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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8738
Date: 2010-12-08

Author:Ryan, Joseph Patrick

Subject:RE: impact of poor quality foster care

The Doyle study relied on administrative data, not survey data, so response bias was not a problem. There was a subsequent question posted on the listserv about the size of this marginal population. Professor Doyle has another paper using similar methodology (focus is on foster care and adult crime) and does discuss which cases are most likely to be on the margins. Papers can be found at: http://www.mit.edu/~jjdoyle/research.html Best, Joe ________________________________________ From: bounce-7508795-9340674@list.cornell.edu [bounce-7508795-9340674@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Poha Kane [pohaku.kane@gmail.com] Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 10:07 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhite@nchcw.org] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhite@nchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of > wendy.rha@utoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > >

The Doyle study relied on administrative data, not survey data, so response bias was not a problem. There was a subsequent question posted on the listserv about the size of this marginal population. Professor Doyle has another paper using similar methodology (focus is on foster care and adult crime) and does discuss which cases are most likely to be on the margins. Papers can be found at: http://www.mit.edu/~jjdoyle/research.html Best, Joe ________________________________________ From: bounce-7508795-9340674list.cornell.edu [bounce-7508795-9340674list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Poha Kane [pohaku.kanegmail.com] Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 10:07 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhitenchcw.org] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhitenchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of > wendy.rhautoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > >