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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8702
Date: 2010-12-02

Author:Joan Crowley

Subject:Re: legislation

I would urge you not to limit the requirements to sexual abuse. We seem to have sexual abuse on the brain, to the exclusion of other forms of maltreatment. Sexual abuse is bad, but neglect is often worse, and by omitting the full range of abusive acts or failures to act I think we are downplaying the significance of abuse in general. We also need to educate about domestic abuse--the many forms of coercive control. Just focusing on sexual abuse seems to me to be a wasted opportunity. Jody Crowley Department of Criminal Justice New Mexico State University On Nov 29, 2010, at 11:32 AM, Allison West wrote: Good afternoon, I am serving as part of a workgroup exploring the feasibility of state legislation that would introduce certain content requirements for educating faculty, parents, and students in public schools on the topic of child sexual abuse awareness and prevention. Currently in our state efforts at education focus primarily on identification and reporting for school faculty, and individual schools and teachers are on their own to interpret and implement "personal safety" instruction for students, which varies widely in quality. We are interested in advocating for a more trauma-informed approach that would engage the school community in the intervention and prevention of sexual victimization. I am aware that Vermont recently passed similar legislation but am wondering if anyone knows of other states that have attempted or passed similar legislation, and, if so, does there exist any evaluation data that would support such legislation in other states? Thanks for any and all information that may help guide this process. Regards, Allison West, L.C.S.W.-C. Director of Child Abuse Prevention St. Vincent's Villa Catholic Charities of Baltimore 410-252-4000 ext. 1602 www.childsafeeducation.org www.illuminationsprogram.org Spread the word about our free online training program located at www.childsafeeducation.org ! This message is confidential, intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is privileged or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are notified that the dissemination, distribution or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you receive this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), please notify the sender at the e-mail address or by telephone, and delete this e-mail from your computer. Thank you.

I would urge you not to limit the requirements to sexual abuse. We seem to have sexual abuse on the brain, to the exclusion of other forms of maltreatment. Sexual abuse is bad, but neglect is often worse, and by omitting the full range of abusive acts or failures to act I think we are downplaying the significance of abuse in general. We also need to educate about domestic abuse--the many forms of coercive control. Just focusing on sexual abuse seems to me to be a wasted opportunity. Jody Crowley Department of Criminal Justice New Mexico State University On Nov 29, 2010, at 11:32 AM, Allison West wrote: Good afternoon, I am serving as part of a workgroup exploring the feasibility of state legislation that would introduce certain content requirements for educating faculty, parents, and students in public schools on the topic of child sexual abuse awareness and prevention. Currently in our state efforts at education focus primarily on identification and reporting for school faculty, and individual schools and teachers are on their own to interpret and implement "personal safety" instruction for students, which varies widely in quality. We are interested in advocating for a more trauma-informed approach that would engage the school community in the intervention and prevention of sexual victimization. I am aware that Vermont recently passed similar legislation but am wondering if anyone knows of other states that have attempted or passed similar legislation, and, if so, does there exist any evaluation data that would support such legislation in other states? Thanks for any and all information that may help guide this process. Regards, Allison West, L.C.S.W.-C. Director of Child Abuse Prevention St. Vincent's Villa Catholic Charities of Baltimore 410-252-4000 ext. 1602 www.childsafeeducation.org www.illuminationsprogram.org Spread the word about our free online training program located at www.childsafeeducation.org ! This message is confidential, intended only for the named recipient(s) and may contain information that is privileged or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are notified that the dissemination, distribution or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you receive this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), please notify the sender at the e-mail address or by telephone, and delete this e-mail from your computer. Thank you.