Skip to main content



Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) List Serve

Database of Past CMRL Messages

Welcome to the database of past Child-Maltreatment-Research-L (CMRL) list serve messages. The table below contains all past CMRL messages (text only, no attachments) from Nov. 20, 1996 - March 6, 2018 and is updated quarterly.

Instructions: Postings are listed for browsing with the newest messages first. Click on the linked ID number to see a message. You can search the author, subject, message ID, and message content fields by entering your criteria into this search box:

Message ID: 8446
Date: 2010-03-27

Author:D F MCMAHON

Subject:RE: Evidence-based treatment models for older foster children

There's a hint of irony here, because in the real world of child and family services "treatment" tends to have a generic or at least broad meaning distinguished primarily in terms of placement setting. "Individualized" planning tends to mean (functionally) that a piece of paper has a client's name at the top. References to diagnosis tend to be incidental. Differentiation occurs primarily based on whether there is a demonstrated issue with full scale IQ, substance use, perpetrator role in sexual misconduct, and/or other criminal activity (which can determine placement). I guess this kind of goes along with the list in this response. Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ From: Mark-Chaffin@ouhsc.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-l@list.cornell.edu CC: noriko@uchicago.edu Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2010 08:22:35 -0500 Subject: RE: Evidence-based treatment models for older foster children The difficulty in thinking this through is that evidence-based treatment models are usually matched with a dysfunctional behavior pattern, symptom or diagnosis, not with a type of home or a setting. Because none of us would want to characterize being in foster care as a mental disorder, there is really no treatment per se for being a foster child. But the positive flip side of this is that virtually all evidence based treatment models that fit older teens in general would qualify, presuming that they are matched to a particular disorder or problem in an assessment driven fashion. Given what we know about older teens and prevalent problem areas, you might wish to consider: 1) Multisystemic Therapy (delinquent behavior and/or substance abuse) 2) Parent Management Training (behavior problems) 3) Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ptsd and internalizing symptoms) 4) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (stuff that some might characterize as “borderline personality”) My guess is that these four would probably cover 90% of clinical mental health problem presentations. I don’t know if you are looking beyond mental health treatments, and in the direction of things like life skills training, supported employment, medical homes, family planning, mentoring, and other concrete supportive services as well. Certainly mental health issues are far from the only needs, and maybe not even the dominant need. There also may be more educational materials oriented around common foster child life themes, irrespective of mental health status. Hopefully others can comment on these areas. Curtis McMillen at Washington University in St. Louis would be a good person to consult on this question. Mark Chaffin From: Noriko Ishibashi Martinez [mailto:noriko@uchicago.edu] Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2010 1:59 PM Subject: Evidence-based treatment models for older foster children Hi folks, I'm putting together an annotated bibliography, and I am in the process of searching for published articles on evidence-based treatment models for older foster children, but I thought I would ask the listserv if anyone knows of any particularly good models I should look for specifically. Thanks in advance, Noriko Ishibashi Martinez, PhD, LCSW Adjunct Faculty School of Social Service Administration University of Chicago 969 East 60th Street Chicago, IL 60637 noriko@uchicago.edu

There's a hint of irony here, because in the real world of child and family services "treatment" tends to have a generic or at least broad meaning distinguished primarily in terms of placement setting. "Individualized" planning tends to mean (functionally) that a piece of paper has a client's name at the top. References to diagnosis tend to be incidental. Differentiation occurs primarily based on whether there is a demonstrated issue with full scale IQ, substance use, perpetrator role in sexual misconduct, and/or other criminal activity (which can determine placement). I guess this kind of goes along with the list in this response. Sheri McMahon ND ________________________________ From: Mark-Chaffinouhsc.edu To: child-maltreatment-research-llist.cornell.edu CC: norikouchicago.edu Date: Fri, 26 Mar 2010 08:22:35 -0500 Subject: RE: Evidence-based treatment models for older foster children The difficulty in thinking this through is that evidence-based treatment models are usually matched with a dysfunctional behavior pattern, symptom or diagnosis, not with a type of home or a setting. Because none of us would want to characterize being in foster care as a mental disorder, there is really no treatment per se for being a foster child. But the positive flip side of this is that virtually all evidence based treatment models that fit older teens in general would qualify, presuming that they are matched to a particular disorder or problem in an assessment driven fashion. Given what we know about older teens and prevalent problem areas, you might wish to consider: 1) Multisystemic Therapy (delinquent behavior and/or substance abuse) 2) Parent Management Training (behavior problems) 3) Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ptsd and internalizing symptoms) 4) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (stuff that some might characterize as “borderline personality”) My guess is that these four would probably cover 90% of clinical mental health problem presentations. I don’t know if you are looking beyond mental health treatments, and in the direction of things like life skills training, supported employment, medical homes, family planning, mentoring, and other concrete supportive services as well. Certainly mental health issues are far from the only needs, and maybe not even the dominant need. There also may be more educational materials oriented around common foster child life themes, irrespective of mental health status. Hopefully others can comment on these areas. Curtis McMillen at Washington University in St. Louis would be a good person to consult on this question. Mark Chaffin From: Noriko Ishibashi Martinez [mailto:norikouchicago.edu] Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2010 1:59 PM Subject: Evidence-based treatment models for older foster children Hi folks, I'm putting together an annotated bibliography, and I am in the process of searching for published articles on evidence-based treatment models for older foster children, but I thought I would ask the listserv if anyone knows of any particularly good models I should look for specifically. Thanks in advance, Noriko Ishibashi Martinez, PhD, LCSW Adjunct Faculty School of Social Service Administration University of Chicago 969 East 60th Street Chicago, IL 60637 norikouchicago.edu