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Message ID: 8731
Date: 2010-12-08

Author:Joshua P Mersky

Subject:Re: impact of poor quality foster care

Don's comment is an instructive one. Few studies have actually compared maltreated children placed in out-of-home care to similar maltreated children who are not placed outside the home. Among those, even fewer have adequately parceled out selection effects. Two recent exceptions to which you might refer: Berger, L.M., et al. (2009). Estimating the ‘impact’ of out-of-home placement on child well-being: Approaching the problem of selection bias. Child Development, 80, 1856-1876. Berzin, S. C. (2008). Difficulties in the transition to adulthood: Using propensity scoring to understand what makes foster youth vulnerable. Social Service Review, 82, 171–195. Both studies find that between-group differences are non-significant once in-home and out-of-home groups are appropriately matched. Josh ----- Original Message ----- From: NCCPR@aol.com To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Sent: Wednesday, December 8, 2010 7:52:12 AM Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care It is disappointing that some would indulge in speculation about what they "recall" about a study's methodology - speculation which, in this case, is incorrect - when the study is readily available online. There are, in fact, two studies, and anyone who goes to Prof. Doyle's faculty page at MIT: http://www.mit.edu/~jjdoyle/ and clicks on the "research" tab on the left, below his picture, can find the links. It's also worth searching for this study, which uses different methodology but has similar findings: Byron Egeland, et. al., “The impact of foster care on development” Development and Psychopathology, (Vol. 18, 2006, pp. 57–76). The way some people on this list respond whenever the Doyle studies are mentioned might be a phenomenon worth studying in itself. Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org In a message dated 12/8/2010 8:18:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, pohaku.kane@gmail.com writes: Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhite@nchcw.org] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhite@nchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of > wendy.rha@utoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > > -- Assistant Professor of Social Work Helen Bader School of Social Welfare University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 Phone: 414-229-0522 Fax: 414-229-5311

Don's comment is an instructive one. Few studies have actually compared maltreated children placed in out-of-home care to similar maltreated children who are not placed outside the home. Among those, even fewer have adequately parceled out selection effects. Two recent exceptions to which you might refer: Berger, L.M., et al. (2009). Estimating the ‘impact’ of out-of-home placement on child well-being: Approaching the problem of selection bias. Child Development, 80, 1856-1876. Berzin, S. C. (2008). Difficulties in the transition to adulthood: Using propensity scoring to understand what makes foster youth vulnerable. Social Service Review, 82, 171–195. Both studies find that between-group differences are non-significant once in-home and out-of-home groups are appropriately matched. Josh ----- Original Message ----- From: NCCPRaol.com To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Sent: Wednesday, December 8, 2010 7:52:12 AM Subject: Re: impact of poor quality foster care It is disappointing that some would indulge in speculation about what they "recall" about a study's methodology - speculation which, in this case, is incorrect - when the study is readily available online. There are, in fact, two studies, and anyone who goes to Prof. Doyle's faculty page at MIT: http://www.mit.edu/~jjdoyle/ and clicks on the "research" tab on the left, below his picture, can find the links. It's also worth searching for this study, which uses different methodology but has similar findings: Byron Egeland, et. al., “The impact of foster care on development” Development and Psychopathology, (Vol. 18, 2006, pp. 57–76). The way some people on this list respond whenever the Doyle studies are mentioned might be a phenomenon worth studying in itself. Richard Wexler Executive Director National Coalition for Child Protection Reform 53 Skyhill Road (Suite 202) Alexandria VA 22314 703-212-2006 www.nccpr.org In a message dated 12/8/2010 8:18:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, pohaku.kanegmail.com writes: Joe, you are correct. And the survey was done, as I recall, with a request for voluntary reporting by the emancipated youths from foster care. I do not believe there was any records review for the foster graduates. No offense intended but there is a possibility that those who fared worse might be more likely to report back, and those that did well are too busy living their lives to want to discuss past family, personal, and foster situations for a survey. Smooth roads draw no notice, bumps do. Possibly Doyle found a way to correct for the variables? Don On 12/7/10, Ryan, Joseph Patrick wrote: > Wendy, > > Just to clarify, it is not entirely accurate to state that Doyle compared > foster care alumni to the outcomes of children who received in home services > - although this is generally how these findings have been interpreted. It > is important to note that Doyle compared cases "on the margin" and his > measure of foster care included a variety of substitute care placement > settings (not simply a family based foster home). And yes, there was no > measure of quality. > > Joe > > > > ________________________________________ > From: bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu > [bounce-7506851-9340674list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Ruth Anne White > [rwhitenchcw.org] > Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 7:56 AM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers; > Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: RE: impact of poor quality foster care > > Dear Wendy, > > You may wish to read the 2007 study, Child Protection and Child Outcomes: > Measuring the Effects of Foster Care by Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. Dr. Doyle is a > professor at MIT and accordingly, this study appears in the American > Economic Review - a rather unusual source for foster care studies! I don't > believe this study controlled for the quality of foster care. Rather, the > author compares outcomes of foster care alumni to the outcomes of children > from similar homes who received in-home services and thus were able to > remain with their families. > > Best, > Ruthie > > Ruth White, MSSA > Executive Director > National Center for Housing & Child Welfare > 6711 Queens Chapel Rd > University Park, MD 20782 > phone 301-699-0151 toll free 866-790-6766 > fax 301-699-0152 > rwhitenchcw.org > www.nchcw.org > > Strengthening America's families through affordable housing. > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-7504979-12859385list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of > wendy.rhautoronto.ca > Sent: Monday, December 06, 2010 6:21 PM > To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu > Subject: impact of poor quality foster care > > Hello everyone, > > I am wondering if there has been any previous or current research on > the impact of poor quality foster care on children/youth's wellbeing > (emotional, physical, mental, etc.). Can anyone suggest any literature > that addresses this in some way? > > Thanks, > > Wendy Rha, MSW RSW > > -- Assistant Professor of Social Work Helen Bader School of Social Welfare University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 Phone: 414-229-0522 Fax: 414-229-5311