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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8804
Date: 2011-02-01

Author:Lucy Hudson

Subject:Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children

Let me add another often overlooked piece in the ADHD puzzle: prenatal exposure to alcohol which often exists in homes where children (and their parents before them) experience the ongoing trauma of severe family dysfunction. Sent from my iPhone On Jan 30, 2011, at 4:23 PM, "Rob Longo" wrote: > Christine: > > I couldn't agree with you more. I am working with a case that is a > classic example of what you have just written. Hx of severe > childhood trauma, abuse & Neglect and a Dx of CD and ADHD by > previous clinician! > > I do QEEGT brain maps and see what you describe in many cases. > > Rob > > Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC > Board Certified in Neurofeedback > Serendipity Healing Arts > Lexington, NC > > E-mail: RobertLongoLPC@gmail.com > > CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message > and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic > Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain > information intended for the specified individual(s) only. This > information is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient > or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, > you are hereby notified that you have received this document in > error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of > any action based on the contents of this information is strictly > prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please > notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7824398-8144580@list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7824398-8144580@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of cecox > Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 7:21 PM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children > > Maybe in theory. > For most practitioners a diagnosis of PTSD or more accurately, > Traumatic > Sress Syndrome (ongoing, chronic exposure), would not occur to them. > They > see the most obvious symptoms and go straight to ADHD because it is > such a > popular diagnosis and they are so highly influenced by the > pharmaceutical > industry. If you ask them if it could be PTSD instead, they would > probably > argue against it because they are also influenced by the traditional > diagnostic criteria for PTSD being EVENT-based and including > "threatened > death or serious injury, or a threat to physical integrity". Living > in a > home with adults behaving in a threatening or disturbing and > unpredictable > manner on a daily basis can produce the same symptoms but is > commonly not > considered. Also there is a prejudice that the symptoms would > present as > primarily psychological, e.g., depression and anxiety, not so much > cognitive, physiological and behavioral symptoms. The glucocorticoids > released in distressing situations exert effects on > neurotransmitter/neuroendicrine functioning (the hypothalamus- > pituitary > axis, amygdala, hippocampus), impair the functioning of the prefrontal > cortex, affect behavior, learning and memory. Stimulants can seem to > help > with symptoms of depression and inability to concentrate in PTSD, > however > the prescribing of them is misguided because they are hard on the > adrenal > glands which can have long term affects on the ability of the adrenal > glands to produce normal levels of cortisol and also chemically > alter brain > and endocrine function in a way that can lead to permanent problems. > Especially in childhood when the brain is still developing. There > needs to > be greater awareness of the possibility of PTSD in children, even in > apparently "normal" families, and also education about natural ways to > address the symptoms rather than using drugs. All conscientious > pediatricians and people working with children and victims of family > violence should take it upon themselves to read the Handbook of PTSD > and > related literature to familiarize themselves with underlying > physiological > processes involved in PTSD. Then they will be more likely to > recognize it > and treat it effectively. > > Those are very good questions that you raise Carrie. Unfortunately > you will > probably not find much in the way of research and get a lot of these > "uh- > let's not go there" type of responses. > > Christine Cox > > > On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 19:07:52 -0500, "Dr. Bruce Borkosky, Psy.D PA" > wrote: >> Any diagnosis of ADHD must have ruled out all other possible causes >> of > the >> behaviors. >> Bruce Borkosky >> >> On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 1:02 PM, Carrie Ellis >> wrote: >> >>> I am looking for studies on the misdiagnosis of ADHD in abused >>> children. >>> Particularly, the diagnosis of ADHD when the true diagnosis should >>> be >>> PTSD. >>> Also, the consequences of prescribing stimulants to children who >>> have >>> been >>> misdiagnosed. >>> >>> Any ideas are greatly appreciated! >>> >>> Carrie Ellis >>> Policy Research Intern >>> TexProtects >>> >>> > > >

