Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8844
Date: 2011-03-31

Author:Renee Seay

Subject:Re: child-maltreatment-research-l digest: March 30, 2011

Carrie, I tend to be a lurker here as I am a graduate student in Clinical psychology. I have become greatly interested as well in ADHD in children being diagnosed when PTSD is really more appropriate - and the anecdotal evidence here definitely makes me more interested. I think you will find that if you look up "complex traumatic stress disorders" or complex PTSD that you will find relevant information. I am in the process of purchasing a book on the topic that looks very inclusive called "Treating complex traumatic stress disorders: An evidence-based guide" edited by Courtois and Ford (2009). There definition is exactly the type of situation you and others have described. Obviously I have not read it (except the first pages that Amazon allows me to read) but it has received excellent reviews - and I will be buying it. Hope this helps! Renee Seay, Ph.D. Graduate Student Respecializing in Clinical Psychology Fielding Graduate University On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 12:11 AM, Child Maltreatment Researchers digest > wrote: CHILD-MALTREATMENT-RESEARCH-L Digest for Wednesday, March 30, 2011. 1. RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children 2. RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children From: Rob Longo > Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 08:57:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1 I do QEEG Brain mapping. I see a lot of youth with a Diagnosis of ADHD but when mapped do not have the classic EEG of an ADHD child. Most have a history of trauma... but also Head Injury/TBI symptoms can also mimic ADHD and PTSD. I see a lot of kids with TBI. Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC E-mail: RobertLongoLPC@gmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. This information is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. -----Original Message----- From: bounce-11655425-8144580@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-11655425-8144580@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Penny Priest Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 3:49 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children I think this is a really interesting question. I'm a clinical psychologist working in a Community Mental Health Team in the UK. I'm just finishing a lit review on working with men who have experienced childhood family violence - looking at evidence for long term effects and also systemic interventions. I chose this topic because I started to notice how many of the men I work with have experienced and/or witnessed family violence in childhood. Many of their presenting problems fit with the Trauma Symtoms Inventory and I can imagine if they were children now, a fair few might attract the diagnosis of ADHD, with the underlying problems being ignored. Sorry this doesn't really help much with your quest, though, Carrie. Best wishes Dr Penny Priest ----- Original Message ----- From: "cecox" > To: "Child Maltreatment Researchers" > Sent: Monday, March 28, 2011 2:48 AM Subject: RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children > Rosemary- I believe I was referring to Handbook of PTSD: Science and > Practice > Matthew J. Friedman MD PhD (Editor), Terence M. Keane PhD (Editor), > Patricia A. Resick PhD (Editor) > http://www.amazon.com/Handbook-PTSD-Matthew-Friedman-PhD/dp/1593854730 > > Christine > > On Sun, 30 Jan 2011 11:11:40 -0500, "Rosemary Caolo" > > wrote: >> Hello all- >> Having worked in the field of child welfare and in community mental > health >> and private practice with victims of physical/sexual abuse I could not >> agree >> more. My dissertation was a case study of a client and the ramifications > of >> ongoing CSA. I am currently teaching theory and practice to graduate >> social >> work students (many who currently work in child welfare and foster care) >> and >> would be interested in the name of the Handbook of PTSD you reference. I >> have multiple texts on trauma and PTSD but am always looking for > worthwhile >> material. >> Thanks so much for your help- >> Rosemary Caolo, PhD, LCSW >> >> -----Original Message----- >> From: bounce-7824398-11755120@list.cornell.edu >> [mailto:bounce-7824398-11755120@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of cecox >> Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 7:21 PM >> To: Child Maltreatment Researchers >> Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children >> >> Maybe in theory. >> For most practitioners a diagnosis of PTSD or more accurately, Traumatic >> Sress Syndrome (ongoing, chronic exposure), would not occur to them. They >> see the most obvious symptoms and go straight to ADHD because it is such > a >> popular diagnosis and they are so highly influenced by the pharmaceutical >> industry. If you ask them if it could be PTSD instead, they would > probably >> argue against it because they are also influenced by the traditional >> diagnostic criteria for PTSD being EVENT-based and including "threatened >> death or serious injury, or a threat to physical integrity". Living in a >> home with adults behaving in a threatening or disturbing and > unpredictable >> manner on a daily basis can produce the same symptoms but is commonly not >> considered. Also there is a prejudice that the symptoms would present as >> primarily psychological, e.g., depression and anxiety, not so much >> cognitive, physiological and behavioral symptoms. The glucocorticoids >> released in distressing situations exert effects on >> neurotransmitter/neuroendicrine functioning (the hypothalamus-pituitary >> axis, amygdala, hippocampus), impair the functioning of the prefrontal >> cortex, affect behavior, learning and memory. Stimulants can seem to help >> with symptoms of depression and inability to concentrate in PTSD, however >> the prescribing of them is misguided