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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8849
Date: 2011-04-06

Author:Edward De Vos

Subject:RE: adolescent help-seeking behavior

Tamara: You raise an interesting point. I suspect, however, that most actions undertaken in response to negative circumstances could be perceived by those who engage in them as “positive” responses. Whether the activity is actually in the individual’s best interest -- immediately, short-, or long-term -- requires an evaluative judgment. And that judgment, in turn, may be absolute or normative. “Running away, sexual acting out, or self harm” may result in severely negative outcomes, even if in the moment the individual may believe they have no other choice, or that these are positive alternatives to commercial sexual exploitation. Even self harm can convey a sense of self efficacy, and exercise/restore a sense of control. Perhaps you can “unpack” the issue further if you look beyond the specific help-seeking behaviors, and view the “choice” in the context of the individual’s sense of self efficacy; their decision to take action; their ability to identify/generate options; their social capital and other resources; their ability to implement/evaluate/revise their action plan; etc. Ed ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Edward De Vos, EdD - Associate Vice President for Research Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (MSPP) 617- 327-6777 Ext. 238 - www.mspp.edu 617-327-4447 (fax) mailto:edevos@mspp.edu Meeting the Need . . . Making a Difference From: bounce-14569422-14344766@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-14569422-14344766@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Hurst, Tamara Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2011 1:27 PM To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu Subject: adolescent help-seeking behavior I am conducting a literature review on the topic of adolescents and help-seeking behaviors to supplement my dissertation research on the prevention of commercial sexual exploitation of children. Much of the literature discusses determinants of whether or not adolescents will approach help sources such as parents, friends, and professionals. Are adolescent behaviors such as running away, sexual acting out, or self-harm ever considered non-verbal, covert forms of “help-seeking?” As always, I appreciate your input. Tamara Hurst, LCSW The University of Georgia Hurst28@uga.edu

Tamara: You raise an interesting point. I suspect, however, that most actions undertaken in response to negative circumstances could be perceived by those who engage in them as “positive” responses. Whether the activity is actually in the individual’s best interest -- immediately, short-, or long-term -- requires an evaluative judgment. And that judgment, in turn, may be absolute or normative. “Running away, sexual acting out, or self harm” may result in severely negative outcomes, even if in the moment the individual may believe they have no other choice, or that these are positive alternatives to commercial sexual exploitation. Even self harm can convey a sense of self efficacy, and exercise/restore a sense of control. Perhaps you can “unpack” the issue further if you look beyond the specific help-seeking behaviors, and view the “choice” in the context of the individual’s sense of self efficacy; their decision to take action; their ability to identify/generate options; their social capital and other resources; their ability to implement/evaluate/revise their action plan; etc. Ed ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Edward De Vos, EdD - Associate Vice President for Research Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (MSPP) 617- 327-6777 Ext. 238 - www.mspp.edu 617-327-4447 (fax) mailto:edevosmspp.edu Meeting the Need . . . Making a Difference From: bounce-14569422-14344766list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-14569422-14344766list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Hurst, Tamara Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2011 1:27 PM To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu Subject: adolescent help-seeking behavior I am conducting a literature review on the topic of adolescents and help-seeking behaviors to supplement my dissertation research on the prevention of commercial sexual exploitation of children. Much of the literature discusses determinants of whether or not adolescents will approach help sources such as parents, friends, and professionals. Are adolescent behaviors such as running away, sexual acting out, or self-harm ever considered non-verbal, covert forms of “help-seeking?” As always, I appreciate your input. Tamara Hurst, LCSW The University of Georgia Hurst28uga.edu