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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8600
Date: 2010-08-28

Author:Randi Rubenstein

Subject:RE: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008

It seems to me what we are lacking are goals and benchmarks. Without them, we are more concerned with the direction of change, rather than the magnitude change towards whatever we deem to be “healthier” levels. While we desire a society free from any child maltreatment, that is unrealistic and so we need a better sense of what is achievable. Goal setting has been done in other areas related to child wellbeing -- for example, teen birth rates. The US has been working diligently to reduce teen birth rates, and we have achieved an amazing 30% decrease in birth rates since 1990. We might be satisfied with that and settle into complacency. However, when we compare US rates with similar modern and healthy nations, it is apparent that US rates are far from optimal compared with peer nations – five to nine times higher than most! http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/TBR_InternationalComparison.pdf This disparity tells us that much lower rates are achievable, and we have much more work to do to achieve levels that reflect societies with healthier conditions for children and families. What are the goals and benchmarks for US rates of child maltreatment? What is achievable in a well-educated nation that cherishes its children? Randi Randi S. Rubenstein Executive Director Education for Successful Parenting (ESP) www.eduparents.org (949) 646-6016

It seems to me what we are lacking are goals and benchmarks. Without them, we are more concerned with the direction of change, rather than the magnitude change towards whatever we deem to be “healthier” levels. While we desire a society free from any child maltreatment, that is unrealistic and so we need a better sense of what is achievable. Goal setting has been done in other areas related to child wellbeing -- for example, teen birth rates. The US has been working diligently to reduce teen birth rates, and we have achieved an amazing 30% decrease in birth rates since 1990. We might be satisfied with that and settle into complacency. However, when we compare US rates with similar modern and healthy nations, it is apparent that US rates are far from optimal compared with peer nations – five to nine times higher than most! http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/TBR_InternationalComparison.pdf This disparity tells us that much lower rates are achievable, and we have much more work to do to achieve levels that reflect societies with healthier conditions for children and families. What are the goals and benchmarks for US rates of child maltreatment? What is achievable in a well-educated nation that cherishes its children? Randi Randi S. Rubenstein Executive Director Education for Successful Parenting (ESP) www.eduparents.org (949) 646-6016