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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9293
Date: 2012-11-27

Author:Merkel-Holguin, Lisa

Subject:RE: Family Group Decision Making

Per your inquiry, I would encourage you to visit the following link which is an annotated bibliography of the major studies to date on family group decision making and other family engagement approaches. http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Documents/Research%20Annotated%20Bibliography%202012%20Printable%20Version.pdf The National Center on Family Group Decision Making, started under the auspices of the American Humane Association, has recently moved to the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Colorado. Other FGDM resources are also available on this site. http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Pages/FGDM.aspx The literature increasingly confuses the term family group decision making; this began occurring around 2003, as a plethora of "family meeting" models emerged in practice in the United States and elsewhere. Given these murky waters, between 2006-2008, leaders in family group decision making from over 7 nations, came together to discuss family group decision making origins, principles, and values, and the core elements that are necessary for exemplary practice. The two page paper at http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Documents/FGDM%20Web%20Pages/About%20FGDM/Purpose%20Values%20and%20Processes.pdf outlines the five core elements as: 1. An independent (i.e., non-case carrying) coordinator is responsible for convening the family group meeting with agency personnel. When a critical decision about a child is required, dialogue occurs between the family group and the responsible child protection agency personnel. Providing an independent coordinator who is charged with creating an environment in which transparent, honest and respectful dialogue occurs between agency personnel and family groups signifies an agency's commitment to empowering and non-oppressive practice. 2. The child protection agency personnel recognize the family group as their key decision-making partner, and time and resources are available to convene this group. Providing the time and resources to seek out family group members and prepare them for their role in the decision-making process signifies an agency's acceptance of the importance of family groups in formulating safety and care plans. 3. Family groups have the opportunity to meet on their own, without the statutory authorities and other non-family members present, to work through the information they have been given and to formulate their responses and plans. Providing family groups with time to meet on their own enables them to apply their knowledge and expertise in a familiar setting and to do so in ways that are consistent with their ethnic and cultural decision-making practices. Acknowledging the importance of this time and taking active steps to encourage family groups to plan in this way signifies an agency's acceptance of its own limitations, as well as its commitment to ensuring that the best possible decisions and plans are made. 4. When agency concerns are adequately addressed, preference is given to a family group's plan over any other possible plan. In accepting the family group's lead, an agency signifies its confidence in, and its commitment to, partnering and supporting family groups in caring for and protecting their children, and to building the family groups' capacity to do so. 5. Referring agencies support family groups by providing the services and resources necessary to implement the agreed-upon plans. In assisting family groups in implementing their plans, agencies uphold the family groups' responsibility for the care and protection of their children, and contribute by aligning the agency and community resources to support the family groups' efforts. With that, I do not believe some of the models identified in the original post are models of family group decision making, as they do not meet these core elements. They likely represent models that engage families in decision making to varying degrees, and represent significant variations. Regards, Lisa Lisa Merkel-Holguin, MSW Assistant Professor | Department of Pediatrics Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse & Neglect University of Colorado School of Medicine The Gary Pavilion at Children's Hospital Colorado | Anschutz Medical Campus 13123 East 16th Avenue, B390 | Aurora, CO 80045 Phone: (303) 864-5211 | Fax: (303) 864-5367 lisa.merkel-holguin@childrenscolorado.org -----Original Message----- From: bounce-72449137-43189615@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72449137-43189615@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of lea.tufford@utoronto.ca Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2012 8:48 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-L@cornell.edu Subject: Family Group Decision Making Together with Professor Aron Shlonsky, University of Toronto, I am conducting a systematic review on the effects of Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) for children and young people at risk of child abuse and neglect. FGDM is also known as Family Group Conferencing, Family Unity Meeting Model, Team Decision Making, Family Team Conference, or Family Team Meetings). We would be grateful for any assistance in obtaining details of any study, in any language, published or unpublished, to do with this area. Thank you, Lea Tufford, PhD Research Associate Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto, Ontario Canada Phone: (416) 524-3010 Fax: (416) 978-7072 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail is confidential, may be legally privileged, and for the intended recipient only. Access, disclosure, copying, forwarding and distribution by any means is strictly prohibited. If received in error, do not read but delete and e-mail confirmation to the sender. ================================================================================

