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Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

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Message ID: 8530
Date: 2010-08-27

Author:Poha Kane

Subject:Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008

I wonder how many factors do inhibit reporting. Fear of the alleged perp is common, as well as a credibility gap in the mind of the victim - "they won't believe me, but they will believe him." In child protection it's a long accepted axiom that children fear reporting on their perp because they know they may be removed, or are told they will be, with loss of parents, siblings, pets, toys, their room, their friends. Those in the field can easily recall cases that were not reported and openned for many years - many years of perpetrated violence and abuse. This means that all but year in which the case was open and reported are NOT counted into the data. This should be corrected. Some method of updating the past data should be instituted, possibly by footnote or addendum in a special table. This is very possible now that we have electronic access and databases are no longer static, but can be and should be dynamic. The true incidence of annual abuse per child would then surface. We have this capability. The means have been in place for years. Additional costs would be minimal for the increased value of the data provided. Why are we not using this capability? I think it's out of habit using fixed records for so long - the printed page. Of course it would impact statistical analysis as well, but that too is now possible to update swiftly with spreadsheet formula speed. Poha On 8/26/10, Robert E. Longo wrote: > I also wonder how many go unreported BECAUSE of the economy. Sometimes > people fear losing the main bread winner if they report in a poor economy. > > Rob > > Robert E. Longo, LPC, NCC, ACS, BCIA-EEG > Board Certified in Neurofeedback (BCN) > Serendipity Healing Arts > Lexington, NC > www.roblongo.com > RobertLongoLPC@gmail.com > > > > > Paths to Wellness > Current Perspectives > Current Applications > Publications at NEARI Press:catalogue > > CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and > accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy > Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the > specified individual(s) only. This information is confidential. If you are > not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the > intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this > document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking > of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly > prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify > us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. > > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-6214445-8144580@list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-6214445-8144580@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Poha Kane > Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2010 6:03 PM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 > > With all due respect, Doctor, reporting of numbers dropped. > "Reporting," is the key questionable component in making such > assumptions. > > In my debates with child abuse naysayers they constantly use the > number reported as though they were the actual numbers, which we > cannot know, of course. > > There are indicators though that always suggest a great many more > actual incidents than current reporting methods cover. > > One would presume that fewer cases investigated equals fewer numbers > reported - as that data is a back end acquisition, not a front end > one. CPS in various states have, with federal backing, developed more > standard practices in reporting. This means, if I am correct in what > I have observed at Hot Line desks, they reject more incoming calls for > lack of ability to meet federal guidelines in reporting or > substantiating. > > Some states have publicly release to the media that they turn down as > much as 50% of calls they know they should have opened a case on but > did not do so. They triaged them out. > > I think if we looked at only the reports that come through hospitals > and emergency rooms we might see a very different story than what CPS > reports. > > If what you suggest is true this would be one of the most remarkable > bits of evidence in the field of child abuse ever uncovered, a > reduction in child abuse during a time of economic stress. I can't > recall it happening before. > > The giveaway, as far as I can determine is in that stable figure on > child fatalities. How does one have that yet a drop in abuses? > Confounding and paradoxical as it appears to me I'm open to > explanations for it, though it is an apples compared to oranges > question in some ways. . > > Deaths are very hard to conceal, or overlook, abuse is not. > > Thank you for reading, and best wishes, > > Donald > > On 8/25/10, Finkelhor, David wrote: >> Recently released national child maltreatment data for 2008 continue to > show >> declining rates, an encouraging finding given the first year of the > serious >> recession began in 2007. Overall substantiated child maltreatment declined >> 3% from 2007 to 2008, including a 6% decline in sexual abuse. Child >> maltreatment fatalities stayed stable. >> >> > http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/pdf/CV203_Updated%20Trends%20in%20Child%20Maltreatme > nt%202008_8-6-10.pdf >> >> >> >> David Finkelhor >> Crimes against Children Research Center >> Family Research Laboratory >> Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire >> Durham, NH 03824 >> Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 >> email: david.finkelhor@unh.edu >> >> >> My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order. >> >> [cid:image001.jpg@01CB443C.A0796D30] >> > 9OTc4MDE5NTM0Mjg1Nw==> >> >> >> >> http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ >> http://www.unh.edu/frl/ >> >> >> > > > >