because they are hard on the adrenal >> glands which can have long term affects on the ability of the adrenal >> glands to produce normal levels of cortisol and also chemically alter > brain >> and endocrine function in a way that can lead to permanent problems. >> Especially in childhood when the brain is still developing. There needs > to >> be greater awareness of the possibility of PTSD in children, even in >> apparently "normal" families, and also education about natural ways to >> address the symptoms rather than using drugs. All conscientious >> pediatricians and people working with children and victims of family >> violence should take it upon themselves to read the Handbook of PTSD and >> related literature to familiarize themselves with underlying > physiological >> processes involved in PTSD. Then they will be more likely to recognize it >> and treat it effectively. >> >> Those are very good questions that you raise Carrie. Unfortunately you > will >> probably not find much in the way of research and get a lot of these "uh- >> let's not go there" type of responses. >> >> Christine Cox >> >> >> On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 19:07:52 -0500, "Dr. Bruce Borkosky, Psy.D PA" >> > wrote: >>> Any diagnosis of ADHD must have ruled out all other possible causes of >> the >>> behaviors. >>> Bruce Borkosky >>> >>> On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 1:02 PM, Carrie Ellis >>> >wrote: >>> >>>> I am looking for studies on the misdiagnosis of ADHD in abused > children. >>>> Particularly, the diagnosis of ADHD when the true diagnosis should be >>>> PTSD. >>>> Also, the consequences of prescribing stimulants to children who have >>>> been >>>> misdiagnosed. >>>> >>>> Any ideas are greatly appreciated! >>>> >>>> Carrie Ellis >>>> Policy Research Intern >>>> TexProtects >>>> >>>> >> >> No virus found in this incoming message. >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com >> Version: 9.0.872 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3412 - Release Date: 01/30/11 >> 02:34:00 > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors From: "Raelene Freitag" > Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2011 14:47:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2 Greetings, I just came across this recommendation that was pertinent to the question raised about simulation in training for child protection. The citation is below for further information. 7) All jurisdictions involved in training staff to work in the field of child protection should consider the implementation and use of mock Court rooms and a mock house. "Whoever you are" An exploration of learning and development models for professional staff in statutory child protection across the United Kingdom, Canada and the USA. 2009 Robert Ryan Obtained from http://www.churchilltrust.com.au/site_media/fellows/2009_Ryan_Robert.pdf 3/30/11 Raelene Freitag MSW, Ph.D. Director Children's Research Center 426 S. Yellowstone Drive Madison, WI 53719 608-831-1180 www.nccd-crc.org CRC is a nonprofit social research organization and division of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Please do not send any identifying or confidential information (names, birthdates) via Email. It is possible for third parties to intercept information transmitted in an Email. Case or referral numbers (but not social security numbers) may be included where necessary. Intercepting persons cannot use these numbers to identify a client unless they have access to the host application or database. From: bounce-11654424-13366172@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-11654424-13366172@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Friend, Colleen Sent: Monday, March 28, 2011 10:46 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors Barbara and Sarah, What do you mean by simulations? Do you mean role play, or the use of identified clients or discussion of a real or proxy case through the course of the training? I can tell you more if you specify. Also, USC has developed some viritual clients that help Social Workers learn to interact with military personnel and identify the signs of PTSD, etc. This has not moved into child welfare yet, but we are talking about what that might look like. Thanks, Colleen Friend Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director CSULA Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032-8170-03 Office: (323) 343-4696 Fax: (323) 343-5616 Email: cfriend@calstatela.edu > Web: www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi > ________________________________ From: bounce-11548432-8269919@list.cornell.edu on behalf of Sarah Beatty Sent: Mon 3/28/2011 11:10 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-L@cornell.edu Subject: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors Dear Fellow Colleagues, We are writing to seek your assistance in our search of the literature pertaining to the use of simulations as part of continuing education for child welfare workers/supervisors. The project is being conducted by Professors Marion Bogo and Aron Shlonsky at the University of Toronto. We are currently in the process of reviewing databases, journals, and "grey literature" and we would greatly appreciate any suggestions you might have with respect to empirical studies(including those presented only at conferences), curriculum syllabi within child welfare agencies or schools of social work, agency reports, or any other resource that may be relevant to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/supervisors. Thanks kindly in advance for your consideration of this request. We look forward to hearing from you within the next month and we will be happy to share our findings to any who are interested. Barbara Lee & Sarah Beatty barbara.lee@utoronto & sarah.beatty@utoronto.ca Research Assistants University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto ON M5S 1V4 --- END OF DIGEST

