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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8994
Date: 2011-11-03

Author:Radel, Laura (HHS/ASPE)

Subject:RE: child-maltreatment-research-l digest: November 02, 2011

Regarding Ancil Payne's recent inquiry on a national database of child maltreatment perpetrators: The Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-248) requires the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish a national registry of child maltreatment perpetrators and to conduct a study of the feasibility of establishing such a registry. While no funds have been appropriated for the development of a national registry, the required feasibility study is underway. HHS published an interim report to the Congress in May 2009 regarding feasibility (available online at http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/ChildAbuseRegistryInterimReport/index.shtml) and has since conducted research to follow up on the interim report and to fill a number of gaps in knowledge identified in the interim report. The interim report included four conclusions: 1. Potential benefits of a national child abuse registry are largely unknown. 2. A lack of incentives for participation could result in a database that includes little information and fails to fulfill its intent. 3. Before implementation could begin, legislative change would be needed to permit the collection of sufficient information to accurately identify perpetrators. 4. Clarification is required on several key issues that are ambiguous in the authorizing statute; these must be resolved either within HHS or by Congress before implementation could proceed. Following up on the interim report, HHS contracted with Walter R. McDonald and Associates (a consulting firm with expertise in child abuse and neglect data systems) for a more thorough feasibility study that included several components. Through a prevalence study we sought information to better quantify the potential benefits of a national registry of child abuse perpetrators, in particular by estimating the number of perpetrators nationally who have substantiated maltreatment histories in multiple states. In addition, we surveyed key informants in the states to gain a better understanding of the content of state child abuse registries, current practices with respect to interstate inquiries regarding alleged child maltreatment perpetrators, and to solicit states' input as to their interest in participating in a voluntary registry and the benefits and barriers they see regarding their participation. The full study also includes a legal review of the many recent court challenges to various aspects of state child abuse registries. That review will inform recommendations to the Congress on due process protections with respect to a national registry, should one be established. We are currently wrapping up the research and are in the process of preparing a final report to the Congress which we expect to publish in 2012. I hope this information is helpful. Laura Radel Senior Social Science Analyst Division of Children and Youth Policy Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 202-690-5938 Laura.Radel@hhs.gov

Regarding Ancil Payne's recent inquiry on a national database of child maltreatment perpetrators: The Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-248) requires the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish a national registry of child maltreatment perpetrators and to conduct a study of the feasibility of establishing such a registry. While no funds have been appropriated for the development of a national registry, the required feasibility study is underway. HHS published an interim report to the Congress in May 2009 regarding feasibility (available online at http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/09/ChildAbuseRegistryInterimReport/index.shtml) and has since conducted research to follow up on the interim report and to fill a number of gaps in knowledge identified in the interim report. The interim report included four conclusions: 1. Potential benefits of a national child abuse registry are largely unknown. 2. A lack of incentives for participation could result in a database that includes little information and fails to fulfill its intent. 3. Before implementation could begin, legislative change would be needed to permit the collection of sufficient information to accurately identify perpetrators. 4. Clarification is required on several key issues that are ambiguous in the authorizing statute; these must be resolved either within HHS or by Congress before implementation could proceed. Following up on the interim report, HHS contracted with Walter R. McDonald and Associates (a consulting firm with expertise in child abuse and neglect data systems) for a more thorough feasibility study that included several components. Through a prevalence study we sought information to better quantify the potential benefits of a national registry of child abuse perpetrators, in particular by estimating the number of perpetrators nationally who have substantiated maltreatment histories in multiple states. In addition, we surveyed key informants in the states to gain a better understanding of the content of state child abuse registries, current practices with respect to interstate inquiries regarding alleged child maltreatment perpetrators, and to solicit states' input as to their interest in participating in a voluntary registry and the benefits and barriers they see regarding their participation. The full study also includes a legal review of the many recent court challenges to various aspects of state child abuse registries. That review will inform recommendations to the Congress on due process protections with respect to a national registry, should one be established. We are currently wrapping up the research and are in the process of preparing a final report to the Congress which we expect to publish in 2012. I hope this information is helpful. Laura Radel Senior Social Science Analyst Division of Children and Youth Policy Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 202-690-5938 Laura.Radelhhs.gov