Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 9132
Date: 2012-03-11

Author:Aaron Robb, M.Ed., NCC, LPC-S

Subject:Re: CPS Investigator Caseloads

Only anecdotal, but I think that "66.7 cases (responses) a year" statistic needs to be seriously datamined for outliers and bad input. 66.7 cases a year comes out to around 5.5 cases a month, or about 1.3 new cases a week. It's easily four times that in most investigative units I worked in. Heck, isn't the CWLA recommended caseload 12 investigations per month[1]? Assuming no month-to-month cary over that's 144 responses a year, and the CWLA recommended load was always a pipe dream (at least in Texas). The more I think of this figure the more I hear the car talk guys in by head - "Boooooogus..." [1] http://www.cwla.org/programs/standards/caseloadstandards.htm -- Aaron Robb, M.Ed., NCC, LPC-S Forensic Counseling Services http://www.texascounseling.org Mailing Address: 2831 Eldorado Pkwy., Ste. 103-377, Frisco, TX 75033 Phone: 972-360-7437; Fax: 940-343-2601 Man goes to doctor. Says he's depressed. Says life seems harsh and cruel. Says he feels all alone in a threatening world where what lies ahead is vague and uncertain. Doctor says "Treatment is simple. Great clown Pagliacci is in town tonight. Go and see him. That should pick you up." Man bursts into tears. Says "But, doctor...I am Pagliacci." – Walter Kovacs This e-mail and any attachments contain information from the office of Aaron Robb, LPC-S and are intended solely for the use of the named recipients. Any dissemination of this e-mail is strictly prohibited. If you believe you have received this e-mail in error, notify the sender immediately and permanently delete the e-mail, any attachments, and all copies thereof from any drives or storage media and destroy any printouts of the e-mails or attachments. From: Edward Opton To: "child-maltreatment-research-L@cornell.edu" Sent: Friday, March 9, 2012 5:15 PM Subject: CPS Investigator Caseloads The Children’s Bureau report “Child Maltreatment 2010” includes interesting data on CPS investigator caseloads. According to the report: “Using data from 41 States, in FFY 2010, investigation workers conducted an average of 66.7 responses a year . . . .” (P. 9.) If one assumes a work-year of 49 work weeks at 40 hours per week, a caseload of 66.7 cases per year would allow an average of 29.4 hours per case. Is that consonant with the many, many complaints that investigative caseworkers are crushed beneath inhuman, impossible workloads? To an outsider, it might seem that 29+ hours would be enough for an average case—some cases would require more time, some less. But is an average of 29+ hours not enough for the average case? If not, why not? Or is there reason to question the accuracy of the 66.7 case per year statistic? A related question: what is a “caseload?” Some caseworker supervisors don’t seem to know whether “caseload” means: (a) the number of cases a caseworker has “open” at a particular point in time, such as the last day of a month; (b) the number of cases a caseworker has “open” on at least one day during a period of time, such as a month, i.e., the number of “old” cases still open at the beginning of a month plus the number of new cases assigned during that month; (c) the number of new cases a caseworker is assigned during a period of time, such as a month; (d) some other definition. Is there a standard definition of the term? Edward Opton, Ph.D. National Center for Youth Law 405 14th St. Oakland, CA 94612 Eopton[at]youthlaw.org

Only anecdotal, but I think that "66.7 cases (responses) a year" statistic needs to be seriously datamined for outliers and bad input. 66.7 cases a year comes out to around 5.5 cases a month, or about 1.3 new cases a week. It's easily four times that in most investigative units I worked in. Heck, isn't the CWLA recommended caseload 12 investigations per month[1]? Assuming no month-to-month cary over that's 144 responses a year, and the CWLA recommended load was always a pipe dream (at least in Texas). The more I think of this figure the more I hear the car talk guys in by head - "Boooooogus..." [1] http://www.cwla.org/programs/standards/caseloadstandards.htm -- Aaron Robb, M.Ed., NCC, LPC-S Forensic Counseling Services http://www.texascounseling.org Mailing Address: 2831 Eldorado Pkwy., Ste. 103-377, Frisco, TX 75033 Phone: 972-360-7437; Fax: 940-343-2601 Man goes to doctor. Says he's depressed. Says life seems harsh and cruel. Says he feels all alone in a threatening world where what lies ahead is vague and uncertain. Doctor says "Treatment is simple. Great clown Pagliacci is in town tonight. Go and see him. That should pick you up." Man bursts into tears. Says "But, doctor...I am Pagliacci." – Walter Kovacs This e-mail and any attachments contain information from the office of Aaron Robb, LPC-S and are intended solely for the use of the named recipients. Any dissemination of this e-mail is strictly prohibited. If you believe you have received this e-mail in error, notify the sender immediately and permanently delete the e-mail, any attachments, and all copies thereof from any drives or storage media and destroy any printouts of the e-mails or attachments. From: Edward Opton To: "child-maltreatment-research-Lcornell.edu" Sent: Friday, March 9, 2012 5:15 PM Subject: CPS Investigator Caseloads The Children’s Bureau report “Child Maltreatment 2010” includes interesting data on CPS investigator caseloads. According to the report: “Using data from 41 States, in FFY 2010, investigation workers conducted an average of 66.7 responses a year . . . .” (P. 9.) If one assumes a work-year of 49 work weeks at 40 hours per week, a caseload of 66.7 cases per year would allow an average of 29.4 hours per case. Is that consonant with the many, many complaints that investigative caseworkers are crushed beneath inhuman, impossible workloads? To an outsider, it might seem that 29+ hours would be enough for an average case—some cases would require more time, some less. But is an average of 29+ hours not enough for the average case? If not, why not? Or is there reason to question the accuracy of the 66.7 case per year statistic? A related question: what is a “caseload?” Some caseworker supervisors don’t seem to know whether “caseload” means: (a) the number of cases a caseworker has “open” at a particular point in time, such as the last day of a month; (b) the number of cases a caseworker has “open” on at least one day during a period of time, such as a month, i.e., the number of “old” cases still open at the beginning of a month plus the number of new cases assigned during that month; (c) the number of new cases a caseworker is assigned during a period of time, such as a month; (d) some other definition. Is there a standard definition of the term? Edward Opton, Ph.D. National Center for Youth Law 405 14th St. Oakland, CA 94612 Eopton[at]youthlaw.org