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Message ID: 8547
Date: 2010-05-21

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: Educational Neglect

I just looked at that briefly and am puzzled by the racial disparities (which the study notes). For example, African American kids account for 44% of educational neglect findings but 24% of maltreatment findings. What might this mean? Proportionately less educational neglect by maltreating white parents means proportionately more other types of maltreatment--physical/sexual abuse, emotional abuse, etc--among the victim population? White parents may maltreat their children but, by golly, they will make sure they get to school? On the assumption that abuse and neglect in general would impact school attendance relatively equally (e.g. chemically dependent white parent would be just as likely to not get kids to school as chemically dependent minority parent) schools (cited as the primary source of educational neglect reporting) are more likely to report educational neglect by minority parents than white parents? (Musing about the possibility that "maltreated" minority kids are much more likely to want to be at home with their families vs in school, compared to "maltreated" white kids) Or, given that minority kids constitute a disproportionately larger part of the maltreatment victim population, could disproportionately large reporting of educational neglect explain that disproportion? --if so, maybe more likely for African-American children. Awhile since I have seen the breakdown for Minnesota but aware that it is one of the states where Native American children have a highly disparate representation in child welfare population (which is not really the case in, say, SW states such as NM, AZ and about which I have a personal theory). The study also discusses historical development of child protection and truancy statutes in Minnesota, in particular the shift over time from viewing truancy as the child's pathology to viewing it as also possibly due to other factors--"i.e." family/parent. Of course, no reference to environmental factors such as the school environment as a factor. (Bewildering to me why that factor is so consistently left out of these discussions!) Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ Subject: RE: Educational Neglect Date: Thu, 20 May 2010 08:53:05 -0700 From: Susan.Wells@ubc.ca To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu The CASCW at the University of Minnesota has done some work in this area. Child Protection and Educational Neglect: A Preliminary Study Tim Zuel and Anita Larson, June 2006 Susan J. Wells Professor, Joint Appointment Psychology and Social Work University of British Columbia Okanagan Arts 333 3333 University Way Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 Canada phone: 250-807-8163 fax: 250-807-8439 From: bounce-5843087-12990613@list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-5843087-12990613@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of AJack10970@aol.com Sent: May 19, 2010 9:02 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu Subject: Educational Neglect I have been away from the research field in recent years and would so appreciate a guide to the mast recent literature on educational neglect. amjackson

I just looked at that briefly and am puzzled by the racial disparities (which the study notes). For example, African American kids account for 44% of educational neglect findings but 24% of maltreatment findings. What might this mean? Proportionately less educational neglect by maltreating white parents means proportionately more other types of maltreatment--physical/sexual abuse, emotional abuse, etc--among the victim population? White parents may maltreat their children but, by golly, they will make sure they get to school? On the assumption that abuse and neglect in general would impact school attendance relatively equally (e.g. chemically dependent white parent would be just as likely to not get kids to school as chemically dependent minority parent) schools (cited as the primary source of educational neglect reporting) are more likely to report educational neglect by minority parents than white parents? (Musing about the possibility that "maltreated" minority kids are much more likely to want to be at home with their families vs in school, compared to "maltreated" white kids) Or, given that minority kids constitute a disproportionately larger part of the maltreatment victim population, could disproportionately large reporting of educational neglect explain that disproportion? --if so, maybe more likely for African-American children. Awhile since I have seen the breakdown for Minnesota but aware that it is one of the states where Native American children have a highly disparate representation in child welfare population (which is not really the case in, say, SW states such as NM, AZ and about which I have a personal theory). The study also discusses historical development of child protection and truancy statutes in Minnesota, in particular the shift over time from viewing truancy as the child's pathology to viewing it as also possibly due to other factors--"i.e." family/parent. Of course, no reference to environmental factors such as the school environment as a factor. (Bewildering to me why that factor is so consistently left out of these discussions!) Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ Subject: RE: Educational Neglect Date: Thu, 20 May 2010 08:53:05 -0700 From: Susan.Wellsubc.ca To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu The CASCW at the University of Minnesota has done some work in this area. Child Protection and Educational Neglect: A Preliminary Study Tim Zuel and Anita Larson, June 2006 Susan J. Wells Professor, Joint Appointment Psychology and Social Work University of British Columbia Okanagan Arts 333 3333 University Way Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 Canada phone: 250-807-8163 fax: 250-807-8439 From: bounce-5843087-12990613list.cornell.edu [mailto:bounce-5843087-12990613list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of AJack10970aol.com Sent: May 19, 2010 9:02 AM To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu Subject: Educational Neglect I have been away from the research field in recent years and would so appreciate a guide to the mast recent literature on educational neglect. amjackson