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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8813
Date: 2011-02-15

Author:Felicia Freeman

Subject:RE: Assessing Levels of Force or Fear

That is quite a question. The only avenue I can think of is within emergency rooms where children are brought in immediately following trauma. An fmri could detect what’s happened in the amygdalia as it is our fear response center, and of course physical exams and exrays can estimate the level of force. I am guessing that forensic science has provided information regarding the level of force/torque it takes to break each kind of bone, joint, etc. Because the fmri would not have a ‘before’ picture, we would only generally be able to say, this is what an amygdalia looks like as a result of this kind of trauma, and just imagine the level of fear arousal to get this kind of response. I’m positive, because of issues relating to resiliency and the phenomenon of chronic exposure that we will never be able to “know” the level of fear. We will be able to know the level of force, though. Pitty the researchers for the question, though. Felicia I. Freeman, President Children First 4708 Dogwood Drive, Everett, WA 98203 P.O. Box 2629, Everett, WA 98213-2629 (425) 259-0146 (425) 293-0333 direct (425) 346-8414 cell www.deaconesschildren.org Transforming lives of children in the Pacific North West by breaking the cycle of Child Abuse and Neglect. Deaconess Children’s Services is a champion of hope and opportunity for children and their families, especially those in greatest need, empowering them to BELIEVE in a life full of possibilities. ________________________________ From: bounce-8171881-13481403@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-8171881-13481403@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carol Duncan Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 11:09 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Assessing Levels of Force or Fear >"Regarding abuse/neglect in your agencies/work, is there any effort to quantify such things as level of force/level of fear? " I haven't seen a response to this question on the list, but it seems to me that this kind of research would be impossible to conduct in any scientific manner if looking at retrospective cases, and unethical/illegal to conduct on live subjects. There are so many confounding variables, including prior history of trauma, that would have a direct effect on an individual's response to a particular traumatic event. Also, individuals who have developed some degree of resiliency may have a different response to a particular level of abuse as compared to someone with a history of trauma. I do not see how this research could be conducted. Carol S. Duncan, LCSW Manager, Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention Office Dallas Independent School District 2909 N. Buckner Blvd., Suite 505 Dallas, TX 75228 (972) 502-4182 Fax: (972) 794-3528 cduncan@dallasisd.org Confidentiality Notice: This email message, including all attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential student and/or employee information. Unauthorized use and/or disclosure is prohibited under the federal Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. §1232g, 34 CFR Part 99, 19 TAC 247.2, Texas Government Code 552.023, Texas Education Code 21.355, 29 CFR 1630.14(b)(c)). If you are not the intended recipient, you may not use, disclose, copy or disseminate this information. Please call the sender immediately or reply by email and destroy all copies of the original message, including attachments.

That is quite a question. The only avenue I can think of is within emergency rooms where children are brought in immediately following trauma. An fmri could detect what’s happened in the amygdalia as it is our fear response center, and of course physical exams and exrays can estimate the level of force. I am guessing that forensic science has provided information regarding the level of force/torque it takes to break each kind of bone, joint, etc. Because the fmri would not have a ‘before’ picture, we would only generally be able to say, this is what an amygdalia looks like as a result of this kind of trauma, and just imagine the level of fear arousal to get this kind of response. I’m positive, because of issues relating to resiliency and the phenomenon of chronic exposure that we will never be able to “know” the level of fear. We will be able to know the level of force, though. Pitty the researchers for the question, though. Felicia I. Freeman, President Children First 4708 Dogwood Drive, Everett, WA 98203 P.O. Box 2629, Everett, WA 98213-2629 (425) 259-0146 (425) 293-0333 direct (425) 346-8414 cell www.deaconesschildren.org Transforming lives of children in the Pacific North West by breaking the cycle of Child Abuse and Neglect. Deaconess Children’s Services is a champion of hope and opportunity for children and their families, especially those in greatest need, empowering them to BELIEVE in a life full of possibilities. ________________________________ From: bounce-8171881-13481403list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-8171881-13481403list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Carol Duncan Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2011 11:09 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: Assessing Levels of Force or Fear >"Regarding abuse/neglect in your agencies/work, is there any effort to quantify such things as level of force/level of fear? " I haven't seen a response to this question on the list, but it seems to me that this kind of research would be impossible to conduct in any scientific manner if looking at retrospective cases, and unethical/illegal to conduct on live subjects. There are so many confounding variables, including prior history of trauma, that would have a direct effect on an individual's response to a particular traumatic event. Also, individuals who have developed some degree of resiliency may have a different response to a particular level of abuse as compared to someone with a history of trauma. I do not see how this research could be conducted. Carol S. Duncan, LCSW Manager, Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Prevention Office Dallas Independent School District 2909 N. Buckner Blvd., Suite 505 Dallas, TX 75228 (972) 502-4182 Fax: (972) 794-3528 cduncandallasisd.org Confidentiality Notice: This email message, including all attachments, is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential student and/or employee information. Unauthorized use and/or disclosure is prohibited under the federal Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. §1232g, 34 CFR Part 99, 19 TAC 247.2, Texas Government Code 552.023, Texas Education Code 21.355, 29 CFR 1630.14(b)(c)). If you are not the intended recipient, you may not use, disclose, copy or disseminate this information. Please call the sender immediately or reply by email and destroy all copies of the original message, including attachments.