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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8914
Date: 2011-08-15

Author:Dick Schoech

Subject:Re: Seeking literature pertaining to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/ supervisors

We developed a computer simulation several years ago. No actors. I can provide details if that fits your needs. D Schoech, UT Arlington School of Social Work On 8/15/2011 11:32 AM, Sarah L. Beatty wrote: Dear Fellow Colleagues, We are writing to seek your assistance again in our search of the literature pertaining to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/ supervisors. These simulations should involve at least one trained actor (sometimes called a standardized patient) who interacts with the trainee in a simulated casework interaction (we are not including role plays without trained actors, such as two social workers or other helping professionals who are 'role playing' scenarios). The project is being conducted by Professors Marion Bogo and Aron Shlonsky at the University of Toronto. Since emailing everyone in March 2011, we have scoped the literature and located seven articles: Forrester, D., Kershaw, S., Moss, H., & Hughes, L. (2008). Communication skills in child protection: how do social workers talk to parents? Child and Family Social Work, 13, 41-51. Freeman, K.A. (1998). Investigative interviewing with children: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a training program for child protective service workers (Unpublished doctoral thesis). West Virginia University: Morgantown, West Virginia. Freeman, K.A., & Morris, T.L. (1999). Investigative interviewing with children: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a training program for child protective service workers. Child Abuse & Neglect, 23(7), 701-713. Friend, C. (2004). Helping public child welfare workers learn interviewing skills (Unpublished doctoral thesis). Case Western Reserve University: Cleveland, Ohio. Friend, C. (2004). Helping public child welfare workers learn interviewing skills: A research report. Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute. Powell, M.B., Fisher, R.P., & Hughes-Scholes, C.H. (2008). The effect of using trained versus untrained adult respondents in simulated practice interviews about child abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32, 1007-1016. Powell, M.B., Fisher, R.P., & Hughes-Scholes, C.H. (2008). The effect of intra- versus post-interview feedback during simulated practice interviews about child abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32, 213-227. We are curious to know if you are aware of any other empirical studies (including those presented only at conferences), curriculum syllabi within child welfare agencies or schools of social work, agency reports, or any other resource that may be relevant to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/ supervisors. Thanks kindly in advance for your support with this request. Barbara Lee & Sarah Beatty barbara.lee@utoronto & sarah.beatty@utoronto.ca Research Assistants University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto ON M5S 1V4

We developed a computer simulation several years ago. No actors. I can provide details if that fits your needs. D Schoech, UT Arlington School of Social Work On 8/15/2011 11:32 AM, Sarah L. Beatty wrote: Dear Fellow Colleagues, We are writing to seek your assistance again in our search of the literature pertaining to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/ supervisors. These simulations should involve at least one trained actor (sometimes called a standardized patient) who interacts with the trainee in a simulated casework interaction (we are not including role plays without trained actors, such as two social workers or other helping professionals who are 'role playing' scenarios). The project is being conducted by Professors Marion Bogo and Aron Shlonsky at the University of Toronto. Since emailing everyone in March 2011, we have scoped the literature and located seven articles: Forrester, D., Kershaw, S., Moss, H., & Hughes, L. (2008). Communication skills in child protection: how do social workers talk to parents? Child and Family Social Work, 13, 41-51. Freeman, K.A. (1998). Investigative interviewing with children: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a training program for child protective service workers (Unpublished doctoral thesis). West Virginia University: Morgantown, West Virginia. Freeman, K.A., & Morris, T.L. (1999). Investigative interviewing with children: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a training program for child protective service workers. Child Abuse & Neglect, 23(7), 701-713. Friend, C. (2004). Helping public child welfare workers learn interviewing skills (Unpublished doctoral thesis). Case Western Reserve University: Cleveland, Ohio. Friend, C. (2004). Helping public child welfare workers learn interviewing skills: A research report. Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute. Powell, M.B., Fisher, R.P., & Hughes-Scholes, C.H. (2008). The effect of using trained versus untrained adult respondents in simulated practice interviews about child abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32, 1007-1016. Powell, M.B., Fisher, R.P., & Hughes-Scholes, C.H. (2008). The effect of intra- versus post-interview feedback during simulated practice interviews about child abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32, 213-227. We are curious to know if you are aware of any other empirical studies (including those presented only at conferences), curriculum syllabi within child welfare agencies or schools of social work, agency reports, or any other resource that may be relevant to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/ supervisors. Thanks kindly in advance for your support with this request. Barbara Lee & Sarah Beatty barbara.leeutoronto & sarah.beattyutoronto.ca Research Assistants University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto ON M5S 1V4