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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Message ID: 8594
Date: 2010-08-27

Author:Stone, Deborah (CDC/CCEHIP/NCIPC)

Subject:RE: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008

According to an article by Yuan (2005) in "Protecting Children" (vol 20, No. 2 &3, p. 22), the decision to use alternative response or differential response is only made after a report to CPS has been made. This wouldn't then impact the number of reports to CPS, but would impact the number of reports substantiated (assuming that at least some of the AR cases would have previously been substantiated). Deb -----Original Message----- From: bounce-6220148-13419240@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6220148-13419240@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kristen Shook Slack Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2010 3:53 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 What is so interesting to me is that even the numbers/rates of /reports/ to CPS hotlines has been declining (in many, but not all locales), despite the bad economy. I would expect fewer screened in reports and substantiated reports because as already noted, those are gatekeeping decisions, and with state/county budgets in crisis, there may be fewer resources to deal with even steady demand on systems. However, I would have expected that people would still make calls to CPS when they expect maltreatment is occurring. Others have hypothesized that there may be fewer mandated (social service) reporters with all the hiring freezes, layoffs, etc. It could also be that there is a greater reluctance, on the part of potential reporters, to make calls that involve situations where the neglect/poverty line is blurry (e.g., with more people struggling with unemployment, housing loss, etc., there may be a greater tendency to empathize with another family's situation). There may be a more mechanical explanation, though--one that I thought had been raised on this listserv by others. Are states that have differential/alternative response in place counting their lower risk, voluntary "tracks" as protective services reports or are these reports getting subtracted from the denominator in their report rate and victimization rate calculations? If the latter is true, with more and more states and localities adopting such reforms, we might expect to see these declines in recent years. -Kristi -- Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of Social Work University of Wisconsin-Madison 1350 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 ph: 608-263-3671 fx: 608-263-3836

According to an article by Yuan (2005) in "Protecting Children" (vol 20, No. 2 &3, p. 22), the decision to use alternative response or differential response is only made after a report to CPS has been made. This wouldn't then impact the number of reports to CPS, but would impact the number of reports substantiated (assuming that at least some of the AR cases would have previously been substantiated). Deb -----Original Message----- From: bounce-6220148-13419240list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-6220148-13419240list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kristen Shook Slack Sent: Thursday, August 26, 2010 3:53 PM To: Child Maltreatment Researchers Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 What is so interesting to me is that even the numbers/rates of /reports/ to CPS hotlines has been declining (in many, but not all locales), despite the bad economy. I would expect fewer screened in reports and substantiated reports because as already noted, those are gatekeeping decisions, and with state/county budgets in crisis, there may be fewer resources to deal with even steady demand on systems. However, I would have expected that people would still make calls to CPS when they expect maltreatment is occurring. Others have hypothesized that there may be fewer mandated (social service) reporters with all the hiring freezes, layoffs, etc. It could also be that there is a greater reluctance, on the part of potential reporters, to make calls that involve situations where the neglect/poverty line is blurry (e.g., with more people struggling with unemployment, housing loss, etc., there may be a greater tendency to empathize with another family's situation). There may be a more mechanical explanation, though--one that I thought had been raised on this listserv by others. Are states that have differential/alternative response in place counting their lower risk, voluntary "tracks" as protective services reports or are these reports getting subtracted from the denominator in their report rate and victimization rate calculations? If the latter is true, with more and more states and localities adopting such reforms, we might expect to see these declines in recent years. -Kristi -- Kristen Shook Slack, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of Social Work University of Wisconsin-Madison 1350 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706 ph: 608-263-3671 fx: 608-263-3836