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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9377
Date: 2013-02-12

Author:Joan Crowley

Subject:Re: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse

In New Mexico, CPS deals only with family perpetrators of child abuse. Teachers have special limitations in terms of sexual abuse of children. It's hard to see how school personnel would be guilty of child neglect. Teachers using physical force against a child would be subject to discipline from the school district, even without prosecution. The greater threat, frankly, is students attacking teachers. Teachers should not be singled out more than others with responsibility for child welfare. Gotta run to class, or I'd write more. Joan Crowley New Mexico State University On Feb 12, 2013, at 8:31 AM, Rebecca Robuck wrote: We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebecca@childfocuspartners.com <7A2A8FFA-C4BE-4D9C-B998-394BA5804387[179].png> <7A2A8FFA-C4BE-4D9C-B998-394BA5804387[179].png>

In New Mexico, CPS deals only with family perpetrators of child abuse. Teachers have special limitations in terms of sexual abuse of children. It's hard to see how school personnel would be guilty of child neglect. Teachers using physical force against a child would be subject to discipline from the school district, even without prosecution. The greater threat, frankly, is students attacking teachers. Teachers should not be singled out more than others with responsibility for child welfare. Gotta run to class, or I'd write more. Joan Crowley New Mexico State University On Feb 12, 2013, at 8:31 AM, Rebecca Robuck wrote: We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebeccachildfocuspartners.com <7A2A8FFA-C4BE-4D9C-B998-394BA5804387[179].png> <7A2A8FFA-C4BE-4D9C-B998-394BA5804387[179].png>