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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9353
Date: 2013-02-12

Author:Duncan, Carol S

Subject:RE: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse

> We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. In the State of Texas, teachers can absolutely be considered as perpetrators of abuse or neglect and any such incident is reported to Child Protective Services and/or law enforcement. There are provisions in CPS policy in Texas for the investigation of such reports and the release of investigation reports to the school district. In the school district where I am employed, there are also provisions for internal investigation of reports of maltreatment that do not meet the legal criteria for abuse or neglect, as defined by the Texas Family Code. This would include reports of verbal abuse, any corporal punishment of students, neglectful supervision without injury, or sexual harassment of students without sexual contact. These types of reports are usually screened out by CPS without investigation because they do not meet the criteria of “substantial harm,” so are investigated within the district. Carol S. Duncan, LCSW Manager, Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention Office Dallas Independent School District 2909 N. Buckner Boulevard., Suite 804 Dallas, TX 75228 Phone: (972) 502-4182 FAX: (972) 794-3568 E-mail: cduncan@dallasisd.org "We believe that every student must be educated in a safe, welcoming, effective and innovative learning environment; therefore, we commit to provide for safe and secure learning environments that support civility, respect, and academic achievement of all students." Confidentiality Notice: This email message, including all attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential student and/or employee information. Unauthorized use and/or disclosure is prohibited under the federal Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. §1232g, 34 CFR Part 99, 19 TAC 247.2, Texas Government Code 552.023, Texas Education Code 21.355, 29 CFR 1630.14(b)(c)). If you are not the intended recipient, you may not use, disclose, copy or disseminate this information. Please call the sender immediately or reply by email and destroy all copies of the original message, including attachments. From: bounce-73574118-12685324@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-73574118-12685324@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rebecca Robuck Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:32 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebecca@childfocuspartners.com

> We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. In the State of Texas, teachers can absolutely be considered as perpetrators of abuse or neglect and any such incident is reported to Child Protective Services and/or law enforcement. There are provisions in CPS policy in Texas for the investigation of such reports and the release of investigation reports to the school district. In the school district where I am employed, there are also provisions for internal investigation of reports of maltreatment that do not meet the legal criteria for abuse or neglect, as defined by the Texas Family Code. This would include reports of verbal abuse, any corporal punishment of students, neglectful supervision without injury, or sexual harassment of students without sexual contact. These types of reports are usually screened out by CPS without investigation because they do not meet the criteria of “substantial harm,” so are investigated within the district. Carol S. Duncan, LCSW Manager, Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention Office Dallas Independent School District 2909 N. Buckner Boulevard., Suite 804 Dallas, TX 75228 Phone: (972) 502-4182 FAX: (972) 794-3568 E-mail: cduncandallasisd.org "We believe that every student must be educated in a safe, welcoming, effective and innovative learning environment; therefore, we commit to provide for safe and secure learning environments that support civility, respect, and academic achievement of all students." Confidentiality Notice: This email message, including all attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential student and/or employee information. Unauthorized use and/or disclosure is prohibited under the federal Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. §1232g, 34 CFR Part 99, 19 TAC 247.2, Texas Government Code 552.023, Texas Education Code 21.355, 29 CFR 1630.14(b)(c)). If you are not the intended recipient, you may not use, disclose, copy or disseminate this information. Please call the sender immediately or reply by email and destroy all copies of the original message, including attachments. From: bounce-73574118-12685324list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-73574118-12685324list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rebecca Robuck Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:32 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebeccachildfocuspartners.com