't manage it'. I believe data is already too hard to come by to lose any signficant source. I don't see a bright line between research and practice, it's all part of making the case for children. Rich Gehrman Executive Director Safe Passage for Children of Minnesota 2148 Eleanor Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55116 www.safepassagemn.org (651) 303-3209 gehrm001@umn.edu -----Original Message----- From: bounce-114017038-44670726@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-114017038-44670726@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Nadia Sexton Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 11:15 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: *URGENT* NSCAW Support Well just a thought: to the extent that the Federal (inc not limited to acyf) well being conversation, related regulations, and IM have influenced the direction of the field (for example, I don't think there's a single IVe waiver application (and quite likely more than half the nation's child welfare field staff will be involved in a waiver within the next year) without the phrase well being.....much more than a mere phrase usually)....the lexicon and interest was shaped in some measure by the repeated presentation of NSCAW data by then-Commissioner Bryan Samuels and others. Other data sets were important and equally relied upon but I posit that the ability of child welfare to use it's own data to shape an ambitious, timely, and much needed agenda for the field demonstrates the value of NSCAW quite handily. As I say, just a roughly hammered thought.... Nadezhda Sexton, PhD Knowledge Management, Director 201.565.7676 On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:36 AM, "Glenn Higgins" > wrote: We are clearly talking two different languages here and perhaps that is the problem. From the field, I am talking about impact on the child welfare system. You are counting publications. A classic disconnecct. I am going to guess that the budget for NSCAW is well above 100 million. What has improved other than the national sample? I think identifying those specific improvements that are directly connected to the research will better support your (our) arguement for continued funding. GH On Friday, April 4, 2014 11:04 AM, diane wach > wrote: You can find a collection of the research published using NSCAW data here, with links to full text (access to text is based on your organization's journal subscriptions): http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW There are approximately 400 publications with 230 published in peer-reviewed journals. Also, you can find a listing of NSCAW 1 citations here: http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW-1 And NSCAW 2 citations here: http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW-2 -diane Diane Wach, MA, MSEd, LPC dianewach.weebly.com Research Analyst Doctoral Student in Human Development National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research College of Human Ecology Cornell University 607.255.2543 On Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 10:11 AM, Leah Bruns > wrote: I just happen to be looking at this document: http://cssr.berkeley.edu/cwscmsreports/ppts/Annotated%20Bibliography%20-%20G rid%20of%20Systemic%20Implications.pdf It cites multiple Child Welfare specific research articles & books several using NSCAW data and directly relating to Child Welfare practice. -Leah Bruns On Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 9:49 AM, Glenn Higgins > wrote: Keith Thanks for the update. Given you are asking people to support your efforts, can you say a little more about how the renewed funding will be spent? You asked for grassroots efforts/support from the field. I always had the impression that NSCAW was a large mental health study and did very little to inform the field of practice. Even the key findings you note in the attached letters seem to restate findings that have been known decades. Perhaps you can point us to specific improvements in the child welfare system (in the field) that have emerged from the analysis of NSCAW data. I know I would find that very helpful. These actual improvements should be noted in the letters to our elected officials. Glenn On Friday, April 4, 2014 7:35 AM, "Smith, Keith R." > wrote: Dear Child Maltreatment Researcher, I'm contacting you about an urgent legislative matter. I am not sure if you are aware that the Administration of Children and Families (ACF) is at this moment desperately trying to sustain funding that supports a vital data source, the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). NSCAW is a nationally representative survey that enables ACF, along with researchers across multiple disciplines committed to improving outcomes for vulnerable children, to monitor the health, mental health - including trauma, development, and well-being of infants, children, and youth served by the child welfare system. NSCAW has been critical for informing current policies about children's unmet needs - particularly the dearth of evidence-based intervention for this population. ACF is requesting funding in the FY 2015 budget for NSCAW - and that the funding is in serious jeopardy of being cut without grassroots support from the field attesting to the need for this important survey. I am reaching out to you to see if it's possible to spread the word to colleagues in the Network about the need for letters in support of NSCAW. Letters of support urging representatives in the House and Senate to fund NSCAW are needed by this Friday, April 4. Letters of support should be emailed to Dr. Cecilia Casanueva at ccasanueva@rti.org. Dr. Casanueva, along with other leading policy researchers and child advocates across the country, are collecting these letters of support to submit to the key representatives involved with the budget process. I've attached a template of letters of support, as well as a one-page overview of NSCAW. Of course, if folks are moved to send letters to their state reps, that would be very helpful as well. You can find contact information for your House representative at http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/ and for your Senators at http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm. Thanks for your help! Sincerely, Keith R. Smith

