Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Browse or Search All Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages (10,000+). The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - June 11, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8558
Date: 2015-06-03

Author:Bruce Borkosky

Subject:Re: Resources for researchers handling sensitive data

Context is everything. IOW, the story staff are told and incorporate into their minds and activities will provide the meaning to the activity. Thus, if the meaning being brought to bear is something like 'oh, these poor victims', then reading the cases will be more difficult. Create a narrative prior to beginning the work and continuing throughout. Use a multisensory approach - bring in physical exemplars of that narrative to promote the context visually, and use sound/music and smells to reinforce. BB On Tue, Jun 2, 2015 at 2:13 PM, Julie Halverson > wrote: Dear Colleagues, My staff are working on a research project which entails abstracting police report and court data on assaults and homicides. As you know, a lot of the information being abstracted about domestic and sexual violence can be difficult and traumatic to work with day in and day out. I was wondering if there are recommendations or resources that you use when or your staff are working with sensitive or emotionally trying research projects. I appreciate your help and look forward to your collective insight. Many Thanks, Julie Halverson -- Bruce G. Borkosky, Psy.D. PA 1800 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 863-386-0276 800-919-9008 Fax 813-200-8450 email: ForensicPsychologist@outlook.com forensic psych search engine: www.fl-forensic.com/search-1/ CEU Courses: http://www.zurinstitute.com/hipaa_patient_rights_course.html http://www.zurinstitute.com/informedconsent_legal_course.html This communication is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, please communicate the error immediately, and delete all copies.

Context is everything. IOW, the story staff are told and incorporate into their minds and activities will provide the meaning to the activity. Thus, if the meaning being brought to bear is something like 'oh, these poor victims', then reading the cases will be more difficult. Create a narrative prior to beginning the work and continuing throughout. Use a multisensory approach - bring in physical exemplars of that narrative to promote the context visually, and use sound/music and smells to reinforce. BB On Tue, Jun 2, 2015 at 2:13 PM, Julie Halverson > wrote: Dear Colleagues, My staff are working on a research project which entails abstracting police report and court data on assaults and homicides. As you know, a lot of the information being abstracted about domestic and sexual violence can be difficult and traumatic to work with day in and day out. I was wondering if there are recommendations or resources that you use when or your staff are working with sensitive or emotionally trying research projects. I appreciate your help and look forward to your collective insight. Many Thanks, Julie Halverson -- Bruce G. Borkosky, Psy.D. PA 1800 Lakeview Drive Sebring, FL 33870 863-386-0276 800-919-9008 Fax 813-200-8450 email: ForensicPsychologistoutlook.com forensic psych search engine: www.fl-forensic.com/search-1/ CEU Courses: http://www.zurinstitute.com/hipaa_patient_rights_course.html http://www.zurinstitute.com/informedconsent_legal_course.html This communication is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, please communicate the error immediately, and delete all copies.