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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9363
Date: 2013-02-06

Author:Brodowski, Melissa (ACF)

Subject:Re: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention?

Hi Scott — Thanks for a great question (and really one that I think we're all still working on!) I agree that we definitely need to include other indicators around reducing risk factors and promoting protective factors, in addition to the official CPS reports, to measure child maltreatment prevention efforts. Thanks Sacha for highlighting the work of the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood (QIC-EC). The Center for the Study of Social Policy is our grantee leading this work. Here's a link to the report that Child Trends did for the QIC-EC on this topic: http://www.qic-ec.org/resources/papers . I am literally in a meeting this week with the QIC-EC and just talking about the need for more validated measures around protective factors. I also suggest looking at the work that Lisbeth Schorr and others did a few years ago on the Pathways Mapping Project, one of them was about the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect which is now available here: http://www.cssp.org/publications/pathways-to-outcomes I also think there are relevant indicators for the new Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) that you might want to consider. Although one of the benchmark areas is specific to prevention of child injuries and child maltreatment (and includes CM referrals, substantiations, and first time victims), there are other indicators in the other benchmark areas related to school readiness, maternal and child health, family self-sufficiency, etc. that are also good indicators for making the case collectively about child maltreatment prevention. All the state grantees are required to report on these benchmark areas as you probably know. Here's a link to various resources developed by the DOHVE TA Center that supports the MIECHV grantees that outlines the benchmarks areas and lists instruments that can be used to measure them: http://www.mdrc.org/dohve-project-resources . For others interested in learning more about the MIECHV program and grantees, visit: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/programs/homevisiting/ I hope these are helpful! Melissa Melissa Lim Brodowski, PhD, MSW, MPH Senior Child Welfare Program Specialist Office on Child Abuse and Neglect Children's Bureau Administration for Children and Families, ACYF 1250 Maryland Ave., SW #8111 Washington, DC 20024 phone: 202-205-2629 fax: 202-260-9345 email: melissa.brodowski@acf.hhs.gov From: Sacha Klein > Date: Monday, February 4, 2013 9:55 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Cc: Child Researchers >, Melissa Brodowski >, Charlyn Harper-Browne > Subject: Re: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention? Scott, Although it doesn't solve the problem entirely, I'd encourage you to measure referrals (not just substantiated referrals) as an additional measure of maltreatment since so many subjects of unsubstantiated referrals end up coming back to the system later with substantiated referrals and referred children tend to have outcomes similar to those of substantiated children. Also, I believe Timothy Ross and Sharon Vandivere at Child Trends, as well as others involved in the Quality Improvement Center for Early Childhood, have done some work compiling a list of suggested child maltreatment prevention indicators. I don't have the list handy, but you might want to reach out to them. Sacha Sacha Klein, M.S.W., Ph.D. Assistant Professor School of Social Work Michigan State University Baker Hall 655 Auditorium Road, Room 246 East Lansing, MI 48824 kleinsa@msu.edu (517) 432-3736 [office] (734) 985-0548 [cell] *Please consider the environment before printing this email. On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 7:29 PM, Bates - CDPHE, Scott > wrote: Hi all- I sit on our Early Childhood Leadership Coalition here in Colorado and we are looking for better, more positive, indicators of the primary prevention of child maltreatment. We currently use county rates of substantiated child maltreatment as an indicator and, as you may imagine, those rates are subject to too many local factors (e.g., case worker training, worker caseloads, etc.) to be comparable from county to county (our child welfare system is county-administered, state-supervised). I've looked at the data collected and am considering an indicator of new involvements as a function of child population (but I'm no epidemiologist or statistician, either!). Does anyone consider better indicators to measure child safety from maltreatment? Ideas regarding positively-worded indicators are especially welcome. Thanks! -Scott -- Scott Bates, MSW Program Manager Child Maltreatment Prevention Unit (Colorado Children's Trust Fund and Family Resource Centers) Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment scott.bates@state.co.us w (303) 692-2942 f (303) 691-7901

