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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8709
Date: 2010-12-02

Author:Rauktis, Mary E Murphy

Subject:RE: parents with mental illness

Hi Sheri I know in some of my qualitative interviews on a study that I did recently in my county, that I heard that Judges could be a key group in that they can point out that someone can’t be “punished” for having a mental illness. Several caseworkers talked of how judges were effective in reminding caseworkers, DA’s and extended families that people with mental illness still have civil rights and that prevention and supporting parents was also important. It led me to wonder if anyone has done a special mental health court for parents involved in Child welfare system? I do agree that we seem to have better preventative programs for families with developmental disabilities. One place that may have some research on effective programs for parents with a diagnosed mental illness/ child welfare involvement is the early head start literature. This seems to be something that they have been talking about, at least locally in my county. Mary E Rauktis Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor The University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work Child Welfare Education and Research Program office 412.648.1225 personal 412 716 9061 fax 412.624.1159 mar104@pitt.edu www.socialwork.pitt.edu From: bounce-7488902-14235796@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7488902-14235796@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of D F MCMAHON Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2010 7:56 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: parents with mental illness As an advisory council member for a 6-county human services system (within state government) I am interested in promoting services geared towards parents with mental illness who are involved with the child welfare system. Some obvious points: Parents with diagnosed mental illness are more likely than other parents to become involved with the child welfare system and to lose custody of their children; Parents may be subject to vague allegations of "unresolved mental health issues" by child welfare professionals and lack adequate resources to ensure that decisions are made based on competent assessment rather than subjective impressions; Parents with mental illness are more likely to be poor, which certainly magnifies other issues, undermines stability, and also creates "basic needs" concerns Much of the literature and consensus regarding parents with mental illness tends to focus on the negative impact; however, research (however limited) does indicate that (for example) parents with chronic mental illness who are also parents caring for children tend to function better than similarly-diagnosed adults who do not have child-rearing responsibilities; To the extent strength are identified, these tend to be separate from the fact of the mental illness; but is it possible that parents with mental illness who receive quality professional services and have good support may have assets directly related to their illness? (e.g. knowledge of navigating systems; empathy and awareness regarding mental health issues). The concern is this: child welfare services (i.e. preservation and reunification services) tend to be child-focused. Further, policy and law general establish that long-term intensive services are not required, and probably not desirable, in order to assure safety and permanency for children. On the other hand, adults with chronic mental illness are likely to require some level of long-term services anyway, so why not incorporate their parenting role into those services? But what is the best way to link parent-centered and child-centered services, including defining relationships (e.g. parent's case manager and child's caseworker)? I have been reviewing legal appeals cases and have noticed that in cases involving parents with intellectual disabilities, agencies have in a number of cases gone to great efforts over a long period of time to provide supports and services to families. The same degree of interest and effort does not appear in cases involving parents with mental illnesses (I have not run into any cases so far involving specific physical disabilities among those available to me). Any information on research (preferably accessible to non-professionals) and model programs would be much appreciated. Sheri McMahon ND

Hi Sheri I know in some of my qualitative interviews on a study that I did recently in my county, that I heard that Judges could be a key group in that they can point out that someone can’t be “punished” for having a mental illness. Several caseworkers talked of how judges were effective in reminding caseworkers, DA’s and extended families that people with mental illness still have civil rights and that prevention and supporting parents was also important. It led me to wonder if anyone has done a special mental health court for parents involved in Child welfare system? I do agree that we seem to have better preventative programs for families with developmental disabilities. One place that may have some research on effective programs for parents with a diagnosed mental illness/ child welfare involvement is the early head start literature. This seems to be something that they have been talking about, at least locally in my county. Mary E Rauktis Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor The University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work Child Welfare Education and Research Program office 412.648.1225 personal 412 716 9061 fax 412.624.1159 mar104pitt.edu www.socialwork.pitt.edu From: bounce-7488902-14235796list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-7488902-14235796list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of D F MCMAHON Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2010 7:56 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: parents with mental illness As an advisory council member for a 6-county human services system (within state government) I am interested in promoting services geared towards parents with mental illness who are involved with the child welfare system. Some obvious points: Parents with diagnosed mental illness are more likely than other parents to become involved with the child welfare system and to lose custody of their children; Parents may be subject to vague allegations of "unresolved mental health issues" by child welfare professionals and lack adequate resources to ensure that decisions are made based on competent assessment rather than subjective impressions; Parents with mental illness are more likely to be poor, which certainly magnifies other issues, undermines stability, and also creates "basic needs" concerns Much of the literature and consensus regarding parents with mental illness tends to focus on the negative impact; however, research (however limited) does indicate that (for example) parents with chronic mental illness who are also parents caring for children tend to function better than similarly-diagnosed adults who do not have child-rearing responsibilities; To the extent strength are identified, these tend to be separate from the fact of the mental illness; but is it possible that parents with mental illness who receive quality professional services and have good support may have assets directly related to their illness? (e.g. knowledge of navigating systems; empathy and awareness regarding mental health issues). The concern is this: child welfare services (i.e. preservation and reunification services) tend to be child-focused. Further, policy and law general establish that long-term intensive services are not required, and probably not desirable, in order to assure safety and permanency for children. On the other hand, adults with chronic mental illness are likely to require some level of long-term services anyway, so why not incorporate their parenting role into those services? But what is the best way to link parent-centered and child-centered services, including defining relationships (e.g. parent's case manager and child's caseworker)? I have been reviewing legal appeals cases and have noticed that in cases involving parents with intellectual disabilities, agencies have in a number of cases gone to great efforts over a long period of time to provide supports and services to families. The same degree of interest and effort does not appear in cases involving parents with mental illnesses (I have not run into any cases so far involving specific physical disabilities among those available to me). Any information on research (preferably accessible to non-professionals) and model programs would be much appreciated. Sheri McMahon ND