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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 9213
Date: 2012-06-25

Author:Mapp, Susan C

Subject:RE: questions regardign parent-child visitation

It’s been quite a while, but I published an article about 10 years ago looking at this issue of parent-child visitation based upon the literature available at that time: Mapp, S. (2002). A framework for family visiting for children in long-term foster care. Families in Society, 83(2), 175-182. Susan Mapp, Ph.D., MSSW Associate Professor and Chair, Dept. Of Social Work Elizabethtown College mapps@etown.edu From: bounce-61624098-6833797@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-61624098-6833797@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Leslie Ellen Shear Sent: Friday, June 22, 2012 3:25 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: questions regardign parent-child visitation I would be very wary of imputing causation without alternate hypotheses. We see similar behaviors in cases where there is no history of abuse in family law, where the problems really may be not enough time with one parent, unbearable and age-inappropriate long separations, and tensions between caregivers. Leslie Ellen Shear, CFLS, CALS* and IAML** Attorney at Law California State Bar No. 72623 16133 Ventura Boulevard, Seventh Floor Encino, CA 91436-2403 Phone: 818 501-3691 Fax: 818 501-3692 Email: custodymatters@earthlink.net lescfls@earthlink.net lescfls@me.com Web: www.custodymatters.com www.californiafamilylawappeals.com *Certified as a Specialist in Family Law (1983) and a Specialist in Appellate Law (2009) by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. ** Fellow, International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers Sent from my iPad On Jun 22, 2012, at 10:05 AM, Christine Wekerle > wrote: I think it is a case-by-case assessment and the emotionality post-visits, such as regression to immature behaviours (bed-wetting, problems going to sleep etc.) are very real indicators that the parents trigger fear-based responding in the child, so it may be helpful to consider PTSD-like symptomatology as a conceptual frame. While some children will directly express a wish to not have visits, other times we are in the role of protecting their psychological safety, and promoting their well-being. On Fri, Jun 22, 2012 at 7:56 AM, Auguste Elliott > wrote: Yes, that is why I so appreciate Dr. Beyer's recognition that there is a "trauma of separation" and that both child and parent have been changed by the experience. Regardless of how their time was before, they are now in a different place. That has really been helpful to us in helping child welfare workers to understand that distress can come from the situation for all parties and be addressed as such. Auguste Elliott On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 9:26 AM, D F MCMAHON > wrote: I found some material on Dr. Beyer's work I truly appreciated. But it is also important to overcome the ingrained presumption that problematic emotions/behaviors surrounding visits must mean contact with parents is "bad" and visits should be curtailed. This presumption is also often echoed in legal proceedings in child welfare. Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ Date: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 10:22:12 -0400 Subject: Re: questions regardign parent-child visitation From: selliott@email.fielding.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Hello Jessica, I am involved as consulting psychologist to a program called "Family Time Coaching" in Vermont. We have been developing the practice over the past three years. It is based on Dr. Marty Beyer's "Visit Coaching" model which focuses on parent child visitation as the great missed opportunity in child welfare, i.e. the fertile ground for intervention. Family Time Coaching is based on child needs and begins as soon as possible after placement. Elements include a parent interview in which the parent is supported to identify child needs, pre and post meetings before and after each visit (Family Time) to support the parent to put aside adult concerns and prepare for the child (pre) and process feedback and prepare to return to their life outside the visit (post), coaching for the parent during the visit, and shared parenting meetings which begin at placement and occur monthly between parents, foster parents, coach, and social worker and, again, focus on child needs as they are evolving and understood by all parties. Family Time Coaching has been designated best practice by the state. Easter Seals Vermont, which has been the spearheading contractor providing the service in half the child welfare districts, has begun a program evaluation. Thus far we have completed the first round of qualitatively analyzed parent interviews and I would be happy to provide you with those results. You can access Dr. Beyer's model via her website MartyBeyer.com . I was recently part of a panel discussing the research efforts around the practice at the Children's Bureau conference and would be happy to share that information with you as well. All the best, S. Auguste Elliott, PhD, LP-D, RPT-S On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 3:45 PM, Jessica A Rodriguez-Jenkins > wrote: Good afternoon, I am currently looking at the use of parent-child visitation and potentials for use of visitation times for parent-child interventions. I have heard that in Utah there is either a pilot project or a policy in place for setting up parent-child visits within 24 hours of removal. I am trying to find out more about this and am interested in whether there has been any evaluation on this practice. I have also heard that there is a practice in California where children and parents would get a phone call within 24 hours and am wondering whether there is any information about the impact of the calls on parents and children. If anyone has any further information about either of these protocols and whether they have been associated with any outcomes it would be very helpful. I am also wondering if anyone has had experience in developing an assessment tool for determining the level of supervision required during visits? A tool to know when it is time to liberalize the visits? Thank you, Jessica ______________________________ Jessica Rodriguez-JenKins, MSW Research Assistant | Predoctoral Instructor Partners for Our Children | University of Washington School of Social Work Box 359476 | Seattle, WA 98195-9476 F: 206-221-3155 -- Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics HSC 3A, CAAP 3N10 McMaster University 1280 Main Street. W., Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5 email: wekerc@mcmaster.ca or chris.wekerle@gmail.com webpage: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/pediatrics/wekerle_christine.html Associate Professor, Psychiatry, University of Toronto Courtesy Appointment, Child, Youth and Family Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health “Wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving.” ~ Kahlil Gibran