Hi Scott — Thanks for a great question (and really one that I think we're all still working on!) I agree that we definitely need to include other indicators around reducing risk factors and promoting protective factors, in addition to the official CPS reports, to measure child maltreatment prevention efforts. Thanks Sacha for highlighting the work of the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood (QIC-EC). The Center for the Study of Social Policy is our grantee leading this work. Here's a link to the report that Child Trends did for the QIC-EC on this topic: http://www.qic-ec.org/resources/papers . I am literally in a meeting this week with the QIC-EC and just talking about the need for more validated measures around protective factors. I also suggest looking at the work that Lisbeth Schorr and others did a few years ago on the Pathways Mapping Project, one of them was about the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect which is now available here: http://www.cssp.org/publications/pathways-to-outcomes I also think there are relevant indicators for the new Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) that you might want to consider. Although one of the benchmark areas is specific to prevention of child injuries and child maltreatment (and includes CM referrals, substantiations, and first time victims), there are other indicators in the other benchmark areas related to school readiness, maternal and child health, family self-sufficiency, etc. that are also good indicators for making the case collectively about child maltreatment prevention. All the state grantees are required to report on these benchmark areas as you probably know. Here's a link to various resources developed by the DOHVE TA Center that supports the MIECHV grantees that outlines the benchmarks areas and lists instruments that can be used to measure them: http://www.mdrc.org/dohve-project-resources . For others interested in learning more about the MIECHV program and grantees, visit: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/programs/homevisiting/ I hope these are helpful! Melissa Melissa Lim Brodowski, PhD, MSW, MPH Senior Child Welfare Program Specialist Office on Child Abuse and Neglect Children's Bureau Administration for Children and Families, ACYF 1250 Maryland Ave., SW #8111 Washington, DC 20024 phone: 202-205-2629 fax: 202-260-9345 email: melissa.brodowskiacf.hhs.gov From: Sacha Klein > Date: Monday, February 4, 2013 9:55 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Cc: Child Researchers >, Melissa Brodowski >, Charlyn Harper-Browne > Subject: Re: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention? Scott, Although it doesn't solve the problem entirely, I'd encourage you to measure referrals (not just substantiated referrals) as an additional measure of maltreatment since so many subjects of unsubstantiated referrals end up coming back to the system later with substantiated referrals and referred children tend to have outcomes similar to those of substantiated children. Also, I believe Timothy Ross and Sharon Vandivere at Child Trends, as well as others involved in the Quality Improvement Center for Early Childhood, have done some work compiling a list of suggested child maltreatment prevention indicators. I don't have the list handy, but you might want to reach out to them. Sacha Sacha Klein, M.S.W., Ph.D. Assistant Professor School of Social Work Michigan State University Baker Hall 655 Auditorium Road, Room 246 East Lansing, MI 48824 kleinsamsu.edu (517) 432-3736 [office] (734) 985-0548 [cell] *Please consider the environment before printing this email. On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 7:29 PM, Bates - CDPHE, Scott > wrote: Hi all- I sit on our Early Childhood Leadership Coalition here in Colorado and we are looking for better, more positive, indicators of the primary prevention of child maltreatment. We currently use county rates of substantiated child maltreatment as an indicator and, as you may imagine, those rates are subject to too many local factors (e.g., case worker training, worker caseloads, etc.) to be comparable from county to county (our child welfare system is county-administered, state-supervised). I've looked at the data collected and am considering an indicator of new involvements as a function of child population (but I'm no epidemiologist or statistician, either!). Does anyone consider better indicators to measure child safety from maltreatment? Ideas regarding positively-worded indicators are especially welcome. Thanks! -Scott -- Scott Bates, MSW Program Manager Child Maltreatment Prevention Unit (Colorado Children's Trust Fund and Family Resource Centers) Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment scott.batesstate.co.us w (303) 692-2942 f (303) 691-7901