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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8641
Date: 2010-09-30

Author:Felicia Freeman

Subject:RE: REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying

What bullying research doesn’t explore, but needs to are the adult behaviors toward children that result in child bullying incidents. School personnel and school volunteers have been observed bullying children under the guise of adult supervision, rule enforcement, and ‘teaching appropriate social skills”. Grabbing a child’s arm roughly and shaking it until the child’s entire body shakes along with it, grabbing shoulders and forcing children to sit, and saying words in harsh tones and with a threatening inflection and making children cry is not adult supervision. It is plain and simple child abuse. Let’s look into that a little more, shall we. Every school has at least a couple bullies that ruin school experience for multiple children, and give educators a bad name and leave a bad taste in the mouth of those children who will one day grow up to either support or create conflict with the educational system. Felicia I. Freeman, President Children First 4708 Dogwood Drive, Everett, WA 98203 P.O. Box 2629, Everett, WA 98213-2629 (425) 259-0146 (425) 293-0333 direct (425) 346-8414 cell www.deaconesschildren.org Transforming lives of children in the Pacific North West by breaking the cycle of Child Abuse and Neglect. Deaconess Children’s Services is a champion of hope and opportunity for children and their families, especially those in greatest need, empowering them to BELIEVE in a life full of possibilities. ________________________________ From: bounce-6375441-13481403@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6375441-13481403@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Anthony Petrosino Sent: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:04 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying Dear Colleagues Some on the list may wish to learn of the report below. Best wishes Anthony > > > ----- Forwarded Message ----- > From: "IES Newsflash Subscription Service" > To: apetros@wested.org > Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2010 11:04:18 AM > Subject: REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying > > Institute of Education Sciences - Newsflash > REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying > > Bullying appears to be frequent among U.S. students and has been > associated with several short- and long-term negative consequences such > as depression and poor health. But research suggests that many bullying > incidents are not reported to school officials, which hampers educators’ > ability to define the scope and frequency of bullying behavior in their > schools and is often the first step in addressing the problem. > > REL Northeast’s study, What characteristics of bullying, bullying > victims, and schools are associated with increased reporting of bullying > to school officials? tested 51 characteristics of bullying > victimization, bullying victims, and bullying victims’ schools to > determine which were associated with either increased or decreased > reporting to school officials. It found that 10 characteristics were > associated with increased reporting, and 1 characteristic was associated > with decreased reporting. > > Specifically: > > • Students who were bullied were more likely to indicate that their > victimization was reported to a school official if the bullying involved > injury, physical threats, destruction of property, actual physical > contact (pushing, shoving, and the like), greater frequency, multiple > types, more than one location, and at least one occurrence on a school > bus. > > • Two types of bullying victims were more likely to indicate that their > victimization was reported to school officials—those involved in a fight > during the school year and those who reported being afraid of attack and > avoiding certain school areas or activities. > > • Higher grade levels are associated with less reporting: reporting > ranged from 53 percent in grade 6 to 27 percent in grade 12. > > • No characteristic of bullying victims’ schools—including general > characteristics, school culture, and school security and safety—was > associated with either increased or decreased reporting. > > For more information, see the report at > http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=239 > > > > > ...connecting research, policy and practice > > > You have received this message because you subscribed to a newsflash > service through IES or one of its centers. > Change your options or unsubscribe from this service . > > By visiting Newsflash you may also sign up to receive information from > IES and its four Centers NCES , NCER , NCEE , & NCSER to stay abreast of > all activities within the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). > > To obtain hard copy of many IES products as well as hard copy and > electronic versions of hundreds of other U.S. Department of Education > products please visit http://www.edpubs.org or call 1-877-433-7827 > (877-4-EDPUBS).

What bullying research doesn’t explore, but needs to are the adult behaviors toward children that result in child bullying incidents. School personnel and school volunteers have been observed bullying children under the guise of adult supervision, rule enforcement, and ‘teaching appropriate social skills”. Grabbing a child’s arm roughly and shaking it until the child’s entire body shakes along with it, grabbing shoulders and forcing children to sit, and saying words in harsh tones and with a threatening inflection and making children cry is not adult supervision. It is plain and simple child abuse. Let’s look into that a little more, shall we. Every school has at least a couple bullies that ruin school experience for multiple children, and give educators a bad name and leave a bad taste in the mouth of those children who will one day grow up to either support or create conflict with the educational system. Felicia I. Freeman, President Children First 4708 Dogwood Drive, Everett, WA 98203 P.O. Box 2629, Everett, WA 98213-2629 (425) 259-0146 (425) 293-0333 direct (425) 346-8414 cell www.deaconesschildren.org Transforming lives of children in the Pacific North West by breaking the cycle of Child Abuse and Neglect. Deaconess Children’s Services is a champion of hope and opportunity for children and their families, especially those in greatest need, empowering them to BELIEVE in a life full of possibilities. ________________________________ From: bounce-6375441-13481403list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6375441-13481403list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Anthony Petrosino Sent: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 7:04 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying Dear Colleagues Some on the list may wish to learn of the report below. Best wishes Anthony > > > ----- Forwarded Message ----- > From: "IES Newsflash Subscription Service" > To: apetroswested.org > Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2010 11:04:18 AM > Subject: REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying > > Institute of Education Sciences - Newsflash > REL Northeast Releases New Study on School Related Bullying > > Bullying appears to be frequent among U.S. students and has been > associated with several short- and long-term negative consequences such > as depression and poor health. But research suggests that many bullying > incidents are not reported to school officials, which hampers educators’ > ability to define the scope and frequency of bullying behavior in their > schools and is often the first step in addressing the problem. > > REL Northeast’s study, What characteristics of bullying, bullying > victims, and schools are associated with increased reporting of bullying > to school officials? tested 51 characteristics of bullying > victimization, bullying victims, and bullying victims’ schools to > determine which were associated with either increased or decreased > reporting to school officials. It found that 10 characteristics were > associated with increased reporting, and 1 characteristic was associated > with decreased reporting. > > Specifically: > > • Students who were bullied were more likely to indicate that their > victimization was reported to a school official if the bullying involved > injury, physical threats, destruction of property, actual physical > contact (pushing, shoving, and the like), greater frequency, multiple > types, more than one location, and at least one occurrence on a school > bus. > > • Two types of bullying victims were more likely to indicate that their > victimization was reported to school officials—those involved in a fight > during the school year and those who reported being afraid of attack and > avoiding certain school areas or activities. > > • Higher grade levels are associated with less reporting: reporting > ranged from 53 percent in grade 6 to 27 percent in grade 12. > > • No characteristic of bullying victims’ schools—including general > characteristics, school culture, and school security and safety—was > associated with either increased or decreased reporting. > > For more information, see the report at > http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=239 > > > > > ...connecting research, policy and practice > > > You have received this message because you subscribed to a newsflash > service through IES or one of its centers. > Change your options or unsubscribe from this service . > > By visiting Newsflash you may also sign up to receive information from > IES and its four Centers NCES , NCER , NCEE , & NCSER to stay abreast of > all activities within the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). > > To obtain hard copy of many IES products as well as hard copy and > electronic versions of hundreds of other U.S. Department of Education > products please visit http://www.edpubs.org or call 1-877-433-7827 > (877-4-EDPUBS).