Carrie, I tend to be a lurker here as I am a graduate student in Clinical psychology. I have become greatly interested as well in ADHD in children being diagnosed when PTSD is really more appropriate - and the anecdotal evidence here definitely makes me more interested. I think you will find that if you look up "complex traumatic stress disorders" or complex PTSD that you will find relevant information. I am in the process of purchasing a book on the topic that looks very inclusive called "Treating complex traumatic stress disorders: An evidence-based guide" edited by Courtois and Ford (2009). There definition is exactly the type of situation you and others have described. Obviously I have not read it (except the first pages that Amazon allows me to read) but it has received excellent reviews - and I will be buying it. Hope this helps! Renee Seay, Ph.D. Graduate Student Respecializing in Clinical Psychology Fielding Graduate University On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 12:11 AM, Child Maltreatment Researchers digest > wrote: CHILD-MALTREATMENT-RESEARCH-L Digest for Wednesday, March 30, 2011. 1. RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children 2. RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children From: Rob Longo > Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2011 08:57:24 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1 I do QEEG Brain mapping. I see a lot of youth with a Diagnosis of ADHD but when mapped do not have the classic EEG of an ADHD child. Most have a history of trauma... but also Head Injury/TBI symptoms can also mimic ADHD and PTSD. I see a lot of kids with TBI. Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC Board Certified in Neurofeedback Serendipity Healing Arts Lexington, NC E-mail: RobertLongoLPCgmail.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the specified individual(s) only. This information is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. -----Original Message----- From: bounce-11655425-8144580list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-11655425-8144580list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Penny Priest Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 3:49 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children I think this is a really interesting question. I'm a clinical psychologist working in a Community Mental Health Team in the UK. I'm just finishing a lit review on working with men who have experienced childhood family violence - looking at evidence for long term effects and also systemic interventions. I chose this topic because I started to notice how many of the men I work with have experienced and/or witnessed family violence in childhood. Many of their presenting problems fit with the Trauma Symtoms Inventory and I can imagine if they were children now, a fair few might attract the diagnosis of ADHD, with the underlying problems being ignored. Sorry this doesn't really help much with your quest, though, Carrie. Best wishes Dr Penny Priest ----- Original Message ----- From: "cecox" > To: "Child Maltreatment Researchers" > Sent: Monday, March 28, 2011 2:48 AM Subject: RE: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children > Rosemary- I believe I was referring to Handbook of PTSD: Science and > Practice > Matthew J. Friedman MD PhD (Editor), Terence M. Keane PhD (Editor), > Patricia A. Resick PhD (Editor) > http://www.amazon.com/Handbook-PTSD-Matthew-Friedman-PhD/dp/1593854730 > > Christine > > On Sun, 30 Jan 2011 11:11:40 -0500, "Rosemary Caolo" > > wrote: >> Hello all- >> Having worked in the field of child welfare and in community mental > health >> and private practice with victims of physical/sexual abuse I could not >> agree >> more. My dissertation was a case study of a client and the ramifications > of >> ongoing CSA. I am currently teaching theory and practice to graduate >> social >> work students (many who currently work in child welfare and foster care) >> and >> would be interested in the name of the Handbook of PTSD you reference. I >> have multiple texts on trauma and PTSD but am always looking for > worthwhile >> material. >> Thanks so much for your help- >> Rosemary Caolo, PhD, LCSW >> >> -----Original Message----- >> From: bounce-7824398-11755120list.cornell.edu >> [mailto:bounce-7824398-11755120list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of cecox >> Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 7:21 PM >> To: Child Maltreatment Researchers >> Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children >> >> Maybe in theory. >> For most practitioners a diagnosis of PTSD or more accurately, Traumatic >> Sress Syndrome (ongoing, chronic exposure), would not occur to them. They >> see the most obvious symptoms and go straight to ADHD because it is such > a >> popular diagnosis and they are so highly influenced by the pharmaceutical >> industry. If you ask them if it could be PTSD instead, they would > probably >> argue against it because they are also influenced by the traditional >> diagnostic criteria for PTSD being EVENT-based and including "threatened >> death or serious injury, or a threat to physical integrity". Living in a >> home with adults behaving in a threatening or disturbing and > unpredictable >> manner on a daily basis can produce the same symptoms but is commonly not >> considered. Also there is a prejudice that the symptoms would present as >> primarily psychological, e.g., depression and anxiety, not so much >> cognitive, physiological and behavioral symptoms. The glucocorticoids >> released in distressing situations exert effects on >> neurotransmitter/neuroendicrine functioning (the hypothalamus-pituitary >> axis, amygdala, hippocampus), impair the functioning of the prefrontal >> cortex, affect behavior, learning and memory. Stimulants can seem to help >> with symptoms of depression and inability to concentrate in PTSD, however >> the prescribing of them is misguided because they are hard on the adrenal >> glands which can have long term affects on the