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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - December 22, 2017 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8539
Date: 2010-05-20

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: when to call the D.A. about suspected maltreatment

In North Dakota, a "services required" finding (same as "substantiated" in other states) means the agency must make a report "to the court."It goes to the juvenile supervisor (who is an officer of the court, may be an attorney but is not a prosecutor and does not have to be a lawyer). Statute and administrative rules say only a report must be made. Agency written policy (which does not have the force of statute but is the state agency's written manual) interprets the report requirement to mean the agency is seeking some kind of legal action. CPS investigation policy divides reports into 3 classes. The first and most serious class requires immediate notification of law enforcement, and any police report related to alleged criminal action would of course be sent to the prosecutor (state's attorney, called district attorney or county attorney in some jurisdictions). Sheri McMahon ND > From: lfontes@rcn.com > Subject: when to call the D.A. about suspected maltreatment > To: child-maltreatment-research-l@cornell.edu > Date: Wed, 19 May 2010 11:31:22 -0400 > > I realize practices vary by state and probably by district, as well as certainly by nation. Can anyone point me to materials regarding how decisions are made by CPS to report possible/probable abuse to the district attorney (prosecutor)? I am interested in anecdotal information as well as research. > > I'm interested in this not just for the U.S, actually, but for other countries as well. > > Many thanks! > > Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. > University of Massachusetts > USA >

In North Dakota, a "services required" finding (same as "substantiated" in other states) means the agency must make a report "to the court."It goes to the juvenile supervisor (who is an officer of the court, may be an attorney but is not a prosecutor and does not have to be a lawyer). Statute and administrative rules say only a report must be made. Agency written policy (which does not have the force of statute but is the state agency's written manual) interprets the report requirement to mean the agency is seeking some kind of legal action. CPS investigation policy divides reports into 3 classes. The first and most serious class requires immediate notification of law enforcement, and any police report related to alleged criminal action would of course be sent to the prosecutor (state's attorney, called district attorney or county attorney in some jurisdictions). Sheri McMahon ND > From: lfontesrcn.com > Subject: when to call the D.A. about suspected maltreatment > To: child-maltreatment-research-lcornell.edu > Date: Wed, 19 May 2010 11:31:22 -0400 > > I realize practices vary by state and probably by district, as well as certainly by nation. Can anyone point me to materials regarding how decisions are made by CPS to report possible/probable abuse to the district attorney (prosecutor)? I am interested in anecdotal information as well as research. > > I'm interested in this not just for the U.S, actually, but for other countries as well. > > Many thanks! > > Lisa Fontes, Ph.D. > University of Massachusetts > USA >