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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9376
Date: 2013-02-20

Author:McLeod, Sandra

Subject:RE: TANF question

Some current, relevant titles that may be of interest to you: State Approaches to the TANF Block Grant: Welfare Is Not What You Think It Is. Working Families ; Paper 20. Hahn, Heather. Golden, Olivia. Stanczyk, Alexandra. The Urban Institute. Low-Income Working Families Project. 2012 The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant is a broad funding stream that allows states to make greatly divergent policy decisions, with vastly different implications for each state's low-income families. This paper examines how state goals, policies, and expenditure decisions contribute to unique pictures of TANF in California, Florida, Michigan, Texas, and Washington. The paper examines not only cash assistance, but also states' overall approaches to the block grant. Further, the paper studies how state TANF programs responded to new federal requirements (the Deficit Reduction Act) and funding (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), and to the recession. Findings indicate that most TANF funds are spent outside of traditional cash assistance. A major theme of state spending on TANF is that resources are transferred to other programs. In this paper we focus on transfers to child welfare (that is, services to abused and neglected children) as one of the largest examples of these shifts. Nationally, TANF makes up about 19 percent of federal spending on child welfare services, although variations are great between states and over time within the same state. Among the five study states, Texas uses TANF dollars for child welfare far more aggressively than the typical state, devoting more than half the state's TANF and MOE spending to child welfare. Michigan's child welfare program also relies heavily on TANF funds, with close to 40 percent of that state's federal funding for child welfare coming from TANF. The other states are more typical of national patterns. State decisions to transfer TANF funds to child welfare often reflect a mix of issues related to child welfare needs, federal child welfare funding, and TANF. A key conclusion from this study's interviews is that, although TANF and child welfare may coordinate operations or policy to some degree, the transfer of TANF funds to child welfare is a way to solve state budgetary issues and does not imply any policy connection between the two programs. (Author abstract modified) http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412635-State-Approaches-to-the-TANF-Block-Grant.pdf TANF and Child Welfare Programs: Increased Data Sharing Could Improve Access to Benefits and Services: Report to Congressional Requesters (including, States' Monthly TANF Child-Only and Foster Care Payment Rates). GAO-12-2. United States. Government Accountability Office. 2011 In 2010, over 40 percent of families receiving cash assistance through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program were "child-only," meaning the adults in the household were not included in the benefit calculation, and aid was provided only for the children. TANF and child welfare programs provide cash assistance and other services that support children living with nonparent caregivers. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration for Children and Families (ACF) oversees TANF and child welfare programs, which are administered by states. GAO was asked to examine the (1) trends and composition of the child-only caseload, (2) characteristics of caregivers and children in nonparent child-only cases, (3) factors influencing the level of benefits and services for children with non-parent caregivers, and (4) coordination efforts between state TANF and child welfare programs. GAO analyzed federal TANF and child welfare data; surveyed states; interviewed HHS officials and researchers; and conducted site visits in Tennessee, Texas, and Washington, selected for variation in TANF caseload characteristics and implementation of programs to support relative caregivers. (Author abstract) http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d122.pdf TANF Child-Only Cases: Who Are They? What Policies Affect Them? What Is Being Done? Mauldon, Jane. Speiglman, Richard. Sogar, Christina. Stagner, Matt. Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. United States. Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. United States. Department of Health and Human Service. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 2012 Child-only cases were far from the center of attention when the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program was created in 1996, and even when it was reauthorized in 2005. However, with adult-aided cases at less than one-quarter of their pre-TANF levels, child-only cases have become a substantial presence in the nation’s TANF caseload, and interest in these cases is growing. In 2011 child-only cases represented about two in every five TANF cases. Child-only TANF aid reaches a diverse mix of children, including children living in the homes of relatives, children of parents who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and U.S-born children of parents whose immigration status renders the parents ineligible for TANF benefits. These groups have little or nothing in common with each other. They also have little in common with adult-aided TANF recipients. Most crucially, child-only cases are not subject to the federal and state program rules that have driven down TANF caseloads since TANF’s inception in 1996. This report is written to aid policy makers as they contemplate modifications to TANF. It has three goals: to describe child-only policies and explore how these policies create and shape the three distinct child-only caseloads; to provide information about the needs of the children and