ability of the adrenal >> glands to produce normal levels of cortisol and also chemically alter > brain >> and endocrine function in a way that can lead to permanent problems. >> Especially in childhood when the brain is still developing. There needs > to >> be greater awareness of the possibility of PTSD in children, even in >> apparently "normal" families, and also education about natural ways to >> address the symptoms rather than using drugs. All conscientious >> pediatricians and people working with children and victims of family >> violence should take it upon themselves to read the Handbook of PTSD and >> related literature to familiarize themselves with underlying > physiological >> processes involved in PTSD. Then they will be more likely to recognize it >> and treat it effectively. >> >> Those are very good questions that you raise Carrie. Unfortunately you > will >> probably not find much in the way of research and get a lot of these "uh- >> let's not go there" type of responses. >> >> Christine Cox >> >> >> On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 19:07:52 -0500, "Dr. Bruce Borkosky, Psy.D PA" >> > wrote: >>> Any diagnosis of ADHD must have ruled out all other possible causes of >> the >>> behaviors. >>> Bruce Borkosky >>> >>> On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 1:02 PM, Carrie Ellis >>> >wrote: >>> >>>> I am looking for studies on the misdiagnosis of ADHD in abused > children. >>>> Particularly, the diagnosis of ADHD when the true diagnosis should be >>>> PTSD. >>>> Also, the consequences of prescribing stimulants to children who have >>>> been >>>> misdiagnosed. >>>> >>>> Any ideas are greatly appreciated! >>>> >>>> Carrie Ellis >>>> Policy Research Intern >>>> TexProtects >>>> >>>> >> >> No virus found in this incoming message. >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com >> Version: 9.0.872 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3412 - Release Date: 01/30/11 >> 02:34:00 > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors From: "Raelene Freitag" > Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2011 14:47:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2 Greetings, I just came across this recommendation that was pertinent to the question raised about simulation in training for child protection. The citation is below for further information. 7) All jurisdictions involved in training staff to work in the field of child protection should consider the implementation and use of mock Court rooms and a mock house. "Whoever you are" An exploration of learning and development models for professional staff in statutory child protection across the United Kingdom, Canada and the USA. 2009 Robert Ryan Obtained from http://www.churchilltrust.com.au/site_media/fellows/2009_Ryan_Robert.pdf 3/30/11 Raelene Freitag MSW, Ph.D. Director Children's Research Center 426 S. Yellowstone Drive Madison, WI 53719 608-831-1180 www.nccd-crc.org CRC is a nonprofit social research organization and division of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Please do not send any identifying or confidential information (names, birthdates) via Email. It is possible for third parties to intercept information transmitted in an Email. Case or referral numbers (but not social security numbers) may be included where necessary. Intercepting persons cannot use these numbers to identify a client unless they have access to the host application or database. From: bounce-11654424-13366172list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-11654424-13366172list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Friend, Colleen Sent: Monday, March 28, 2011 10:46 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: RE: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors Barbara and Sarah, What do you mean by simulations? Do you mean role play, or the use of identified clients or discussion of a real or proxy case through the course of the training? I can tell you more if you specify. Also, USC has developed some viritual clients that help Social Workers learn to interact with military personnel and identify the signs of PTSD, etc. This has not moved into child welfare yet, but we are talking about what that might look like. Thanks, Colleen Friend Colleen Friend, Ph.D., LCSW Director CSULA Child Abuse and Family Violence Institute Department of Communication Disorders 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032-8170-03 Office: (323) 343-4696 Fax: (323) 343-5616 Email: cfriendcalstatela.edu > Web: www.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/cafvi > ________________________________ From: bounce-11548432-8269919list.cornell.edu on behalf of Sarah Beatty Sent: Mon 3/28/2011 11:10 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-Lcornell.edu Subject: CMRL List Posting: Seeking Literature on Continuing Education for Child Welfare Workers/Supervisors Dear Fellow Colleagues, We are writing to seek your assistance in our search of the literature pertaining to the use of simulations as part of continuing education for child welfare workers/supervisors. The project is being conducted by Professors Marion Bogo and Aron Shlonsky at the University of Toronto. We are currently in the process of reviewing databases, journals, and "grey literature" and we would greatly appreciate any suggestions you might have with respect to empirical studies(including those presented only at conferences), curriculum syllabi within child welfare agencies or schools of social work, agency reports, or any other resource that may be relevant to the use of simulations to train child welfare workers/supervisors. Thanks kindly in advance for your consideration of this request. We look forward to hearing from you within the next month and we will be happy to share our findings to any who are interested. Barbara Lee & Sarah Beatty barbara.leeutoronto & sarah.beattyutoronto.ca Research Assistants University of Toronto 246 Bloor Street West Toronto ON M5S 1V4 --- END OF DIGEST