Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - September 14, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8619
Date: 2010-09-01

Author:Leslie Shear

Subject:Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008

Watching this discussion, several hypotheses occur to me: 1. Budget cuts result in smaller staff, and less data collection; 2. The increase in the amount of media attention to sex offenses, sex offender laws and the sex abuse cases involving clergy may have had an impact on behavior -- incest and molestation are no longer tacitly condoned. Kids also are are more sophisticated at a younger age about this stuff, and may be better able to protect themselves. Leslie Ellen Shear, CFLS, CALS* and IAML** Attorney at Law California State Bar No. 72623 16133 Ventura Boulevard, Seventh Floor Encino, CA 91436-2403 Phone: 818 501-3691 Fax: 818 501-3692 Email: custodymatters@earthlink.net lescfls@earthlink.net lescfls@mac.com Web: www.custodymatters.com www.californiafamilylawappeals.com *Certified as a Specialist in Family Law (1983) and a Specialist in Appellate Law (2009) by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. ** Fellow, International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers On Aug 31, 2010, at 12:13 PM, Poha Kane wrote: Dr. Finkelhor, I have to wonder how we should address the point this member poster brought up: Quote: Dear members, The thought occurred to me as I was following the discussion about the trends in this report that the data reported is from 2008 and the economic downturn started in the fall of 2008 and became more severe and prolonged in 2009 with little recovery in 2010. Perhaps the expected increase in reported maltreatment will come in the next years' reports. As a family's situation becomes more desperate-no new job, limited funds consumed, house in foreclosure, etc., the strain within the family increasing with a greater chance of abuse/maltreatment. Just a thought. Phyllis K. Marion, DNSc, CPNP pkm15@columbia.edu End Quote I believe the claim above covers both the fact that we were still in an economic boom, though it was fading, and families really couldn't have started feeling the effects personally that would have impacted the incidences of CAN, if I understood Dr. Marion correctly. If this is true then families would not be in those dire straights until at least the end of 2009. Not only would the data be from 2008 but the fiscal reporting year would end on July 1, usually. I will be very interested in seeing the data from 2008-2009 when it has been published. I will also add the same thing I've said in a couple of posts previously - that we really have no excuse for not both post logging and calculating past years and keeping them available for researchers, both social and political, and we could certainly have access now to data even as it is reported and pre-hard copy publishing. I understand any researcher's reluctance to have raw figures available publically but given the capacity in these times of advance spreadsheet database technology for analysis we could actually have a running output limited only by the speed with which we can input the raw numbers. We are still about a year and a half behind the submission of data reports from the field and when we publish. This has been so for two decades to my knowledge and likely much longer. Poha Kane On 8/31/10, Finkelhor, David wrote: A number of the posts in response to this thread about declines in child maltreatment substantiations have offered explanations that have to do with changed CPS standards or procedures or constrained resources or staffing or new professional reticence. While such explanations may explain some portion of the decline, they do not account well for some of the evidence from various studies that we have about the period from 1993 through 2005-6. The NIS study which found substantial declines in cases of maltreatment that were known to professionals in the community, whether or not they passed them on to CPS The several youth self-report surveys that show declines in sexual abuse and physical assault that the youth themselves say they have experienced. The fact that the largest declines in CPS substantiations have been for sexual abuse, a form of abuse which is generally taken more seriously. Changes in standards, resource constraints and willingness to report would be likely to most affect the less serious and more ambiguous forms of maltreatment like neglect, which in fact has declined the least. Two studies, one that we did, and one conducted by folks at the Harvard School of Public Health, looked at state CPS data for indications that resource constraints or changed standards were affecting the rates and were unable to find such evidence. The possibility that there are administrative changes that may affect the NCANDS numbers is important to investigate, but as a full explanation for the decline, it is not doing a good job of accounting for the accumulating evidence. David Finkelhor Crimes against Children Research Center Family Research Laboratory Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 email: david.finkelhor@unh.edu My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order. http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ http://www.unh.edu/frl/ -----Original Message----- From: bounce-6222013-6832158@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6222013-6832158@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Larry Breitenstein Sent: 2010-08-27 15:45 To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 In research I have yet to publish, I compared Pennsylvania counties operating under a Medicaid managed care model to similar sized counties outside of the Medicaid managed care model and found a significant decline in some types of reported abuse (bruises and contusions) and indicated findings of abuse. My thought was since managed care (and health care policy) is directing kids away from hospitals (changing the front door for who sees the child first), those treating the kids (and those kids not receiving medical treatment) are being excluded from what in the past would have been reported. Pennsylvania law requires a medical finding to substantiate most reports. Thus these systemic changes could be making it too hard for CPW to get all that is needed to substantiate a finding of abuse. These changes with health care could be indirectly forcing CPS workers to focus more on the most serious cases and/or preventing them from using what is available. My findings suggested managed care had no affect on serious injuries like fractures.

