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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9318
Date: 2012-12-11

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: caseloads in child welfare

One passage in this publication causes me bemusement: "Although child welfare is designed to protect children from harm, ensure their well-being, help them to achieve permanency, and strengthen families (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2012), child welfare systems cannot be expected to bear the sole responsibility for a child’s well-being." For one thing, I'm not sure what "system" means in this context. In disability and child mental health advocacy, "system of care" has long been used as an (idealized) term to describe what is needed for services to be effective. Does "system" mean "agency" in this context? Second, what does "responsibility" mean? During depositions in a child welfare lawsuit pursued by a couple I know some years ago, the director of the custodial agency stated for the record that her agency was not "responsible" for the child's well-being in care (among the issues raised in the lawsuit was the allegation that the child's therapeutic foster parent permitted the child, a teenager, to "trade sex for drugs and alcohol" with men living in the same apartment building, caused injury when physically intervening with the child after such intervention had been specifically prohibited in the child's case plan except to prevent immediate harm to the child or others, and provided such poor supervision that the child was brought to undergo educational testing while intoxicated). Incidentally, the suit was eventually dismissed based on the agency's qualified immunity. I would suggest that "system"--meaning the various public agencies that are involved in custody and care of a foster child--certainly have "sole responsibility" for the child's well-being, with that responsibility includes whatever advocacy steps are needed to obtain needed services from other public and private agencies. This, by the way, would include taking the formal administrative or legal steps to secure services when a related agency improperly denies such service (an example would be formally challenging a state Medicaid denial of a service on the grounds the service serves an educational need even though the service is a component of the state's Medicaid program or the child qualifies for the service based on special health care needs criteria). Too often, when "diplomatic efforts" fail, public agencies are all too reluctant to take more serious steps. I'm not trying to be unrealistic here. But on the assumption that language shapes behavior, and my sense that here the language is ultimately more agency-protective than child-protective, I'd have worded this differently. Sheri McMahon North Dakota ________________________________ From: SMcLeod@childwelfare.gov To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: RE: caseloads in child welfare Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2012 14:04:48 +0000 Just recently, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) released a new publication, dated 2013, NASW Standards for Social Work Practice in Child Welfare, available online at http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/childwelfarestandards2012.pdf . Sandi McLeod Child Welfare Technical Specialist Child Welfare Information Gateway A Service of the Children’s Bureau/ACF/HHS Email: smcleod@childwelfare.gov Website: www.childwelfare.gov Free Subscriptions: http://www.childwelfare.gov/admin/subscribe/ From: bounce-72504697-6834017@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72504697-6834017@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Glenn Higgins Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2012 3:17 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: caseloads in child welfare It seems that the caseload standards published by CWLA have not been updated since 1999. That seems like a really long time ago. Am I just missing a more recent document? GH ________________________________ From: Connie Hayek > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 11:47 AM Subject: Re: caseloads in child welfare There is information with links to the standards of both at http://www.childwelfare.gov/management/workforce/compendium/index.cfm?event=compendium.viewAboutComp . On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 10:14 AM, Glenn Higgins > wrote: Dear List Members, can someone clarify if COA and CWLA have the same standards for foster care and protective services workers? Or do they have their own unique standards. Does anyone know what the latest standards are? Thank you for your help. GH Sincerely, Connie K. Hayek ----- Read my Blog at http://interestsofchildren.wordpress.com/ Follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/ckhayek Connect with me on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/in/conniehayek Join my Child Welfare Advocacy group on Linked In http://linkd.in/cnI4BD

One passage in this publication causes me bemusement: "Although child welfare is designed to protect children from harm, ensure their well-being, help them to achieve permanency, and strengthen families (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2012), child welfare systems cannot be expected to bear the sole responsibility for a child’s well-being." For one thing, I'm not sure what "system" means in this context. In disability and child mental health advocacy, "system of care" has long been used as an (idealized) term to describe what is needed for services to be effective. Does "system" mean "agency" in this context? Second, what does "responsibility" mean? During depositions in a child welfare lawsuit pursued by a couple I know some years ago, the director of the custodial agency stated for the record that her agency was not "responsible" for the child's well-being in care (among the issues raised in the lawsuit was the allegation that the child's therapeutic foster parent permitted the child, a teenager, to "trade sex for drugs and alcohol" with men living in the same apartment building, caused injury when physically intervening with the child after such intervention had been specifically prohibited in the child's case plan except to prevent immediate harm to the child or others, and provided such poor supervision that the child was brought to undergo educational testing while intoxicated). Incidentally, the suit was eventually dismissed based on the agency's qualified immunity. I would suggest that "system"--meaning the various public agencies that are involved in custody and care of a foster child--certainly have "sole responsibility" for the child's well-being, with that responsibility includes whatever advocacy steps are needed to obtain needed services from other public and private agencies. This, by the way, would include taking the formal administrative or legal steps to secure services when a related agency improperly denies such service (an example would be formally challenging a state Medicaid denial of a service on the grounds the service serves an educational need even though the service is a component of the state's Medicaid program or the child qualifies for the service based on special health care needs criteria). Too often, when "diplomatic efforts" fail, public agencies are all too reluctant to take more serious steps. I'm not trying to be unrealistic here. But on the assumption that language shapes behavior, and my sense that here the language is ultimately more agency-protective than child-protective, I'd have worded this differently. Sheri McMahon North Dakota ________________________________ From: SMcLeodchildwelfare.gov To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: RE: caseloads in child welfare Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2012 14:04:48 +0000 Just recently, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) released a new publication, dated 2013, NASW Standards for Social Work Practice in Child Welfare, available online at http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/childwelfarestandards2012.pdf . Sandi McLeod Child Welfare Technical Specialist Child Welfare Information Gateway A Service of the Children’s Bureau/ACF/HHS Email: smcleodchildwelfare.gov Website: www.childwelfare.gov Free Subscriptions: http://www.childwelfare.gov/admin/subscribe/ From: bounce-72504697-6834017list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72504697-6834017list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Glenn Higgins Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2012 3:17 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: caseloads in child welfare It seems that the caseload standards published by CWLA have not been updated since 1999. That seems like a really long time ago. Am I just missing a more recent document? GH ________________________________ From: Connie Hayek > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 11:47 AM Subject: Re: caseloads in child welfare There is information with links to the standards of both at http://www.childwelfare.gov/management/workforce/compendium/index.cfm?event=compendium.viewAboutComp . On Tue, Dec 4, 2012 at 10:14 AM, Glenn Higgins > wrote: Dear List Members, can someone clarify if COA and CWLA have the same standards for foster care and protective services workers? Or do they have their own unique standards. Does anyone know what the latest standards are? Thank you for your help. GH Sincerely, Connie K. Hayek ----- Read my Blog at http://interestsofchildren.wordpress.com/ Follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/ckhayek Connect with me on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/in/conniehayek Join my Child Welfare Advocacy group on Linked In http://linkd.in/cnI4BD