Per your inquiry, I would encourage you to visit the following link which is an annotated bibliography of the major studies to date on family group decision making and other family engagement approaches. http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Documents/Research%20Annotated%20Bibliography%202012%20Printable%20Version.pdf The National Center on Family Group Decision Making, started under the auspices of the American Humane Association, has recently moved to the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect at the University of Colorado. Other FGDM resources are also available on this site. http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Pages/FGDM.aspx The literature increasingly confuses the term family group decision making; this began occurring around 2003, as a plethora of "family meeting" models emerged in practice in the United States and elsewhere. Given these murky waters, between 2006-2008, leaders in family group decision making from over 7 nations, came together to discuss family group decision making origins, principles, and values, and the core elements that are necessary for exemplary practice. The two page paper at http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/subs/can/FGDM/Documents/FGDM%20Web%20Pages/About%20FGDM/Purpose%20Values%20and%20Processes.pdf outlines the five core elements as: 1. An independent (i.e., non-case carrying) coordinator is responsible for convening the family group meeting with agency personnel. When a critical decision about a child is required, dialogue occurs between the family group and the responsible child protection agency personnel. Providing an independent coordinator who is charged with creating an environment in which transparent, honest and respectful dialogue occurs between agency personnel and family groups signifies an agency's commitment to empowering and non-oppressive practice. 2. The child protection agency personnel recognize the family group as their key decision-making partner, and time and resources are available to convene this group. Providing the time and resources to seek out family group members and prepare them for their role in the decision-making process signifies an agency's acceptance of the importance of family groups in formulating safety and care plans. 3. Family groups have the opportunity to meet on their own, without the statutory authorities and other non-family members present, to work through the information they have been given and to formulate their responses and plans. Providing family groups with time to meet on their own enables them to apply their knowledge and expertise in a familiar setting and to do so in ways that are consistent with their ethnic and cultural decision-making practices. Acknowledging the importance of this time and taking active steps to encourage family groups to plan in this way signifies an agency's acceptance of its own limitations, as well as its commitment to ensuring that the best possible decisions and plans are made. 4. When agency concerns are adequately addressed, preference is given to a family group's plan over any other possible plan. In accepting the family group's lead, an agency signifies its confidence in, and its commitment to, partnering and supporting family groups in caring for and protecting their children, and to building the family groups' capacity to do so. 5. Referring agencies support family groups by providing the services and resources necessary to implement the agreed-upon plans. In assisting family groups in implementing their plans, agencies uphold the family groups' responsibility for the care and protection of their children, and contribute by aligning the agency and community resources to support the family groups' efforts. With that, I do not believe some of the models identified in the original post are models of family group decision making, as they do not meet these core elements. They likely represent models that engage families in decision making to varying degrees, and represent significant variations. Regards, Lisa Lisa Merkel-Holguin, MSW Assistant Professor | Department of Pediatrics Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse & Neglect University of Colorado School of Medicine The Gary Pavilion at Children's Hospital Colorado | Anschutz Medical Campus 13123 East 16th Avenue, B390 | Aurora, CO 80045 Phone: (303) 864-5211 | Fax: (303) 864-5367 lisa.merkel-holguinchildrenscolorado.org -----Original Message----- From: bounce-72449137-43189615list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-72449137-43189615list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of lea.tuffordutoronto.ca Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2012 8:48 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-Lcornell.edu Subject: Family Group Decision Making Together with Professor Aron Shlonsky, University of Toronto, I am conducting a systematic review on the effects of Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) for children and young people at risk of child abuse and neglect. FGDM is also known as Family Group Conferencing, Family Unity Meeting Model, Team Decision Making, Family Team Conference, or Family Team Meetings). We would be grateful for any assistance in obtaining details of any study, in any language, published or unpublished, to do with this area. Thank you, Lea Tufford, PhD Research Associate Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto, Ontario Canada Phone: (416) 524-3010 Fax: (416) 978-7072 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail is confidential, may be legally privileged, and for the intended recipient only. Access, disclosure, copying, forwarding and distribution by any means is strictly prohibited. If received in error, do not read but delete and e-mail confirmation to the sender. ================================================================================