Watching this discussion, several hypotheses occur to me: 1. Budget cuts result in smaller staff, and less data collection; 2. The increase in the amount of media attention to sex offenses, sex offender laws and the sex abuse cases involving clergy may have had an impact on behavior -- incest and molestation are no longer tacitly condoned. Kids also are are more sophisticated at a younger age about this stuff, and may be better able to protect themselves. Leslie Ellen Shear, CFLS, CALS* and IAML** Attorney at Law California State Bar No. 72623 16133 Ventura Boulevard, Seventh Floor Encino, CA 91436-2403 Phone: 818 501-3691 Fax: 818 501-3692 Email: custodymattersearthlink.net lescflsearthlink.net lescflsmac.com Web: www.custodymatters.com www.californiafamilylawappeals.com *Certified as a Specialist in Family Law (1983) and a Specialist in Appellate Law (2009) by the State Bar of California, Board of Legal Specialization. ** Fellow, International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers On Aug 31, 2010, at 12:13 PM, Poha Kane wrote: Dr. Finkelhor, I have to wonder how we should address the point this member poster brought up: Quote: Dear members, The thought occurred to me as I was following the discussion about the trends in this report that the data reported is from 2008 and the economic downturn started in the fall of 2008 and became more severe and prolonged in 2009 with little recovery in 2010. Perhaps the expected increase in reported maltreatment will come in the next years' reports. As a family's situation becomes more desperate-no new job, limited funds consumed, house in foreclosure, etc., the strain within the family increasing with a greater chance of abuse/maltreatment. Just a thought. Phyllis K. Marion, DNSc, CPNP pkm15columbia.edu End Quote I believe the claim above covers both the fact that we were still in an economic boom, though it was fading, and families really couldn't have started feeling the effects personally that would have impacted the incidences of CAN, if I understood Dr. Marion correctly. If this is true then families would not be in those dire straights until at least the end of 2009. Not only would the data be from 2008 but the fiscal reporting year would end on July 1, usually. I will be very interested in seeing the data from 2008-2009 when it has been published. I will also add the same thing I've said in a couple of posts previously - that we really have no excuse for not both post logging and calculating past years and keeping them available for researchers, both social and political, and we could certainly have access now to data even as it is reported and pre-hard copy publishing. I understand any researcher's reluctance to have raw figures available publically but given the capacity in these times of advance spreadsheet database technology for analysis we could actually have a running output limited only by the speed with which we can input the raw numbers. We are still about a year and a half behind the submission of data reports from the field and when we publish. This has been so for two decades to my knowledge and likely much longer. Poha Kane On 8/31/10, Finkelhor, David wrote: A number of the posts in response to this thread about declines in child maltreatment substantiations have offered explanations that have to do with changed CPS standards or procedures or constrained resources or staffing or new professional reticence. While such explanations may explain some portion of the decline, they do not account well for some of the evidence from various studies that we have about the period from 1993 through 2005-6. The NIS study which found substantial declines in cases of maltreatment that were known to professionals in the community, whether or not they passed them on to CPS The several youth self-report surveys that show declines in sexual abuse and physical assault that the youth themselves say they have experienced. The fact that the largest declines in CPS substantiations have been for sexual abuse, a form of abuse which is generally taken more seriously. Changes in standards, resource constraints and willingness to report would be likely to most affect the less serious and more ambiguous forms of maltreatment like neglect, which in fact has declined the least. Two studies, one that we did, and one conducted by folks at the Harvard School of Public Health, looked at state CPS data for indications that resource constraints or changed standards were affecting the rates and were unable to find such evidence. The possibility that there are administrative changes that may affect the NCANDS numbers is important to investigate, but as a full explanation for the decline, it is not doing a good job of accounting for the accumulating evidence. David Finkelhor Crimes against Children Research Center Family Research Laboratory Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 email: david.finkelhorunh.edu My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order. http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ http://www.unh.edu/frl/ -----Original Message----- From: bounce-6222013-6832158list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6222013-6832158list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Larry Breitenstein Sent: 2010-08-27 15:45 To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 In research I have yet to publish, I compared Pennsylvania counties operating under a Medicaid managed care model to similar sized counties outside of the Medicaid managed care model and found a significant decline in some types of reported abuse (bruises and contusions) and indicated findings of abuse. My thought was since managed care (and health care policy) is directing kids away from hospitals (changing the front door for who sees the child first), those treating the kids (and those kids not receiving medical treatment) are being excluded from what in the past would have been reported. Pennsylvania law requires a medical finding to substantiate most reports. Thus these systemic changes could be making it too hard for CPW to get all that is needed to substantiate a finding of abuse. These changes with health care could be indirectly forcing CPS workers to focus more on the most serious cases and/or preventing them from using what is available. My findings suggested managed care had no affect on serious injuries like fractures.