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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9296
Date: 2012-11-06

Author:Cheryl Fujii

Subject:RE: question about Differential Response in child welfare

The California Child Welfare Resource Library, a Division of the California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC) has a DR module posted on its website: Berrick, J. D., Bryant, M., Conley, A., de Elizalde, L., Garcia, V., Geer, A., et al. (2009). Differential Response and Alternative Response in Diverse Communities: An Empirically Based Curriculum. Traditionally, the child welfare system (CWS) has targeted families at greatest risk for child abuse or neglect, while taking no further action on cases deemed to be at low to moderate risk. However, practitioners and researchers agree that families whose mistreatment does not meet criteria for abuse still need services. Differential Response (DR) is an effort to reform this system by offering voluntary services to these families who would not qualify for services under the traditional CWS. While the specific implementation of DR varies by locality, all DR models share five general components: screening based on risk, voluntary provision of services, respectful engagement of families, community involvement, and a focus on prevention. There is some controversy over classifying these services as voluntary. Sometimes CWS is notified if families refuse services or families may perceive this to be the case. Whether or not the services are truly voluntary may impact client motivation to participate in services. Nevertheless, all DR approaches see the families as experts in identifying, assessing, and solving their own problems, and establish partnerships between CWS and community-based organizations to serve at-risk families in the community. (239 pages + PowerPoint presentation) The module can be reached at: http://www.csulb.edu/projects/ccwrl/CalSWEC_curriculum_products.htm and then scrolling down. Perhaps this information will be useful to you and others interested in DR implementation. Cheryl Fujii, MPA Resource Specialist California Child Welfare Resource Library A Division of the California Social Work Education Center Located at California State University, Long Beach School of Social Work 1250 Bellflower Boulevard Long Beach, CA 90840-4602 562-985-4570 From: bounce-70613282-6833016@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-70613282-6833016@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kim Campbell Sent: Sunday, November 04, 2012 9:09 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@cornell.edu Subject: question about Differential Response in child welfare Does anyone know how many states are using Differential Response Services in their child welfare systems? Thanks. Kim Campbell, MSW Child Health & Development Institute 270 Farmington Ave. Farmington CT 06117

The California Child Welfare Resource Library, a Division of the California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC) has a DR module posted on its website: Berrick, J. D., Bryant, M., Conley, A., de Elizalde, L., Garcia, V., Geer, A., et al. (2009). Differential Response and Alternative Response in Diverse Communities: An Empirically Based Curriculum. Traditionally, the child welfare system (CWS) has targeted families at greatest risk for child abuse or neglect, while taking no further action on cases deemed to be at low to moderate risk. However, practitioners and researchers agree that families whose mistreatment does not meet criteria for abuse still need services. Differential Response (DR) is an effort to reform this system by offering voluntary services to these families who would not qualify for services under the traditional CWS. While the specific implementation of DR varies by locality, all DR models share five general components: screening based on risk, voluntary provision of services, respectful engagement of families, community involvement, and a focus on prevention. There is some controversy over classifying these services as voluntary. Sometimes CWS is notified if families refuse services or families may perceive this to be the case. Whether or not the services are truly voluntary may impact client motivation to participate in services. Nevertheless, all DR approaches see the families as experts in identifying, assessing, and solving their own problems, and establish partnerships between CWS and community-based organizations to serve at-risk families in the community. (239 pages + PowerPoint presentation) The module can be reached at: http://www.csulb.edu/projects/ccwrl/CalSWEC_curriculum_products.htm and then scrolling down. Perhaps this information will be useful to you and others interested in DR implementation. Cheryl Fujii, MPA Resource Specialist California Child Welfare Resource Library A Division of the California Social Work Education Center Located at California State University, Long Beach School of Social Work 1250 Bellflower Boulevard Long Beach, CA 90840-4602 562-985-4570 From: bounce-70613282-6833016list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-70613282-6833016list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kim Campbell Sent: Sunday, November 04, 2012 9:09 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-lcornell.edu Subject: question about Differential Response in child welfare Does anyone know how many states are using Differential Response Services in their child welfare systems? Thanks. Kim Campbell, MSW Child Health & Development Institute 270 Farmington Ave. Farmington CT 06117