Let me add another often overlooked piece in the ADHD puzzle: prenatal exposure to alcohol which often exists in homes where children (and their parents before them) experience the ongoing trauma of severe family dysfunction. Sent from my iPhone On Jan 30, 2011, at 4:23 PM, "Rob Longo" wrote: > Christine: > > I couldn't agree with you more. I am working with a case that is a > classic example of what you have just written. Hx of severe > childhood trauma, abuse & Neglect and a Dx of CD and ADHD by > previous clinician! > > I do QEEGT brain maps and see what you describe in many cases. > > Rob > > Robert E. Longo, MRC, LPC, NCC > Board Certified in Neurofeedback > Serendipity Healing Arts > Lexington, NC > > E-mail: RobertLongoLPCgmail.com > > CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message > and accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic > Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain > information intended for the specified individual(s) only. This > information is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient > or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, > you are hereby notified that you have received this document in > error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking of > any action based on the contents of this information is strictly > prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please > notify us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7824398-8144580list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7824398-8144580list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of cecox > Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 7:21 PM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Subject: Re: Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Abused Children > > Maybe in theory. > For most practitioners a diagnosis of PTSD or more accurately, > Traumatic > Sress Syndrome (ongoing, chronic exposure), would not occur to them. > They > see the most obvious symptoms and go straight to ADHD because it is > such a > popular diagnosis and they are so highly influenced by the > pharmaceutical > industry. If you ask them if it could be PTSD instead, they would > probably > argue against it because they are also influenced by the traditional > diagnostic criteria for PTSD being EVENT-based and including > "threatened > death or serious injury, or a threat to physical integrity". Living > in a > home with adults behaving in a threatening or disturbing and > unpredictable > manner on a daily basis can produce the same symptoms but is > commonly not > considered. Also there is a prejudice that the symptoms would > present as > primarily psychological, e.g., depression and anxiety, not so much > cognitive, physiological and behavioral symptoms. The glucocorticoids > released in distressing situations exert effects on > neurotransmitter/neuroendicrine functioning (the hypothalamus- > pituitary > axis, amygdala, hippocampus), impair the functioning of the prefrontal > cortex, affect behavior, learning and memory. Stimulants can seem to > help > with symptoms of depression and inability to concentrate in PTSD, > however > the prescribing of them is misguided because they are hard on the > adrenal > glands which can have long term affects on the ability of the adrenal > glands to produce normal levels of cortisol and also chemically > alter brain > and endocrine function in a way that can lead to permanent problems. > Especially in childhood when the brain is still developing. There > needs to > be greater awareness of the possibility of PTSD in children, even in > apparently "normal" families, and also education about natural ways to > address the symptoms rather than using drugs. All conscientious > pediatricians and people working with children and victims of family > violence should take it upon themselves to read the Handbook of PTSD > and > related literature to familiarize themselves with underlying > physiological > processes involved in PTSD. Then they will be more likely to > recognize it > and treat it effectively. > > Those are very good questions that you raise Carrie. Unfortunately > you will > probably not find much in the way of research and get a lot of these > "uh- > let's not go there" type of responses. > > Christine Cox > > > On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 19:07:52 -0500, "Dr. Bruce Borkosky, Psy.D PA" > wrote: >> Any diagnosis of ADHD must have ruled out all other possible causes >> of > the >> behaviors. >> Bruce Borkosky >> >> On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 1:02 PM, Carrie Ellis >> wrote: >> >>> I am looking for studies on the misdiagnosis of ADHD in abused >>> children. >>> Particularly, the diagnosis of ADHD when the true diagnosis should >>> be >>> PTSD. >>> Also, the consequences of prescribing stimulants to children who >>> have >>> been >>> misdiagnosed. >>> >>> Any ideas are greatly appreciated! >>> >>> Carrie Ellis >>> Policy Research Intern >>> TexProtects >>> >>> > > >