It’s been quite a while, but I published an article about 10 years ago looking at this issue of parent-child visitation based upon the literature available at that time: Mapp, S. (2002). A framework for family visiting for children in long-term foster care. Families in Society, 83(2), 175-182. Susan Mapp, Ph.D., MSSW Associate Professor and Chair, Dept. Of Social Work Elizabethtown College mappsetown.edu From: bounce-61624098-6833797list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-61624098-6833797list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Leslie Ellen Shear Sent: Friday, June 22, 2012 3:25 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: questions regardign parent-child visitation I would be very wary of imputing causation without alternate hypotheses. We see similar behaviors in cases where there is no history of abuse in family law, where the problems really may be not enough time with one parent, unbearable and age-inappropriate long separations, and tensions between caregivers. Leslie Ellen Shear, CFLS, CALS* and IAML** Attorney at Law California State Bar No. 72623 16133 Ventura Boulevard, Seventh Floor Encino, CA 91436-2403 Phone: 818 501-3691 Fax: 818 501-3692 Email: custodymattersearthlink.net lescflsearthlink.net lescflsme.com Web: www.custodymatters.com www.californiafamilylawappeals.com *Certified as a Specialist in Family Law (1983) and a Specialist in Appellate Law (2009) by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. ** Fellow, International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers Sent from my iPad On Jun 22, 2012, at 10:05 AM, Christine Wekerle > wrote: I think it is a case-by-case assessment and the emotionality post-visits, such as regression to immature behaviours (bed-wetting, problems going to sleep etc.) are very real indicators that the parents trigger fear-based responding in the child, so it may be helpful to consider PTSD-like symptomatology as a conceptual frame. While some children will directly express a wish to not have visits, other times we are in the role of protecting their psychological safety, and promoting their well-being. On Fri, Jun 22, 2012 at 7:56 AM, Auguste Elliott > wrote: Yes, that is why I so appreciate Dr. Beyer's recognition that there is a "trauma of separation" and that both child and parent have been changed by the experience. Regardless of how their time was before, they are now in a different place. That has really been helpful to us in helping child welfare workers to understand that distress can come from the situation for all parties and be addressed as such. Auguste Elliott On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 9:26 AM, D F MCMAHON > wrote: I found some material on Dr. Beyer's work I truly appreciated. But it is also important to overcome the ingrained presumption that problematic emotions/behaviors surrounding visits must mean contact with parents is "bad" and visits should be curtailed. This presumption is also often echoed in legal proceedings in child welfare. Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ Date: Mon, 4 Jun 2012 10:22:12 -0400 Subject: Re: questions regardign parent-child visitation From: selliottemail.fielding.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Hello Jessica, I am involved as consulting psychologist to a program called "Family Time Coaching" in Vermont. We have been developing the practice over the past three years. It is based on Dr. Marty Beyer's "Visit Coaching" model which focuses on parent child visitation as the great missed opportunity in child welfare, i.e. the fertile ground for intervention. Family Time Coaching is based on child needs and begins as soon as possible after placement. Elements include a parent interview in which the parent is supported to identify child needs, pre and post meetings before and after each visit (Family Time) to support the parent to put aside adult concerns and prepare for the child (pre) and process feedback and prepare to return to their life outside the visit (post), coaching for the parent during the visit, and shared parenting meetings which begin at placement and occur monthly between parents, foster parents, coach, and social worker and, again, focus on child needs as they are evolving and understood by all parties. Family Time Coaching has been designated best practice by the state. Easter Seals Vermont, which has been the spearheading contractor providing the service in half the child welfare districts, has begun a program evaluation. Thus far we have completed the first round of qualitatively analyzed parent interviews and I would be happy to provide you with those results. You can access Dr. Beyer's model via her website MartyBeyer.com . I was recently part of a panel discussing the research efforts around the practice at the Children's Bureau conference and would be happy to share that information with you as well. All the best, S. Auguste Elliott, PhD, LP-D, RPT-S On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 3:45 PM, Jessica A Rodriguez-Jenkins > wrote: Good afternoon, I am currently looking at the use of parent-child visitation and potentials for use of visitation times for parent-child interventions. I have heard that in Utah there is either a pilot project or a policy in place for setting up parent-child visits within 24 hours of removal. I am trying to find out more about this and am interested in whether there has been any evaluation on this practice. I have also heard that there is a practice in California where children and parents would get a phone call within 24 hours and am wondering whether there is any information about the impact of the calls on parents and children. If anyone has any further information about either of these protocols and whether they have been associated with any outcomes it would be very helpful. I am also wondering if anyone has had experience in developing an assessment tool for determining the level of supervision required during visits? A tool to know when it is time to liberalize the visits? Thank you, Jessica ______________________________ Jessica Rodriguez-JenKins, MSW Research Assistant | Predoctoral Instructor Partners for Our Children | University of Washington School of Social Work Box 359476 | Seattle, WA 98195-9476 F: 206-221-3155 -- Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics HSC 3A, CAAP 3N10 McMaster University 1280 Main Street. W., Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5 email: wekercmcmaster.ca or chris.wekerlegmail.com webpage: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/pediatrics/wekerle_christine.html Associate Professor, Psychiatry, University of Toronto Courtesy Appointment, Child, Youth and Family Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health “Wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving.” ~ Kahlil Gibran