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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8977
Date: 2011-10-28

Author:PMunkeaol.com

Subject:Re: NPR stories

There are some issues in this series that seem to reflect an incorrect depiction of social workers, that is the term is applied to child protection workers in general rather than to people who hold the BSW or MSW degree. Is there a way to get NPR to revisit this issue and make the appropriate corrections? I think this is an important issue because many of the issues represented in the series reflect the use of people as child protection workers who do not have the appropriate education and training to make these important decisions. This should be one of the lessons learned from the debacle that child protection represents in South Dakota in regard to the Native American population. If the standards for hiring were strengthened to mandate the use of properly educated and credentialed social workers, much heart break to families and children would be avoided as well as violations of the Indian Child Welfare Act, and as well as national embarrassment to the state of South Dakota. peg munke, Ph.D, MSW president elect, Baccalaureate Program Directors Association [BPD] In a message dated 10/28/2011 7:48:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time, NCCPR@aol.com writes: NPR has just concluded an impressive three-part series on the impact of the child welfare system in South Dakota on Native Americans in that state. It's available on the NPR website here: http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141672992/native-foster-care-lost-children-shattered-families Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org

There are some issues in this series that seem to reflect an incorrect depiction of social workers, that is the term is applied to child protection workers in general rather than to people who hold the BSW or MSW degree. Is there a way to get NPR to revisit this issue and make the appropriate corrections? I think this is an important issue because many of the issues represented in the series reflect the use of people as child protection workers who do not have the appropriate education and training to make these important decisions. This should be one of the lessons learned from the debacle that child protection represents in South Dakota in regard to the Native American population. If the standards for hiring were strengthened to mandate the use of properly educated and credentialed social workers, much heart break to families and children would be avoided as well as violations of the Indian Child Welfare Act, and as well as national embarrassment to the state of South Dakota. peg munke, Ph.D, MSW president elect, Baccalaureate Program Directors Association [BPD] In a message dated 10/28/2011 7:48:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time, NCCPRaol.com writes: NPR has just concluded an impressive three-part series on the impact of the child welfare system in South Dakota on Native Americans in that state. It's available on the NPR website here: http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141672992/native-foster-care-lost-children-shattered-families Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org