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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9352
Date: 2013-02-12

Author:Marsh, Jeanne

Subject:RE: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse

Rebecca, Attached is Nevada’s Corporate Punishment policy put into effect in 2011 requiring CPS to investigate allegations of corporal punishment in the schools. The definition of corporal punishment is included and is fairly narrow. This policy only relates to teachers or school staff when the victim is not their own child or a child for whom they have primary care and custody. (I know it is obvious that a teacher who abuses their own child would be investigated as any CPS complaint or allegation.) The Corporal Punishment investigation is recorded in our SACWIS system but it is not part of the general child abuse case management flow. The “windows” are in a separate window flow base so you have to search for corporal punishment complaints, not CPS complaints/allegations. The Corporal Punishment findings therefore are never forwarded to the Central Registry. If substantiated, we report the findings to the Department of Education and CPS does not enter into a service delivery system (no case plan, service provision, etc.). We forward all allegations to LEA for their review and response, and may be simultaneous but separate from School District school police investigation. It has been a challenge for our CPS investigators to investigate corporal punishment in part because we have really focused the last few years on safety assessment, and also because we rely on our relationship with the schools to investigate general CPS allegations. Therefore, I am considering shifting the investigation to our licensing staff who investigate institutional (including child care) abuse/neglect allegations. Please let me know if you have additional questions, Jeanne Marsh, MSW, LSW Children’s Services Division Director Washoe County Department of Social Services Reno, Nevada (775) 337-4430 From: bounce-73574118-9558426@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-73574118-9558426@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rebecca Robuck Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 7:32 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebecca@childfocuspartners.com

Rebecca, Attached is Nevada’s Corporate Punishment policy put into effect in 2011 requiring CPS to investigate allegations of corporal punishment in the schools. The definition of corporal punishment is included and is fairly narrow. This policy only relates to teachers or school staff when the victim is not their own child or a child for whom they have primary care and custody. (I know it is obvious that a teacher who abuses their own child would be investigated as any CPS complaint or allegation.) The Corporal Punishment investigation is recorded in our SACWIS system but it is not part of the general child abuse case management flow. The “windows” are in a separate window flow base so you have to search for corporal punishment complaints, not CPS complaints/allegations. The Corporal Punishment findings therefore are never forwarded to the Central Registry. If substantiated, we report the findings to the Department of Education and CPS does not enter into a service delivery system (no case plan, service provision, etc.). We forward all allegations to LEA for their review and response, and may be simultaneous but separate from School District school police investigation. It has been a challenge for our CPS investigators to investigate corporal punishment in part because we have really focused the last few years on safety assessment, and also because we rely on our relationship with the schools to investigate general CPS allegations. Therefore, I am considering shifting the investigation to our licensing staff who investigate institutional (including child care) abuse/neglect allegations. Please let me know if you have additional questions, Jeanne Marsh, MSW, LSW Children’s Services Division Director Washoe County Department of Social Services Reno, Nevada (775) 337-4430 From: bounce-73574118-9558426list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-73574118-9558426list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Rebecca Robuck Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 7:32 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Teachers as perpetrators of child abuse We are interested in understanding whether school teachers can be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect in your states. Since all states are so different, we would appreciate any information you have on how your state approaches this issue. Specifically, if teachers are cannot be considered perpetrators of child abuse and neglect, are they treated like any other (non-perpetrator) citizen who "abuses" a child in these states that don't appear to include them as perpetrators? Stated differently, would teachers be subject only to criminal investigation (i.e., only investigated under the crimes code for child endangerment or assault, and not investigated by CPS or noted as a perpetrator in the child abuse registry)? If teachers are treated differently in any way than non-perpetrators, then we'd like to know what that standard is — whether that be labeled "institutional abuse," "student abuse," or some other type. Any insight you might have on this issue would be extremely helpful. Many thanks, Rebecca M. Robuck Senior Associate ChildFocus, Inc. 202.417.1001 www.childfocuspartners.com rebeccachildfocuspartners.com