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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8637
Date: 2012-07-27

Author:Andrea Sedlak

Subject:RE: childhood emotional/psychological maltreatment

Since the late 1970’s, the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect has classified emotional maltreatment as emotional abuse and emotional neglect. Over the various cycles of the project (4 now) the subcodes in these main categories have been refined and now there are 8 emotional abuse subcodes and 11 emotional neglect subcodes. Most would probably agree that these go beyond what they would call “psychological” maltreatment. Some may prefer no calling these “emotional” maltreatment and instead classify them elsewhere, but the subcode lists do illustrate the complexity of maltreatment and the challenges of classifying/labeling types and subtypes. Emotional abuse: Close confinement: tying/binding Close confinement: other Verbal assaults and emotional abuse Threats of sexual abuse (without contact) Threats of other maltreatment Terrorizing the child Administering unprescribed substances Other abuse Emotional neglect: Inadequate nurturance/affection Exposure to domestic violence Knowingly permitting drug/alcohol abuse Knowingly permitting other maladaptive behavior Refusal to allow or provide needed care for diagnosed emotional or behavioral impairment/problem Failure to seek needed care for emotional or behavioral impairment/problem Overprotectiveness Inadequate structure Inappropriately advanced expectations Exposure to maladaptive behaviors and environments Other inattention to development/emotional needs The detailed definitions for each of these subcodes are available in the NIS-4 Analysis Report (currently available with the dataset from the Cornell archive). ______________________________________________ Andrea J. Sedlak, Ph.D. Vice President Westat, Inc. 1600 Research Blvd. RW2520 Rockville, MD 20850 (301) 251-4211 fax: (301) 315-5934 andreasedlak@westat.com Andrea From: bounce-62715249-12198602@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-62715249-12198602@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Hurst, Tamara Sent: Monday, July 23, 2012 5:23 PM To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-L@cornell.edu Subject: childhood emotional/psychological maltreatment I am seeking input as to whether the constructs of childhood emotional maltreatment and childhood psychological maltreatment are interchangeable or if they have distinct operational definitions. Most literature utilizes one term or the other without distinction, including position papers by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Prevent Child Abuse America. It seems only a few researchers (i.e. Hart & Karlson, 1996) have taken a stand as to which construct and definition is more accurate and preferable. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Tamara Hurst, LCSW Doctoral Candidate, The University of Georgia Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being hurst28@uga.edu

Since the late 1970’s, the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect has classified emotional maltreatment as emotional abuse and emotional neglect. Over the various cycles of the project (4 now) the subcodes in these main categories have been refined and now there are 8 emotional abuse subcodes and 11 emotional neglect subcodes. Most would probably agree that these go beyond what they would call “psychological” maltreatment. Some may prefer no calling these “emotional” maltreatment and instead classify them elsewhere, but the subcode lists do illustrate the complexity of maltreatment and the challenges of classifying/labeling types and subtypes. Emotional abuse: Close confinement: tying/binding Close confinement: other Verbal assaults and emotional abuse Threats of sexual abuse (without contact) Threats of other maltreatment Terrorizing the child Administering unprescribed substances Other abuse Emotional neglect: Inadequate nurturance/affection Exposure to domestic violence Knowingly permitting drug/alcohol abuse Knowingly permitting other maladaptive behavior Refusal to allow or provide needed care for diagnosed emotional or behavioral impairment/problem Failure to seek needed care for emotional or behavioral impairment/problem Overprotectiveness Inadequate structure Inappropriately advanced expectations Exposure to maladaptive behaviors and environments Other inattention to development/emotional needs The detailed definitions for each of these subcodes are available in the NIS-4 Analysis Report (currently available with the dataset from the Cornell archive). ______________________________________________ Andrea J. Sedlak, Ph.D. Vice President Westat, Inc. 1600 Research Blvd. RW2520 Rockville, MD 20850 (301) 251-4211 fax: (301) 315-5934 andreasedlakwestat.com Andrea From: bounce-62715249-12198602list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-62715249-12198602list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Hurst, Tamara Sent: Monday, July 23, 2012 5:23 PM To: Child-Maltreatment-Research-Lcornell.edu Subject: childhood emotional/psychological maltreatment I am seeking input as to whether the constructs of childhood emotional maltreatment and childhood psychological maltreatment are interchangeable or if they have distinct operational definitions. Most literature utilizes one term or the other without distinction, including position papers by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Prevent Child Abuse America. It seems only a few researchers (i.e. Hart & Karlson, 1996) have taken a stand as to which construct and definition is more accurate and preferable. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Tamara Hurst, LCSW Doctoral Candidate, The University of Georgia Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being hurst28uga.edu