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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8766
Date: 2010-12-20

Author:Natia Partskhaladze

Subject:Re: impact of poor quality foster care

Dear All, The above correspondence regarding the quality foster care is very interesting and timely for me. I am at the initial stage of the PhD research aiming at comparing quality of lives of deinstitutionalized children in foster and small group home care (the only available family-like alternatives in my country – Georgia). Living in the country were assess to the scientific literature is quite limited, I have not been able to get hold of some articles suggested by you (i.e. Berger, L.M., et al. (2009). Estimating the ‘impact’ of out-of-home placement on child well-being: Approaching the problem of selection bias. Child Development, 80, 1856-1876 - suggested by Kristen Slack). Hence, I would very much appreciate your assistance in providing: - the above and any other relevant articles related to the well-being of children in foster or SGH care), - any instruments used for measuring subjective well-being, life satisfaction, quality of life of children in care. I very much look forward to hearing from you. Thank you in advance, Natia Partskhaladze, MD, MSW On Wed, Dec 8, 2010 at 9:20 PM, Davis, Mary A > wrote: Dear All, I am from Texas, working on a project at my university FORWARD to insure success of ex fosters, http://www.shsu.edu/~forward/ . I am looking for data to be used for both research and grant applications. Texas is legislatively required to complete an annual survey of youth who have transitioned to independent living, admittedly limited to those who complete the survey, about 400 youth completed the survey in 2009, so I am looking for administrative data. Is there any resource that provides information about which states have the linked data, foster care/child welfare with criminal justice data and educational data, such as was used by Doyle? (I am downloading the Casey Foundation articles.) Thanks, Mary Ann Davis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology Sam Houston State University P O Box 2446 1901 Avenue I, Suite 270 N Huntsville, TX 77341-2446 mad011@shsu.edu 936-294-4083 936-294-3573 (fax) -----Original Message----- From: bounce-7509615-6841094@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7509615-6841094@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 8:31 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: jjdoyle@mit.edu Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care Dear All, I'd like to offer two points of clarification. First, I don't think that Dr. Ryan was suggesting that Dr. Doyle's methodology was flawed. Certainly MIT expects high standards for rigor and internal validity. Instead, I believe he was taking issue with flawed interpretations - including my own. Because I'm not a methodologist, I took Dr. Ryan's correction to heart and appreciated his guidance. Second, as an affiliate member and former lobbyist for Foster Care Alumni of America, I would offer that former foster youth are notoriously difficult to track. Those that participate in surveys and alumni events tend to be higher functioning, more stable alumni. Yet, many of these alumni - though they have jobs, are in school, and have begun their own families - share stories of unimaginable experiences before, during, and after foster care. But many will also tell you that whether that experience was good or bad - separation from their families was necessary. Please understand that when FCAA holds events, they always include an "empty chair" at the table for the young people who are not functioning well enough to participate in sharing their stories - they are homeless, deceased, incarcerated, etc. These are the kids that are missed in studies and, unfortunately, in advocacy efforts. So it is not accurate to say that research taps the lowest-functioning, disgruntled youth who are willing and available to share their stories. I've copied Dr. Doyle on this exchange so that if available he can explain his methodology to us all. Best, Ruthie Ruth White, MSSA Executive Director National Center for Housing & Child Welfare 6711 Queens Chapel Rd University Park, MD 20782 phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 fax 301-699-0152 rwhite@nchcw.org www.nchcw.org Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. -----Original Message----- From: bounce-7508795-12859385@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7508795-12859385@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Poha Kane Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 11:07 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick > wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhite@nchcw.org ] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhite@nchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of > wendy.rha@utoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > >

Dear All, The above correspondence regarding the quality foster care is very interesting and timely for me. I am at the initial stage of the PhD research aiming at comparing quality of lives of deinstitutionalized children in foster and small group home care (the only available family-like alternatives in my country – Georgia). Living in the country were assess to the scientific literature is quite limited, I have not been able to get hold of some articles suggested by you (i.e. Berger, L.M., et al. (2009). Estimating the ‘impact’ of out-of-home placement on child well-being: Approaching the problem of selection bias. Child Development, 80, 1856-1876 - suggested by Kristen Slack). Hence, I would very much appreciate your assistance in providing: - the above and any other relevant articles related to the well-being of children in foster or SGH care), - any instruments used for measuring subjective well-being, life satisfaction, quality of life of children in care. I very much look forward to hearing from you. Thank you in advance, Natia Partskhaladze, MD, MSW On Wed, Dec 8, 2010 at 9:20 PM, Davis, Mary A > wrote: Dear All, I am from Texas, working on a project at my university FORWARD to insure success of ex fosters, http://www.shsu.edu/~forward/ . I am looking for data to be used for both research and grant applications. Texas is legislatively required to complete an annual survey of youth who have transitioned to independent living, admittedly limited to those who complete the survey, about 400 youth completed the survey in 2009, so I am looking for administrative data. Is there any resource that provides information about which states have the linked data, foster care/child welfare with criminal justice data and educational data, such as was used by Doyle? (I am downloading the Casey Foundation articles.) Thanks, Mary Ann Davis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Sociology Sam Houston State University P O Box 2446 1901 Avenue I, Suite 270 N Huntsville, TX 77341-2446 mad011shsu.edu 936-294-4083 936-294-3573 (fax) -----Original Message----- From: bounce-7509615-6841094list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7509615-6841094list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 8:31 AM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Cc: jjdoylemit.edu Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care Dear All, I'd like to offer two points of clarification. First, I don't think that Dr. Ryan was suggesting that Dr. Doyle's methodology was flawed. Certainly MIT expects high standards for rigor and internal validity. Instead, I believe he was taking issue with flawed interpretations - including my own. Because I'm not a methodologist, I took Dr. Ryan's correction to heart and appreciated his guidance. Second, as an affiliate member and former lobbyist for Foster Care Alumni of America, I would offer that former foster youth are notoriously difficult to track. Those that participate in surveys and alumni events tend to be higher functioning, more stable alumni. Yet, many of these alumni - though they have jobs, are in school, and have begun their own families - share stories of unimaginable experiences before, during, and after foster care. But many will also tell you that whether that experience was good or bad - separation from their families was necessary. Please understand that when FCAA holds events, they always include an "empty chair" at the table for the young people who are not functioning well enough to participate in sharing their stories - they are homeless, deceased, incarcerated, etc. These are the kids that are missed in studies and, unfortunately, in advocacy efforts. So it is not accurate to say that research taps the lowest-functioning, disgruntled youth who are willing and available to share their stories. I've copied Dr. Doyle on this exchange so that if available he can explain his methodology to us all. Best, Ruthie Ruth White, MSSA Executive Director National Center for Housing & Child Welfare 6711 Queens Chapel Rd University Park, MD 20782 phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 fax 301-699-0152 rwhitenchcw.org www.nchcw.org Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. -----Original Message----- From: bounce-7508795-12859385list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7508795-12859385list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Poha Kane Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 11:07 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick > wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhitenchcw.org ] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhitenchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu ] On Behalf Of > wendy.rhautoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > >