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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8969
Date: 2011-10-30

Author:Angelique Day

Subject:Re: NPR stories

I think it is not just teaching about ICWA to future front line workers, but also the issue of the level of knowledge of the act by supervisors. I have previously worked in CPS, and feel very knowledgeable about the act, but received alot of pushback from my supervisor in trying to adhere to the policy. I was accused of "favoring my Indian families". The lack of support from my supervisor eventually drove me to look for another position. ----- Original Message ----- From: Anne Day To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Sent: Friday, October 28, 2011 1:11 PM Subject: Re: NPR stories I worry that this issue goes beyond job titles and possibly educational attainment. I would be willing to bet a vast majority of CPS worker across the country don't know what ICWA is and certainly don't know the details of what ICWA says. Unfortunately, I would also be willing to bet many MSW graduates don't know what ICWA is or what ICWA says. It may not simply be a matter of addressing the hiring standards in CPS (which I agree need to be re-examined) but also taking a critical look at what we're teaching MSW students and how we can curtail the MSW education to properly prepare students for their field. Furthermore, estabilshing a strong relationship between social work schools and social services agencies can allow social work schools to provide ongoing training to fill in the gaps where education didn't properly prepare workers in the field. On Fri, Oct 28, 2011 at 9:09 AM, > wrote: There are some issues in this series that seem to reflect an incorrect depiction of social workers, that is the term is applied to child protection workers in general rather than to people who hold the BSW or MSW degree. Is there a way to get NPR to revisit this issue and make the appropriate corrections? I think this is an important issue because many of the issues represented in the series reflect the use of people as child protection workers who do not have the appropriate education and training to make these important decisions. This should be one of the lessons learned from the debacle that child protection represents in South Dakota in regard to the Native American population. If the standards for hiring were strengthened to mandate the use of properly educated and credentialed social workers, much heart break to families and children would be avoided as well as violations of the Indian Child Welfare Act, and as well as national embarrassment to the state of South Dakota. peg munke, Ph.D, MSW president elect, Baccalaureate Program Directors Association [BPD] In a message dated 10/28/2011 7:48:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time, NCCPR@aol.com writes: NPR has just concluded an impressive three-part series on the impact of the child welfare system in South Dakota on Native Americans in that state. It's available on the NPR website here: http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141672992/native-foster-care-lost-children-shattered-families Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org -- Anne Day anneday@sp2.upenn.edu anne.day@temple.edu Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

I think it is not just teaching about ICWA to future front line workers, but also the issue of the level of knowledge of the act by supervisors. I have previously worked in CPS, and feel very knowledgeable about the act, but received alot of pushback from my supervisor in trying to adhere to the policy. I was accused of "favoring my Indian families". The lack of support from my supervisor eventually drove me to look for another position. ----- Original Message ----- From: Anne Day To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Sent: Friday, October 28, 2011 1:11 PM Subject: Re: NPR stories I worry that this issue goes beyond job titles and possibly educational attainment. I would be willing to bet a vast majority of CPS worker across the country don't know what ICWA is and certainly don't know the details of what ICWA says. Unfortunately, I would also be willing to bet many MSW graduates don't know what ICWA is or what ICWA says. It may not simply be a matter of addressing the hiring standards in CPS (which I agree need to be re-examined) but also taking a critical look at what we're teaching MSW students and how we can curtail the MSW education to properly prepare students for their field. Furthermore, estabilshing a strong relationship between social work schools and social services agencies can allow social work schools to provide ongoing training to fill in the gaps where education didn't properly prepare workers in the field. On Fri, Oct 28, 2011 at 9:09 AM, > wrote: There are some issues in this series that seem to reflect an incorrect depiction of social workers, that is the term is applied to child protection workers in general rather than to people who hold the BSW or MSW degree. Is there a way to get NPR to revisit this issue and make the appropriate corrections? I think this is an important issue because many of the issues represented in the series reflect the use of people as child protection workers who do not have the appropriate education and training to make these important decisions. This should be one of the lessons learned from the debacle that child protection represents in South Dakota in regard to the Native American population. If the standards for hiring were strengthened to mandate the use of properly educated and credentialed social workers, much heart break to families and children would be avoided as well as violations of the Indian Child Welfare Act, and as well as national embarrassment to the state of South Dakota. peg munke, Ph.D, MSW president elect, Baccalaureate Program Directors Association [BPD] In a message dated 10/28/2011 7:48:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time, NCCPRaol.com writes: NPR has just concluded an impressive three-part series on the impact of the child welfare system in South Dakota on Native Americans in that state. It's available on the NPR website here: http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141672992/native-foster-care-lost-children-shattered-families Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org -- Anne Day annedaysp2.upenn.edu anne.daytemple.edu Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.