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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8885
Date: 2011-06-22

Author:Carolyn Shin

Subject:Grappling with the Gaps: Toward a Research Agenda to Meet the Educational Needs of Children and Youth in Foster Care

Dear Colleague: We believe that improving the educational status of the almost 70,000 children and youth who are in foster care in California is an important state priority. As part of a robust initiative called Ready to Succeed, funded in large part by the San Francisco-based Stuart Foundation, scholars, policymakers and practitioners from education, child welfare, and the courts are partnering to explore and implement promising policies and practices to address the unacceptably poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. As part of this effort, some of the nation’s leading scholars and philanthropic organizations selected a dozen experts to participate in a discussion about what we do – and, most often, do not – know about strategies to improve the academic success of children and youth in foster care. The results of this discussion are documented in the attached report, Grappling with the Gaps: Toward a Research Agenda to Meet the Educational Needs of Children and Youth in Foster Care, which was prepared by WestEd and published by The Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning. The report lays the groundwork for establishing new research priorities for improving policies and practices for serving students in foster care. The recommendations are based on interviews conducted in 2009 with 12 foster care experts from across the state and country. Collectively, they describe research lags, gaps in knowledge, a paucity of research on education outcomes, and a lack of evidence-based practices that could inform our interventions and turn around outcomes for students in foster care. There is a sense of both urgency and possibility in Grappling with the Gaps. We hope that you will find the report useful and informative, that it will stimulate your thinking, and that it will even motivate you to act on its findings – by engaging in or supporting the research needed to shift policies and practices in a more effective direction. Getting to answers is requires thoughtful and deliberate action. Please feel free to share the link to Grappling with the Gaps with your colleagues. http://www.cftl.org/documents/2010/ResearchGaps.pdf

Dear Colleague: We believe that improving the educational status of the almost 70,000 children and youth who are in foster care in California is an important state priority. As part of a robust initiative called Ready to Succeed, funded in large part by the San Francisco-based Stuart Foundation, scholars, policymakers and practitioners from education, child welfare, and the courts are partnering to explore and implement promising policies and practices to address the unacceptably poor educational outcomes of students in foster care. As part of this effort, some of the nation’s leading scholars and philanthropic organizations selected a dozen experts to participate in a discussion about what we do – and, most often, do not – know about strategies to improve the academic success of children and youth in foster care. The results of this discussion are documented in the attached report, Grappling with the Gaps: Toward a Research Agenda to Meet the Educational Needs of Children and Youth in Foster Care, which was prepared by WestEd and published by The Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning. The report lays the groundwork for establishing new research priorities for improving policies and practices for serving students in foster care. The recommendations are based on interviews conducted in 2009 with 12 foster care experts from across the state and country. Collectively, they describe research lags, gaps in knowledge, a paucity of research on education outcomes, and a lack of evidence-based practices that could inform our interventions and turn around outcomes for students in foster care. There is a sense of both urgency and possibility in Grappling with the Gaps. We hope that you will find the report useful and informative, that it will stimulate your thinking, and that it will even motivate you to act on its findings – by engaging in or supporting the research needed to shift policies and practices in a more effective direction. Getting to answers is requires thoughtful and deliberate action. Please feel free to share the link to Grappling with the Gaps with your colleagues. http://www.cftl.org/documents/2010/ResearchGaps.pdf