In terms of the impact on the field, as a citizens' advocacy organization we rely heavily on federal data including from the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect to make our case for improvements to and reinvestments in the child welfare system. The material that Bryan Samuels developed, which apparently relied on the NSCAW data, is the central part of our presentations to legislators and other thought leaders in Minnesota. The principle they buy into, in a non-partisan way, is 'if you can't measure it you can't manage it'. I believe data is already too hard to come by to lose any signficant source. I don't see a bright line between research and practice, it's all part of making the case for children. Rich Gehrman Executive Director Safe Passage for Children of Minnesota 2148 Eleanor Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55116 www.safepassagemn.org (651) 303-3209 gehrm001umn.edu -----Original Message----- From: bounce-114017038-44670726list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-114017038-44670726list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Nadia Sexton Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 11:15 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: *URGENT* NSCAW Support Well just a thought: to the extent that the Federal (inc not limited to acyf) well being conversation, related regulations, and IM have influenced the direction of the field (for example, I don't think there's a single IVe waiver application (and quite likely more than half the nation's child welfare field staff will be involved in a waiver within the next year) without the phrase well being.....much more than a mere phrase usually)....the lexicon and interest was shaped in some measure by the repeated presentation of NSCAW data by then-Commissioner Bryan Samuels and others. Other data sets were important and equally relied upon but I posit that the ability of child welfare to use it's own data to shape an ambitious, timely, and much needed agenda for the field demonstrates the value of NSCAW quite handily. As I say, just a roughly hammered thought.... Nadezhda Sexton, PhD Knowledge Management, Director 201.565.7676 On Apr 4, 2014, at 11:36 AM, "Glenn Higgins" > wrote: We are clearly talking two different languages here and perhaps that is the problem. From the field, I am talking about impact on the child welfare system. You are counting publications. A classic disconnecct. I am going to guess that the budget for NSCAW is well above 100 million. What has improved other than the national sample? I think identifying those specific improvements that are directly connected to the research will better support your (our) arguement for continued funding. GH On Friday, April 4, 2014 11:04 AM, diane wach > wrote: You can find a collection of the research published using NSCAW data here, with links to full text (access to text is based on your organization's journal subscriptions): http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW There are approximately 400 publications with 230 published in peer-reviewed journals. Also, you can find a listing of NSCAW 1 citations here: http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW-1 And NSCAW 2 citations here: http://www.refworks.com.proxy.library.cornell.edu/refshare2?site=01027113591 8800000/RWWS5A10943/NSCAW-2 -diane Diane Wach, MA, MSEd, LPC dianewach.weebly.com Research Analyst Doctoral Student in Human Development National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research College of Human Ecology Cornell University 607.255.2543 On Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 10:11 AM, Leah Bruns > wrote: I just happen to be looking at this document: http://cssr.berkeley.edu/cwscmsreports/ppts/Annotated%20Bibliography%20-%20G rid%20of%20Systemic%20Implications.pdf It cites multiple Child Welfare specific research articles & books several using NSCAW data and directly relating to Child Welfare practice. -Leah Bruns On Fri, Apr 4, 2014 at 9:49 AM, Glenn Higgins > wrote: Keith Thanks for the update. Given you are asking people to support your efforts, can you say a little more about how the renewed funding will be spent? You asked for grassroots efforts/support from the field. I always had the impression that NSCAW was a large mental health study and did very little to inform the field of practice. Even the key findings you note in the attached letters seem to restate findings that have been known decades. Perhaps you can point us to specific improvements in the child welfare system (in the field) that have emerged from the analysis of NSCAW data. I know I would find that very helpful. These actual improvements should be noted in the letters to our elected officials. Glenn On Friday, April 4, 2014 7:35 AM, "Smith, Keith R." > wrote: Dear Child Maltreatment Researcher, I'm contacting you about an urgent legislative matter. I am not sure if you are aware that the Administration of Children and Families (ACF) is at this moment desperately trying to sustain funding that supports a vital data source, the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). NSCAW is a nationally representative survey that enables ACF, along with researchers across multiple disciplines committed to improving outcomes for vulnerable children, to monitor the health, mental health - including trauma, development, and well-being of infants, children, and youth served by the child welfare system. NSCAW has been critical for informing current policies about children's unmet needs - particularly the dearth of evidence-based intervention for this population. ACF is requesting funding in the FY 2015 budget for NSCAW - and that the funding is in serious jeopardy of being cut without grassroots support from the field attesting to the need for this important survey. I am reaching out to you to see if it's possible to spread the word to colleagues in the Network about the need for letters in support of NSCAW. Letters of support urging representatives in the House and Senate to fund NSCAW are needed by this Friday, April 4. Letters of support should be emailed to Dr. Cecilia Casanueva at ccasanuevarti.org. Dr. Casanueva, along with other leading policy researchers and child advocates across the country, are collecting these letters of support to submit to the key representatives involved with the budget process. I've attached a template of letters of support, as well as a one-page overview of NSCAW. Of course, if folks are moved to send letters to their state reps, that would be very helpful as well. You can find contact information for your House representative at http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/ and for your Senators at http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm. Thanks for your help! Sincerely, Keith R. Smith