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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9346
Date: 2013-02-06

Author:Sherra Clinton

Subject:RE: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention?

Peggy and All: Does Kristen Shook Slack have published work you could reference? Or is there contact information for her research? Thanks, Sherra Clinton, Santa Cruz County. From: bounce-72658775-8535003@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72658775-8535003@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Peggy Taylor Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 11:15 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu Subject: Re: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention? Kristen Shook Slack has done some interesting work in this area. She found that welfare sanctions and housing disruptions were the best predictors of child welfare involvement. I think this interesting in light of more recent studies that found a very low incidence of drug use among welfare recipients. That is to say, the parents who are unable to manage the paperwork and compliance expectations for welfare services are likely to be the same parents who struggle with meeting their own needs and the needs of their children. Parent trauma history, substance abuse, mental illness, and cognitive capacity can in various combinations affect parents' capacity to care for themselves and their children. These vulnerable families can grow and change with positive and consistent supports. These findings also weave into the extensive evidence of the effectiveness of early home visiting programs in mediating parenting and child safety outcomes. Measures of positive supports to parents Measures of parent participation in parent education programs Measures of parents' capacity to maintain and utilize supports Measures of child developmental milestones through home visiting programs Measures of informal supports for parents (look to Head Start research, for example) I agree with others that the numbers of referrals, or screened in reports, is a better indicator of child maltreatment than substantiated reports. Risk assessment instruments generally acknowledge that increasing numbers of reports correlate with increased risk of maltreatment. I hope that in the not too distant future, we will be thinking more in terms of strengthening parents--all parents--and less in terms of preventing child maltreatment. Poor children end up in foster care. Middle and upper class children end up as adults in a therapist's office. We can all learn to be better parents together! On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 6:29 PM, Bates - CDPHE, Scott > wrote: Hi all- I sit on our Early Childhood Leadership Coalition here in Colorado and we are looking for better, more positive, indicators of the primary prevention of child maltreatment. We currently use county rates of substantiated child maltreatment as an indicator and, as you may imagine, those rates are subject to too many local factors (e.g., case worker training, worker caseloads, etc.) to be comparable from county to county (our child welfare system is county-administered, state-supervised). I've looked at the data collected and am considering an indicator of new involvements as a function of child population (but I'm no epidemiologist or statistician, either!). Does anyone consider better indicators to measure child safety from maltreatment? Ideas regarding positively-worded indicators are especially welcome. Thanks! -Scott -- Scott Bates, MSW Program Manager Child Maltreatment Prevention Unit (Colorado Children's Trust Fund and Family Resource Centers) Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment scott.bates@state.co.us w (303) 692-2942 f (303) 691-7901

Peggy and All: Does Kristen Shook Slack have published work you could reference? Or is there contact information for her research? Thanks, Sherra Clinton, Santa Cruz County. From: bounce-72658775-8535003list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72658775-8535003list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Peggy Taylor Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 11:15 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu Subject: Re: Indicators for Primary Child Maltreatment Prevention? Kristen Shook Slack has done some interesting work in this area. She found that welfare sanctions and housing disruptions were the best predictors of child welfare involvement. I think this interesting in light of more recent studies that found a very low incidence of drug use among welfare recipients. That is to say, the parents who are unable to manage the paperwork and compliance expectations for welfare services are likely to be the same parents who struggle with meeting their own needs and the needs of their children. Parent trauma history, substance abuse, mental illness, and cognitive capacity can in various combinations affect parents' capacity to care for themselves and their children. These vulnerable families can grow and change with positive and consistent supports. These findings also weave into the extensive evidence of the effectiveness of early home visiting programs in mediating parenting and child safety outcomes. Measures of positive supports to parents Measures of parent participation in parent education programs Measures of parents' capacity to maintain and utilize supports Measures of child developmental milestones through home visiting programs Measures of informal supports for parents (look to Head Start research, for example) I agree with others that the numbers of referrals, or screened in reports, is a better indicator of child maltreatment than substantiated reports. Risk assessment instruments generally acknowledge that increasing numbers of reports correlate with increased risk of maltreatment. I hope that in the not too distant future, we will be thinking more in terms of strengthening parents--all parents--and less in terms of preventing child maltreatment. Poor children end up in foster care. Middle and upper class children end up as adults in a therapist's office. We can all learn to be better parents together! On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 6:29 PM, Bates - CDPHE, Scott > wrote: Hi all- I sit on our Early Childhood Leadership Coalition here in Colorado and we are looking for better, more positive, indicators of the primary prevention of child maltreatment. We currently use county rates of substantiated child maltreatment as an indicator and, as you may imagine, those rates are subject to too many local factors (e.g., case worker training, worker caseloads, etc.) to be comparable from county to county (our child welfare system is county-administered, state-supervised). I've looked at the data collected and am considering an indicator of new involvements as a function of child population (but I'm no epidemiologist or statistician, either!). Does anyone consider better indicators to measure child safety from maltreatment? Ideas regarding positively-worded indicators are especially welcome. Thanks! -Scott -- Scott Bates, MSW Program Manager Child Maltreatment Prevention Unit (Colorado Children's Trust Fund and Family Resource Centers) Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment scott.batesstate.co.us w (303) 692-2942 f (303) 691-7901