adults in the households that receive child-only aid; and to situate child-only TANF policy in the context of other relevant policies. Among the relevant trends are shifts in foster care policy (which can affect NPC child-only TANF caseloads), patterns of immigrant location within the United States (which influence IIP child-only caseloads), and the availability of SSI aid for low-income parents. This report emphasizes the fact that policy changes to TANF must address child-only cases, paying explicit attention to each of the four TANF caseloads separately & the three child-only caseloads referenced above plus adult-aided cases. The authors of this report provide recommendations for policymakers to improve TANF aid to child-only cases. http://www.chapinhall.org/sites/default/files/TANF_ChildOnly_0.pdf Sandi McLeod Child Welfare Technical Specialist Child Welfare Information Gateway A Service of the Children’s Bureau/ACF/HHS Email: smcleod@childwelfare.gov Website: www.childwelfare.gov Free Subscriptions: http://www.childwelfare.gov/admin/subscribe/ From: bounce-74350402-6834017@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-74350402-6834017@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Jennifer Lawson Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 2:11 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: TANF question I haven't updated this in a couple years, but here are some sources I have compiled on this topic. There may be more recent works out there. -- Jennifer Lawson, MSSW, Ph.D. Candidate School of Social Welfare University of California, Berkeley Billings, P., Moore, T.D., & McDonald, T.P. (2003). What do we know about the relationship between public welfare and child welfare? Children and Youth Services Review, 25(8), 633-650. Courtney, M.E., Dworsky, A., Piliavin, I., & McMurtry, S. (2008) Comparing welfare and child welfare populations: an argument for rethinking the safety net. In D. Lindsey and A. Shlonsky (Eds.), Child welfare research: Advances for practice and policy (271-290). New York: Oxford University Press. Courtney, M.E, Dworsky, A., Piliavin, I., & Zinn, A. (2005). Involvement of TANF applicant families with child welfare services. Social Service Review, 79(1), 119-157. Dworsky, A., Courtney, M.E., & Zinn, A. (2007). Child, parent, and family predictors of child welfare services among TANF applicant families. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 802-820. Waldfogel, J. (2004). Welfare reform and the child welfare system. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 919-939. On Sun, Feb 17, 2013 at 9:28 PM, Traci LaLiberte > wrote: Can anyone point me to recent published works, or researchers which/who cite or identifies prevalence estimates of families who are involved in child welfare and also receiving TANF? Much appreciated. Traci -- Traci LaLiberte, Ph.D. Executive Director Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare University of Minnesota 1404 Gortner Ave. 205 Peters Hall St. Paul, MN. 55104 612-624-2279 lali0017@umn.edu

Some current, relevant titles that may be of interest to you: State Approaches to the TANF Block Grant: Welfare Is Not What You Think It Is. Working Families ; Paper 20. Hahn, Heather. Golden, Olivia. Stanczyk, Alexandra. The Urban Institute. Low-Income Working Families Project. 2012 The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant is a broad funding stream that allows states to make greatly divergent policy decisions, with vastly different implications for each state's low-income families. This paper examines how state goals, policies, and expenditure decisions contribute to unique pictures of TANF in California, Florida, Michigan, Texas, and Washington. The paper examines not only cash assistance, but also states' overall approaches to the block grant. Further, the paper studies how state TANF programs responded to new federal requirements (the Deficit Reduction Act) and funding (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), and to the recession. Findings indicate that most TANF funds are spent outside of traditional cash assistance. A major theme of state spending on TANF is that resources are transferred to other programs. In this paper we focus on transfers to child welfare (that is, services to abused and neglected children) as one of the largest examples of these shifts. Nationally, TANF makes up about 19 percent of federal spending on child welfare services, although variations are great between states and over time within the same state. Among the five study states, Texas uses TANF dollars for child welfare far more aggressively than the typical state, devoting more than half the state's TANF and MOE spending to child welfare. Michigan's child welfare program also relies heavily on TANF funds, with close to 40 percent of that state's federal funding for child welfare coming from TANF. The other states are more typical of national patterns. State decisions to transfer TANF funds to child welfare often reflect a mix of issues related to child welfare needs, federal child welfare funding, and TANF. A key conclusion from this study's interviews is that, although TANF and child welfare may coordinate operations or policy to some degree, the transfer of TANF funds to child welfare is a way to solve state budgetary issues and does not imply any policy connection between the two programs. (Author abstract modified) http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/412635-State-Approaches-to-the-TANF-Block-Grant.pdf TANF and Child Welfare Programs: Increased Data Sharing Could Improve Access to Benefits and Services: Report to Congressional Requesters (including, States' Monthly TANF Child-Only and Foster Care Payment Rates). GAO-12-2. United States. Government Accountability Office. 