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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

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Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8593
Date: 2010-08-27

Author:Ben Saunders

Subject:Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008

Just to add a bit more complication to this discussion, I presented a paper at the San Diego Conference in January looking at results of lifetime sexual assault prevalence reported by teenagers assessed in the National Survey of Adolescents (N=3,907), which we conducted in 1995, and the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication (N=3,614), the first wave of which was conducted in 2005. These two surveys separated by 10 years examined two different cohorts of adolescents (ages 12-17) living in U.S. households with telephones. The samples were sampled and recruited using the same methods. Self-reported lifetime prevalence of sexual assault was assessed with the two samples using the same screening questions. So, comparison of the results of the two surveys gives us snapshots of self-reported sexual assault prevalence among teenagers in 1995 and 2005. However, it tells us nothing about the trends in the interim. Here is a summary of the findings... 1. No statistically significant differences between SA prevalence among boys (3.5% - 3.8%) or girls (13.2% - 11.5%), though the trend for girls was a decline. 2. No significant differences in SA prevalence within racial/ethnic groups, though there was a trend for decline among African Americans (13.1% - 9.8%). 3. A significant decline in SA prevalence among the 12 year old cohort (3.7% - 1.6%). No significant differences among any of the other age cohorts. 4. Average age at first sexual assault increased fro 11.8 years to 14.9 years. 5. The reporting to authorities rate for first sexual assaults doubled from 14% to 29%. These results suggest that changes in gross statistics like number of reports to CPS likely mask the more interesting underlying trends in gender, age, racial/ethnic, and other subgroups. These data indicated that declines are being seen in the younger age cohorts (0-12) and perhaps among certain ethnic groups (AA). However, other groups report similar results in 1995 and 2005. So, worrying about global trends may be less revealing than better understanding which subgroups are exhibiting which trends and then trying to understand why. Articles describing the comparison data for CSA, physical abuse, DV exposure, and community violence exposures from the 1995 NSA and 2005 NSA-R will be appearing in the literature over the next year. Several are in press now. I am happy to send a handout from the San Diego paper to anyone that wants it. Contact me back channel at saunders@musc.edu . Ben Basically, there were On 8/27/2010 9:41 AM, Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote: Re: decreases in physical and sexual abuse rates. In studies using law enforcement data, I’ve observed similar declines in child sexual abuse cases involving nonfamilial and unrelated perpetrators. These cases don’t involve CPS policies, and don’t involve family pressures to retain a breadwinner during hard times. The trajectory of the decline in these separate data sets and different kinds of reports (often non-CPS cases) over the past decade and a half parallels what was seen in the CPS report data. In my career in child abuse research, I can’t recall seeing very many research findings that seem to evoke such skepticism as research suggesting that abuse rates are declining. I firmly believe that skepticism about research findings is a good thing, but I’m intrigued about why so much skepticism about this now almost two decade long finding. As a psychologist, the really interesting research question to me is becoming the reaction of our field to this finding, more than any more examination on the finding itself! I recall recently sharing this finding with a person from a rural child advocacy center (who had never heard anything about it) and she was almost in tears with distress. Mark -- Benjamin E. Saunders, Ph.D. Professor and Associate Director National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Medical University of South Carolina 67 President Street, MSC 861 Charleston, SC 29425 843-792-2945 Phone 843-792-7146 Fax www.musc.edu/ncvc Learn about Project BEST Take our free Web-based training courses: TF-CBTWeb CPTWeb

Just to add a bit more complication to this discussion, I presented a paper at the San Diego Conference in January looking at results of lifetime sexual assault prevalence reported by teenagers assessed in the National Survey of Adolescents (N=3,907), which we conducted in 1995, and the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication (N=3,614), the first wave of which was conducted in 2005. These two surveys separated by 10 years examined two different cohorts of adolescents (ages 12-17) living in U.S. households with telephones. The samples were sampled and recruited using the same methods. Self-reported lifetime prevalence of sexual assault was assessed with the two samples using the same screening questions. So, comparison of the results of the two surveys gives us snapshots of self-reported sexual assault prevalence among teenagers in 1995 and 2005. However, it tells us nothing about the trends in the interim. Here is a summary of the findings... 1. No statistically significant differences between SA prevalence among boys (3.5% - 3.8%) or girls (13.2% - 11.5%), though the trend for girls was a decline. 2. No significant differences in SA prevalence within racial/ethnic groups, though there was a trend for decline among African Americans (13.1% - 9.8%). 3. A significant decline in SA prevalence among the 12 year old cohort (3.7% - 1.6%). No significant differences among any of the other age cohorts. 4. Average age at first sexual assault increased fro 11.8 years to 14.9 years. 5. The reporting to authorities rate for first sexual assaults doubled from 14% to 29%. These results suggest that changes in gross statistics like number of reports to CPS likely mask the more interesting underlying trends in gender, age, racial/ethnic, and other subgroups. These data indicated that declines are being seen in the younger age cohorts (0-12) and perhaps among certain ethnic groups (AA). However, other groups report similar results in 1995 and 2005. So, worrying about global trends may be less revealing than better understanding which subgroups are exhibiting which trends and then trying to understand why. Articles describing the comparison data for CSA, physical abuse, DV exposure, and community violence exposures from the 1995 NSA and 2005 NSA-R will be appearing in the literature over the next year. Several are in press now. I am happy to send a handout from the San Diego paper to anyone that wants it. Contact me back channel at saundersmusc.edu . Ben Basically, there were On 8/27/2010 9:41 AM, Chaffin, Mark J. (HSC) wrote: Re: decreases in physical and sexual abuse rates. In studies using law enforcement data, I’ve observed similar declines in child sexual abuse cases involving nonfamilial and unrelated perpetrators. These cases don’t involve CPS policies, and don’t involve family pressures to retain a breadwinner during hard times. The trajectory of the decline in these separate data sets and different kinds of reports (often non-CPS cases) over the past decade and a half parallels what was seen in the CPS report data. In my career in child abuse research, I can’t recall seeing very many research findings that seem to evoke such skepticism as research suggesting that abuse rates are declining. I firmly believe that skepticism about research findings is a good thing, but I’m intrigued about why so much skepticism about this now almost two decade long finding. As a psychologist, the really interesting research question to me is becoming the reaction of our field to this finding, more than any more examination on the finding itself! I recall recently sharing this finding with a person from a rural child advocacy center (who had never heard anything about it) and she was almost in tears with distress. Mark -- Benjamin E. Saunders, Ph.D. Professor and Associate Director National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Medical University of South Carolina 67 President Street, MSC 861 Charleston, SC 29425 843-792-2945 Phone 843-792-7146 Fax www.musc.edu/ncvc Learn about Project BEST Take our free Web-based training courses: TF-CBTWeb CPTWeb