Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8765
Date: 2010-12-17

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: Economic impact of child maltreatment

"Cost to society" and "economic impact" are also different things. On the one hand, goods and services are arguably added, along with a "multiplier" effect. On the other hand, society's productivity is decreased in some respects. Sheri McMahon > From: Mark-Chaffin@ouhsc.edu > To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu > Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2010 08:35:44 -0600 > Subject: RE: Economic impact of child maltreatment > > You might want to look at the critique of these estimates by Corso, published this year in the journal Child Abuse and Neglect. IMO, the available "long term cost to society" estimates are poor. Some of these estimates were put together years ago by folks in the advocacy community and (like many things advocacy) are wildly inflated by almost any reasonable standard. For example, in some of these estimates 100% of the differences between abused and non-abused children in something economically relevant like, say, downstream adult incarceration rates, are attributed to maltreatment alone which is simply not credible. Its complicated enough trying to ascertain the near-term child welfare system costs, let alone parsing out effects for things that might occur decades down the line. Lives are complicated things, and its not so simple to determine that, "this non-experimental event, which was one part of lots of intercorrelated biopsychosocial variables, is responsible for X% of this outcome you experienced 40 years later, and has cost of $X attached to it." Too many assumptions required. This is why, personally, I'd stay away from the long-term estimates---I'm not sure I trust them. The shorter-term and more directly connected costs, such as the cost of a child welfare case or a foster care placement, may be more reliable. The Washington State Institute for Public Policy recently has developed a computerized tool to help individual programs or jurisdictions summarize these costs, and has published some cost analyses of their, all available on their web site. > > MC > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7530701-8864685@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7530701-8864685@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaw, Terry > Sent: Thursday, 16 December 2010 11:16 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: Economic impact of child maltreatment > > Hello, I am looking for resources related to the economic impact of child maltreatment on states or the nation at large. Any assistance with references, manuscripts, or tools would be much appreciated. > > Thank you, > Terry V. Shaw > tshaw@ssw.umaryland.edu > > >

"Cost to society" and "economic impact" are also different things. On the one hand, goods and services are arguably added, along with a "multiplier" effect. On the other hand, society's productivity is decreased in some respects. Sheri McMahon > From: Mark-Chaffinouhsc.edu > To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu > Date: Fri, 17 Dec 2010 08:35:44 -0600 > Subject: RE: Economic impact of child maltreatment > > You might want to look at the critique of these estimates by Corso, published this year in the journal Child Abuse and Neglect. IMO, the available "long term cost to society" estimates are poor. Some of these estimates were put together years ago by folks in the advocacy community and (like many things advocacy) are wildly inflated by almost any reasonable standard. For example, in some of these estimates 100% of the differences between abused and non-abused children in something economically relevant like, say, downstream adult incarceration rates, are attributed to maltreatment alone which is simply not credible. Its complicated enough trying to ascertain the near-term child welfare system costs, let alone parsing out effects for things that might occur decades down the line. Lives are complicated things, and its not so simple to determine that, "this non-experimental event, which was one part of lots of intercorrelated biopsychosocial variables, is responsible for X% of this outcome you experienced 40 years later, and has cost of $X attached to it." Too many assumptions required. This is why, personally, I'd stay away from the long-term estimates---I'm not sure I trust them. The shorter-term and more directly connected costs, such as the cost of a child welfare case or a foster care placement, may be more reliable. The Washington State Institute for Public Policy recently has developed a computerized tool to help individual programs or jurisdictions summarize these costs, and has published some cost analyses of their, all available on their web site. > > MC > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7530701-8864685list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7530701-8864685list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Shaw, Terry > Sent: Thursday, 16 December 2010 11:16 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: Economic impact of child maltreatment > > Hello, I am looking for resources related to the economic impact of child maltreatment on states or the nation at large. Any assistance with references, manuscripts, or tools would be much appreciated. > > Thank you, > Terry V. Shaw > tshawssw.umaryland.edu > > >