2011 In 2010, over 40 percent of families receiving cash assistance through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program were "child-only," meaning the adults in the household were not included in the benefit calculation, and aid was provided only for the children. TANF and child welfare programs provide cash assistance and other services that support children living with nonparent caregivers. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration for Children and Families (ACF) oversees TANF and child welfare programs, which are administered by states. GAO was asked to examine the (1) trends and composition of the child-only caseload, (2) characteristics of caregivers and children in nonparent child-only cases, (3) factors influencing the level of benefits and services for children with non-parent caregivers, and (4) coordination efforts between state TANF and child welfare programs. GAO analyzed federal TANF and child welfare data; surveyed states; interviewed HHS officials and researchers; and conducted site visits in Tennessee, Texas, and Washington, selected for variation in TANF caseload characteristics and implementation of programs to support relative caregivers. (Author abstract) http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d122.pdf TANF Child-Only Cases: Who Are They? What Policies Affect Them? What Is Being Done? Mauldon, Jane. Speiglman, Richard. Sogar, Christina. Stagner, Matt. Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. United States. Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. United States. Department of Health and Human Service. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 2012 Child-only cases were far from the center of attention when the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program was created in 1996, and even when it was reauthorized in 2005. However, with adult-aided cases at less than one-quarter of their pre-TANF levels, child-only cases have become a substantial presence in the nation’s TANF caseload, and interest in these cases is growing. In 2011 child-only cases represented about two in every five TANF cases. Child-only TANF aid reaches a diverse mix of children, including children living in the homes of relatives, children of parents who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and U.S-born children of parents whose immigration status renders the parents ineligible for TANF benefits. These groups have little or nothing in common with each other. They also have little in common with adult-aided TANF recipients. Most crucially, child-only cases are not subject to the federal and state program rules that have driven down TANF caseloads since TANF’s inception in 1996. This report is written to aid policy makers as they contemplate modifications to TANF. It has three goals: to describe child-only policies and explore how these policies create and shape the three distinct child-only caseloads; to provide information about the needs of the children and adults in the households that receive child-only aid; and to situate child-only TANF policy in the context of other relevant policies. Among the relevant trends are shifts in foster care policy (which can affect NPC child-only TANF caseloads), patterns of immigrant location within the United States (which influence IIP child-only caseloads), and the availability of SSI aid for low-income parents. This report emphasizes the fact that policy changes to TANF must address child-only cases, paying explicit attention to each of the four TANF caseloads separately & the three child-only caseloads referenced above plus adult-aided cases. The authors of this report provide recommendations for policymakers to improve TANF aid to child-only cases. http://www.chapinhall.org/sites/default/files/TANF_ChildOnly_0.pdf Sandi McLeod Child Welfare Technical Specialist Child Welfare Information Gateway A Service of the Children’s Bureau/ACF/HHS Email: smcleodchildwelfare.gov Website: www.childwelfare.gov Free Subscriptions: http://www.childwelfare.gov/admin/subscribe/ From: bounce-74350402-6834017list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-74350402-6834017list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Jennifer Lawson Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 2:11 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: TANF question I haven't updated this in a couple years, but here are some sources I have compiled on this topic. There may be more recent works out there. -- Jennifer Lawson, MSSW, Ph.D. Candidate School of Social Welfare University of California, Berkeley Billings, P., Moore, T.D., & McDonald, T.P. (2003). What do we know about the relationship between public welfare and child welfare? Children and Youth Services Review, 25(8), 633-650. Courtney, M.E., Dworsky, A., Piliavin, I., & McMurtry, S. (2008) Comparing welfare and child welfare populations: an argument for rethinking the safety net. In D. Lindsey and A. Shlonsky (Eds.), Child welfare research: Advances for practice and policy (271-290). New York: Oxford University Press. Courtney, M.E, Dworsky, A., Piliavin, I., & Zinn, A. (2005). Involvement of TANF applicant families with child welfare services. Social Service Review, 79(1), 119-157. Dworsky, A., Courtney, M.E., & Zinn, A. (2007). Child, parent, and family predictors of child welfare services among TANF applicant families. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 802-820. Waldfogel, J. (2004). Welfare reform and the child welfare system. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 919-939. On Sun, Feb 17, 2013 at 9:28 PM, Traci LaLiberte > wrote: Can anyone point me to recent published works, or researchers which/who cite or identifies prevalence estimates of families who are involved in child welfare and also receiving TANF? Much appreciated. Traci -- Traci LaLiberte, Ph.D. Executive Director Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare University of Minnesota 1404 Gortner Ave. 205 Peters Hall St. Paul, MN. 55104 612-624-2279 lali0017umn.edu