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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8905
Date: 2011-07-15

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: African American boys in foster care-adoption rates; behavior problems

One quick comment: in special education (which is in many ways linked to foster care), minority children are more likely to be classified with "emotional disturbance" or "mental retardation" when exhibiting the same symptoms as white children who are classified as "Other health impaired", "autistic", and so on. That disproportion has at times been recognized by state special ed systems. One factor may be the amount of access parents have to specialists and their ability to use outside evaluations (or secure independent evaluations paid for by school districts in some cases) which present the information needed to obtain classifications outside the "catch all" categories of ED and MR. This would relate to how kids are labeled in other systems. Plus--personal experience--there don't seem to be specific, robust requirements regarding classification within the child welfare system. For example, my state has its own reporting system (CCWIPS) which records "clinically diagnosed conditions" along with "other conditions". Caseworkers frequently make the call as to what is entered, do not always use clinically recognized terminology, etc, and there is no particular method to ensure claims are linked to specific evaluation data. Plus, the long a kid is in the system, the more detritus gets stuck to this file or that, and it is unlikely (probably impossible in practical terms) that a rigorous analysis of records is ever done to minimize ambiguity. Sheri McMahon ND > Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2011 12:14:42 -0400 > From: LJJ10@pitt.edu > Subject: African American boys in foster care-adoption rates; behavior problems > To: child-maltreatment-research-l@cornell.edu > > Greetings, I am wondering if anyone knows of studies/data showing that > African American boys (not just African American children) are adopted > less often from foster care? Also, looking for data on African American > boys having more behavioral and emotional problems. > > I would appreciate any suggested citations > > Thank you, > > Lovie JJ > Stop the Violence/Start the Healing > ------------------------------------------- > Lovie J. Jackson, PhD, MSW > Assistant Professor > School of Social Work > University of Pittsburgh > 4200 Fifth Avenue > Pittsburgh, PA 15260 > ljj10@pitt.edu > (c) 206-290-4892 > >

One quick comment: in special education (which is in many ways linked to foster care), minority children are more likely to be classified with "emotional disturbance" or "mental retardation" when exhibiting the same symptoms as white children who are classified as "Other health impaired", "autistic", and so on. That disproportion has at times been recognized by state special ed systems. One factor may be the amount of access parents have to specialists and their ability to use outside evaluations (or secure independent evaluations paid for by school districts in some cases) which present the information needed to obtain classifications outside the "catch all" categories of ED and MR. This would relate to how kids are labeled in other systems. Plus--personal experience--there don't seem to be specific, robust requirements regarding classification within the child welfare system. For example, my state has its own reporting system (CCWIPS) which records "clinically diagnosed conditions" along with "other conditions". Caseworkers frequently make the call as to what is entered, do not always use clinically recognized terminology, etc, and there is no particular method to ensure claims are linked to specific evaluation data. Plus, the long a kid is in the system, the more detritus gets stuck to this file or that, and it is unlikely (probably impossible in practical terms) that a rigorous analysis of records is ever done to minimize ambiguity. Sheri McMahon ND > Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2011 12:14:42 -0400 > From: LJJ10pitt.edu > Subject: African American boys in foster care-adoption rates; behavior problems > To: child-maltreatment-research-lcornell.edu > > Greetings, I am wondering if anyone knows of studies/data showing that > African American boys (not just African American children) are adopted > less often from foster care? Also, looking for data on African American > boys having more behavioral and emotional problems. > > I would appreciate any suggested citations > > Thank you, > > Lovie JJ > Stop the Violence/Start the Healing > ------------------------------------------- > Lovie J. Jackson, PhD, MSW > Assistant Professor > School of Social Work > University of Pittsburgh > 4200 Fifth Avenue > Pittsburgh, PA 15260 > ljj10pitt.edu > (c) 206-290-4892 > >