I wonder how many factors do inhibit reporting. Fear of the alleged perp is common, as well as a credibility gap in the mind of the victim - "they won't believe me, but they will believe him." In child protection it's a long accepted axiom that children fear reporting on their perp because they know they may be removed, or are told they will be, with loss of parents, siblings, pets, toys, their room, their friends. Those in the field can easily recall cases that were not reported and openned for many years - many years of perpetrated violence and abuse. This means that all but year in which the case was open and reported are NOT counted into the data. This should be corrected. Some method of updating the past data should be instituted, possibly by footnote or addendum in a special table. This is very possible now that we have electronic access and databases are no longer static, but can be and should be dynamic. The true incidence of annual abuse per child would then surface. We have this capability. The means have been in place for years. Additional costs would be minimal for the increased value of the data provided. Why are we not using this capability? I think it's out of habit using fixed records for so long - the printed page. Of course it would impact statistical analysis as well, but that too is now possible to update swiftly with spreadsheet formula speed. Poha On 8/26/10, Robert E. Longo wrote: > I also wonder how many go unreported BECAUSE of the economy. Sometimes > people fear losing the main bread winner if they report in a poor economy. > > Rob > > Robert E. Longo, LPC, NCC, ACS, BCIA-EEG > Board Certified in Neurofeedback (BCN) > Serendipity Healing Arts > Lexington, NC > www.roblongo.com > RobertLongoLPCgmail.com > > > > > Paths to Wellness > Current Perspectives > Current Applications > Publications at NEARI Press:catalogue > > CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE ~ HIPAA Privacy Notification: This message and > accompanying documents are covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy > Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521, and contain information intended for the > specified individual(s) only. This information is confidential. If you are > not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the > intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this > document in error and that any review, dissemination, copying, or the taking > of any action based on the contents of this information is strictly > prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify > us immediately by e-mail, and delete the original message. > > > -----Original Message----- > From: bounce-6214445-8144580list.cornell.edu > [mailto:bounce-6214445-8144580list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Poha Kane > Sent: Wednesday, August 25, 2010 6:03 PM > To: Child Maltreatment Researchers > Subject: Re: New bulletin: Updated Trends in Child Maltreatment, 2008 > > With all due respect, Doctor, reporting of numbers dropped. > "Reporting," is the key questionable component in making such > assumptions. > > In my debates with child abuse naysayers they constantly use the > number reported as though they were the actual numbers, which we > cannot know, of course. > > There are indicators though that always suggest a great many more > actual incidents than current reporting methods cover. > > One would presume that fewer cases investigated equals fewer numbers > reported - as that data is a back end acquisition, not a front end > one. CPS in various states have, with federal backing, developed more > standard practices in reporting. This means, if I am correct in what > I have observed at Hot Line desks, they reject more incoming calls for > lack of ability to meet federal guidelines in reporting or > substantiating. > > Some states have publicly release to the media that they turn down as > much as 50% of calls they know they should have opened a case on but > did not do so. They triaged them out. > > I think if we looked at only the reports that come through hospitals > and emergency rooms we might see a very different story than what CPS > reports. > > If what you suggest is true this would be one of the most remarkable > bits of evidence in the field of child abuse ever uncovered, a > reduction in child abuse during a time of economic stress. I can't > recall it happening before. > > The giveaway, as far as I can determine is in that stable figure on > child fatalities. How does one have that yet a drop in abuses? > Confounding and paradoxical as it appears to me I'm open to > explanations for it, though it is an apples compared to oranges > question in some ways. . > > Deaths are very hard to conceal, or overlook, abuse is not. > > Thank you for reading, and best wishes, > > Donald > > On 8/25/10, Finkelhor, David wrote: >> Recently released national child maltreatment data for 2008 continue to > show >> declining rates, an encouraging finding given the first year of the > serious >> recession began in 2007. Overall substantiated child maltreatment declined >> 3% from 2007 to 2008, including a 6% decline in sexual abuse. Child >> maltreatment fatalities stayed stable. >> >> > http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/pdf/CV203_Updated%20Trends%20in%20Child%20Maltreatme > nt%202008_8-6-10.pdf >> >> >> >> David Finkelhor >> Crimes against Children Research Center >> Family Research Laboratory >> Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire >> Durham, NH 03824 >> Tel 603 862-2761* Fax 603 862-1122 >> email: david.finkelhorunh.edu >> >> >> My new book has been released. Click on it for more details and to order. >> >> [cid:image001.jpg01CB443C.A0796D30] >> > 9OTc4MDE5NTM0Mjg1Nw==> >> >> >> >> http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/ >> http://www.unh.edu/frl/ >> >> >> > > > >